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Firm Capital Mortgage Investment Corporation Announces Partial Exercise of Over-Allotment Option – Financial Post

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/NOT FOR DISTRIBUTION TO U.S. NEWS WIRE SERVICES OR DISSEMINATION IN THE UNITED STATES/

TORONTO, Feb. 02, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Firm Capital Mortgage Investment Corporation (the “Corporation”) (TSX: FC) is pleased to announce that the underwriters of its offering of 5.00% convertible unsecured subordinated debentures due March 31, 2029 exercised, in part, their previously disclosed over-allotment option, resulting in the issue of an additional $3,700,000 aggregate principal amount of debentures. The exercise of the over-allotment option brings the total aggregate principal amount of such debentures issued by the Corporation to $43,700,000. The debentures are listed on the Toronto Stock Exchange under the symbol “FC.DB.L”.

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The underwriting syndicate for the offering of debentures was bookrun by TD Securities Inc., National Bank Financial Inc. and CIBC Capital Markets, and included RBC Capital Markets, Scotiabank, Canaccord Genuity Corp., iA Private Wealth Inc., Raymond James Ltd., Desjardins Securities Inc., Echelon Wealth Partners Inc. and Laurentian Bank Securities.

The net proceeds from the exercise of the over-allotment option will be used for debt repayment and for general corporate purposes.

The details of the debentures are described in the Corporation’s press release issued on January 27, 2022 in connection with the closing of the offering of the debentures.

No securities regulatory authority has either approved or disapproved of the contents of this news release. The securities offered have not been, and will not be, registered under the United States Securities Act of 1933, as amended, or any state securities laws, and may not be offered, sold or delivered, directly or indirectly, in the United States, its possessions and other areas subject to its jurisdiction or to, or for the account or for the benefit of a U.S. person, unless an exemption from registration is available. This news release is for information purposes only and does not constitute an offer to sell or a solicitation of an offer to buy any securities of the Corporation in any jurisdiction.

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About The Corporation

Where Mortgage Deals Get Done®

The Corporation, through its mortgage banker, Firm Capital Corporation, is a non-bank lender providing residential and commercial short-term bridge and conventional real estate financing, including construction, mezzanine and equity investments. The Corporation’s investment objective is the preservation of shareholders’ equity, while providing shareholders with a stable stream of monthly dividends from investments. The Corporation achieves its investment objectives through investments in selected niche markets that are under-serviced by large lending institutions. Lending activities to date continue to develop a diversified mortgage portfolio, producing a stable return to shareholders. The Corporation is a mortgage investment corporation (MIC) as defined in the Income Tax Act (Canada). Accordingly, the Corporation is not taxed on income provided that its taxable income is paid to its shareholders in the form of dividends within 90 days after December 31 each year. Such dividends are generally treated by shareholders as interest income, so that each shareholder is in the same position as if the mortgage investments made by the Corporation had been made directly by the shareholder. Full reports of the financial results of the Corporation for the year are outlined in the audited financial statements and the related management’s discussion and analysis of the Corporation, available on the SEDAR website at www.sedar.com. In addition, supplemental information is available on the Corporation’s website at www.firmcapital.com.

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Forward-Looking Statements

This news release contains forward-looking statements within the meaning of applicable securities laws including, among others, statements associated with the expected use of the net proceeds from the exercise of the over-allotment option and statements related to the Corporation’s business, including those contained or incorporated in the Corporation’s prospectus supplement dated January 20, 2022 supplementing the Corporation’s short form base shelf prospectus dated December 30, 2020, as well as statements with respect to management’s beliefs, estimates, and intentions, and similar statements concerning anticipated future events, results, circumstances, performance or expectations that are not historical facts. Forward-looking statements generally can be identified by the use of forward-looking terminology such as “outlook”, “objective”, “may”, “will”, “expect”, “intent”, “estimate”, “anticipate”, “believe”, “should”, “plans” or “continue” or similar expressions suggesting future outcomes or events. Such forward-looking statements reflect management’s current beliefs and are based on information currently available to management.

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These statements are not guarantees and are based on our estimates and assumptions that are subject to risks and uncertainties, including those described in the Corporation’s prospectus supplement dated January 20, 2022 supplementing the Corporation’s short form base shelf prospectus dated December 30, 2020 under “Risk Factors” (a copy of which can be obtained at www.sedar.com). Those risks and uncertainties include, among others, risks associated with public health crises (including COVID-19) mortgage lending, dependence on the Corporation’s manager and mortgage banker, competition for mortgage lending, real estate values, interest rate fluctuations, environmental matters, shareholder liability and the introduction of new tax rules. Material factors or assumptions that were applied in drawing a conclusion or making an estimate set out in the forward-looking information include, among others, that the Corporation is able to invest in mortgages at rates consistent with rates historically achieved, adequate mortgage investment opportunities are presented to the Corporation, adequate bank indebtedness and bank loans are available to the Corporation, and a non-material impact resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic. Although the forward-looking information continued in this new release is based upon what management believes are reasonable assumptions, there can be no assurance that actual results and performance will be consistent with these forward-looking statements.

All forward-looking statements in this news release are qualified by these cautionary statements. Except as required by applicable law, the Corporation undertakes no obligation to publicly update or revise any forward-looking statement, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise.

For further information, please contact:
Firm Capital Mortgage Investment Corporation
Eli Dadouch
President & Chief Executive Officer
(416) 635-0221

Boutique Mortgage Lenders®

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1 Investment Strategy That Works in a Higher-Rate Environment – The Motley Fool Canada

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Many investors are reconstructing their portfolios today similar to what they did during the height of the global pandemic. However, unlike in 2020, the enemy isn’t unknown in 2022. The out-of-control inflation and multiple interest rate hikes will erode purchasing power or cause financial strain.

The stock market has been unpredictable lately, so you can’t afford to make mistakes with your investment choices. For example, growth-oriented companies lost favour with investors because they rely on debt to fund their expansion. Thus, market analysts say that dividend investing is back in style.

Winning strategy

Dividend-paying companies comprise a significant portion of Canada’s equity market. According to the Global Asset Management group of Royal Bank of Canada (TSX:RY)(NYSE:RY), the power of dividends is indisputable. Dividend investing is a winning strategy.

Dividend income from quality stocks can compensate for or offset losses when the TSX declines. Besides boosting long-term returns, these stocks have shown lower volatility, historically. Darren McKiernan, head of the Mackenzie Global Equity and Income Team, said, “It’s such an unpredictable moment right now in the markets.”  

McKiernan’s advice is to focus on quality when reconstructing your portfolio. His team’s portfolio managers, Katherine Owen and Ome Saidi, added, “The overarching goal is to find high-quality businesses with the free cash flow to support a healthy dividend.”

However, the Mackenzie group warns against chasing after high yields, because it could be a red flag. If a company isn’t curated for quality, the dividend payout might not be sustainable. McKiernan said further, “If the world goes back to the long-term averages, as a dividend-focused investor, you’re probably in pretty good shape.”

Most valuable TSX company 

RBC, the TSX’s largest company by market capitalization, is also the country’s most valuable brand. In the 2022 Canada 100 report by Brand Finance, the $174.94 billion bank regained the number one post. Shopify took the top spot on the TSX early in the pandemic only to be dethroned by RBC in January 2022. As of this writing, the market cap of the e-commerce software powerhouse stands at $60.63 billion.

Double-digit income growth

In fiscal 2022 (12 months ended October 31, 2021), RBC’s total revenue increased 5.1% versus fiscal 2021. Net income grew 40.3% year over year to $16 billion. Management followed up its 11% dividend increase in late 2021 with a 7% hike after the earnings release for Q2 fiscal 2022.

RBC’s share price dropped to a low of $71.83 on March 20, 2020. As of June 27, 2022, the bank stock trades at $124.77 per share, or 73.7% higher than its COVID low. On a year-to-date basis, investors are down by only 5.46%. The dividend yield is 4.05%, while the payout ratio is only 39.86%.

The 47,053.73% (13.22% CAGR) total return in 49.57 years confirms the consistent, growing cash flows. Furthermore, RBC has been paying dividends annually without fail since 1870.

Ideal anchor stock

The complex environment in 2022 isn’t new to RBC. It’s the ideal anchor stock or core holding regardless of the market environment. The compelling reasons to invest in this blue-chip stock are strong balance sheet and earnings growth plus an investor-friendly dividend policy.

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Ontario, Quebec getting more EV chargers through fed investment – MobileSyrup

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Ontario and Quebec are set to get a ton of new electric vehicle (EV) charging thanks to new government investment.

Announced on June 30th, the federal government will invest over $3.5 million in Baseload Power to install 31 Level 2 EV chargers and 67 fast chargers across the two provinces. The funding comes from Natural Resource Canada’s Zero-Emission Vehicle Infrastructure Program (ZEVIP). The project’s total cost is over $10.5 million.

Moreover, all the chargers will be available by November 2022.

“We’re making electric vehicles more affordable and charging more accessible where Canadians live, work and play. Investing in more EV chargers, like the ones announced today in Ontario, will put more Canadians in the driver’s seat on the road to a net-zero future and help achieve our climate goals,” said Jonathan Wilkinson, Minister of Natural Resources, in a press release.

Canada has invested $1 billion since 2015 to improve EV affordability and charger accessibility. That includes helping to establish a “coast-to-coast network” of chargers and federal rebates of up to $5,000 for Canadians who switch to EVs.

The government’s 2022 budget includes an additional $1.7 billion to extend that incentive program until March 2025. Additionally, the extension adds new types of vehicles to the program, such as vans, trucks, and SUVs. The budget also provides an extra $400 million to Natural Resources Canada to continue deploying zero-emission vehicle infrastructure by extending the ZEVIP to March 2027.

You can learn more about the EV charger announcement here.

Update 07/02/2022 at 01:18pm ET: Corrected a typo in the second paragraph to ‘Baseload Power.’

Source: Natural Resources Canada

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Investment Outlook: What's In Store For Rest Of 2022? – Forbes

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It’s already been quite a year for investors. Since the start of 2022, the US S&P 500 stock index has plunged by more than 20%, officially taking it into ‘bear market’ territory.

In the UK, the FT-SE 100 index of leading companies can thank the fact that it is composed largely of ‘old economy’ stocks – commodities, energy, financials – for its relatively modest 3% decline

Wherever investors look, however, economic fear is in the driving seat thanks to the combination of post-pandemic global inflation, rising interest rates, extensive lockdowns in China and the war in Ukraine.

None of these events were on investors’ radar this time last year – a stark reminder of how quickly economic and geo-political circumstances can change and affect our savings and investments.

As we move into the second half of 2022, the UK is being stalked by the threat of stagflation. The prospect of a full-blown recession is not out of the question.

Against this gloomy backdrop, we’ve asked commentators to share their thoughts on what investors can learn from events in the first part of this year and how they can position themselves for the remainder of the year.


Brian Byrnes Head of Personal Finance, Moneybox

It’s been a tough first half of the year for investors, but there are some lessons we can take and reasons to be positive.

A key reminder should be the unpredictability of markets. ‘Value’ stocks [companies under-appreciated by the market] weren’t predicted to outperform ‘growth’ stocks [businesses expected to grow at a quicker than average rate], inflation was predicted to be “transitory,” and few predicted the UK market to outperform the US.

As investors, we should learn not to try and predict such movements and certainly not try and invest on the back of such predictions. Instead, we should aim to build our own personal financial plan based on factors within our control. 

For example, if, as investors, we can keep a sensible amount in cash savings, use our available tax wrappers [such as individual savings accounts] efficiently, and invest regularly into long-term diversified portfolios, the unpredictable nature of markets has less of an impact on us than it does for those investing for short-term gain. 

It’s also important, if possible, to keep our regular investments active as we are getting much more for our money than we were six months ago.


Annabel Brodie-Smith Communications Director, Association of Investment Companies

It’s been a challenging year for investors as prices rise and the terrible war in Ukraine has given inflation another unwanted boost.  Many experts are predicting that inflation will remain high while the economy looks close to recession.

 In these tough conditions, it’s important investors have a diversified portfolio, take a long-term view and, if in doubt, they should talk to a financial adviser.

Investors don’t need to rely solely on shares, but can also consider other relatively resilient assets such as infrastructure and renewable energy, which can be accessed through listed investment companies.

There are also a number of investment companies which aim to preserve investors’ capital by investing in a range of assets including inflation-linked bonds, gold, and carefully selected equities. These can add some defensive ballast to investors’ portfolios.

Income will be a high priority for some investors in this difficult environment. Some property investment companies deliver income which is contractually linked to inflation through indexing or upward-only rent reviews, providing some comfort to income seekers when inflation is rapidly rising. 

Of course, dividends are not guaranteed and property would suffer from a prolonged downturn or if lockdowns returned. In general, investment companies have a strong track record of delivering income in difficult times, because they can hold back some of the income they receive from their portfolios to boost dividends when times are tough.

There are seven investment companies that have increased their dividends each year for fifty years or more, and 19 that have increased their dividends every year for over 20 years, known as the dividend heroes.

Investment companies have important features which can help investors when prices are rising and the economy is suffering. They provide permanent capital and are listed on the stock exchange, allowing investors to buy and sell their shares easily on the stock market. This means managers can take a long-term view of their portfolio and are never forced sellers.


Rob Morgan Chief Investment Analyst, Charles Stanley

Falling markets are one of the biggest challenges faced by investors. But these testing periods are an inevitable part of investing. In the long term, they can also present good opportunities to acquire assets as others despondently sell.

Bear markets blow excess froth and complacency away. Highly priced assets with overly optimistic projections built-in come back down to earth. More resilient, diversified portfolios do, inevitably, take a hit. But they live to fight another day and harness the next bull market.

It is generally wise to stand your ground and resist the urge to trade choppy or volatile markets.

Selling out involves two decisions: selling and then rebuying – and it is fiendishly difficult to time these actions correctly. What’s more, you’ll stop the flow of income from dividends and interest from your investments. Over the long term, dividends are an important source of return.

If the bear market is a wake-up call that your portfolio wasn’t sufficiently diversified, then consider taking measured action to ensure you have a better balance going forward. Blending investments with different characteristics and styles is often more useful than relying on geographical diversification.

For instance, more value-focused or dividend-oriented strategies offer something different to those whose portfolios have become dominated by growth companies.

Portfolio construction is important. But time is your best friend, so don’t underestimate the power of even modest investments early on in life. You don’t have to shoot for the moon. In fact, a more measured and disciplined approach is likely to be more sustainable and reliable over the longer term than chasing the latest fad or fashion.

Don’t stop the investment habit at just the wrong moment. Remember, when markets go down it can be a good time to accumulate.

Dips in the market, particularly in the early years, could even work to your advantage provided you have committed to investing for a lengthy period.

If your chosen investment has become cheaper to accumulate it means your investment buys more shares or units to keep for the long term.


Graham Bishop Chief Investment Officer, Handelsbanken Wealth & Asset Management

Financial markets are in the process of digesting a regime change at central banks, creating some volatility, and it can be very difficult to hold one’s nerve during such turbulence.

However, staying invested throughout a range of market conditions, rather than attempting to ‘time’ markets to perfection by moving in and out, is usually the best course of action.

History has shown that it takes time for markets to calm, but that these periods usually prove to be temporary.

With volatility comes opportunity, and we believe that bond markets are starting to offer some value again. Yields have risen, and we are seeing selective opportunities in a range of areas, from high-yielding Asian debt to short-dated UK government bonds.

With investors understandably preoccupied by fears of economic slowdown, we think they could be undervaluing critical areas of the stock market.

The share prices of small and mid-sized US companies have been harshly penalised: they appear to have been priced for impending severe economic recession, which we do not believe is likely.

Unduly overlooked areas like this can offer the potential for attractive future returns.


Alice Haine Personal Finance Analyst, Bestinvest

The markets may appear a little too topsy-turvey for the appetites of more nervous retail investors, but while some might be tempted to panic, sell their holdings and flee the market altogether – crystallising their losses in the process – the best strategy is to do the exact opposite.

Investing when markets are down makes sense if you adopt a long-term view of at least five years or more.

For those worried by the current volatility, waiting for the bear market to end to scoop up investments at bargain prices is not a wise idea, either, as again there is no crystal ball to tell you when the market has bit the bottom.

That’s why taking a long-term view is the best strategy because time in the markets, rather than timing the markets is the secret to riding out the daily ups and downs. Plus, by staying invested, you avoid missing the ‘good days’ when share prices can increase significantly.

The best approach for the rest of 2022 and beyond is to drip feed in smaller amounts either monthly or quarterly no matter what the price is at the time. That not only makes you disciplined about investing on a regular basis, but also minimises risk by ensuring you invest during the lows, when equity prices are cheaper, as well as the highs.

This strategy takes advantage of pound-cost averaging, which cushions some of the effects of volatility by averaging out the price you pay – making your investment costs lower over the long-term and, hopefully, the likelihood of securing decent returns much higher.

It also removes the emotion that is often tied to investing, meaning you can focus on life’s other priorities rather than panicking over the state of your portfolio.


Matthew Roche Associate Investment Director, Killik & Co

Markets have demonstrated their capacity for turbulence in 2022. Such turmoil is often as a result of emotion-over-reason and sentiment-over-analysis of company fundamentals. Many investors have taken fright and sold up.

Markets always have the capacity to move lower. Alas, no one rings a bell at the bottom. It is therefore vital that investors maintain a cash buffer for emergencies and plan major outlays well in advance.

If investors ringfence cash for these purposes, the money they are investing can genuinely be thought of as ‘life-time’ savings. As such, there should be no reason to be a forced seller in a bear market. Doing so would mean turning ‘paper’ losses into ‘actual’ losses. 

We are focusing on a number of long-term growth themes including:

  • Climate change incorporating energy renewal, energy and management businesses.
  • Demographics & consumer preferences – such as changing consumer habits and innovation in healthcare.
  • Infrastructure renewal – physical infrastructure and resource scarcity.
  • Technological advancement – cloud, data, AI, digital transformation, ecommerce and electronic payments.

Scott Spencer Investment Manager, Multi-Manager Team, Columbia Threadneedle Investments

An investment theme that will serve retail UK investors well is to know that valuations are important once again.

The recent market bubble reflected the changes to the economy during the Covid-19 pandemic. Even now, it is difficult to discern whether the shift to working-from-home was temporary and will tail off as lockdowns end, or whether it marks a permanent change.

What do we know in the aftermath of this market bubble? Well, that some, but not all, cryptocurrencies are pointless and so have no value outside the enthusiasm that they generate.

Also, that large US technology companies – which are strong businesses that will continue to generate profits and growth for years to come – are better value after their fall.

The bubble saw a detachment of the market from fundamentals. The rise of inflation and increase of interest rates has meant that profits in the future are less valuable.

After the bubble, in a time of inflation and rising interest rates, it is crucial to ensure that investment is based on fundamentals. To be able to calculate valuations, the company must have assets and sales and profits and pay dividends to shareholders.

We remain mindful however, that we will see a weakening economic backdrop translate into a weaker environment for corporate earnings and, as we move into recession, it seems likely defaults will pick up.

So, we are moving cautiously. Equity and bond markets look set to remain volatile, but we will continue to see strong reversals from time to time as markets trend lower.

In the short term, market attention will soon turn to the Q2 earnings season and the focus will be on signs of earnings slowing. So far in this sell off, market prices have moved lower, but earnings expectations remain stubbornly high.

For the moment we remain cautious until we have a little more visibility on the outlook for growth, earnings and rates, something that may require a little patience.


Simon Gergel Fund Manager, Merchants Trust

In times of economic uncertainty and volatile stock markets it is best to focus on the medium to long term and try to avoid making decisions based upon short term news-flow and market noise.

We try to identify soundly-financed companies that we expect to emerge from current uncertainties with a strong, enduring business. We will look to buy these, if short- term volatility has left them trading at a significant discount to their future intrinsic value. 

At the moment some of the best value is evident in the house building, retail and consumer sectors. That said, it is important to understand individual business models and risks.


Thomas Gehlen Market Strategist, Kleinwort Hambros

During these times, we rely on three main themes. Firstly, rather than following media-driven sentiment, trust the data. Inflation shows signs of peaking and monetary policy, while tightening, still remains loose by historical standards, so a severe recession is not our base case. Avoid panic and rash decision-making.

Secondly, maximise diversification. Throughout the cheap money era [when central banks globally deployed vast swathes of quantitative easing akin to printing money], it paid off to simply concentrate investment in equity growth trackers.

Given the heightened uncertainty, diversification has come back into focus. This includes traditional safe havens such as gold and government bonds, but also riskier yet less correlated asset classes such as commodities, hedge funds or infrastructure.

Lastly, remain flexible: we currently prefer a neutral stance on risk assets and some cash reserves to enable a rapid response should market conditions worsen or, indeed, turn for the better.


Dan Boardman-Weston CEO & CIO, BRI Wealth Management

The circumstances that have led us to this uncertainty may be novel, but uncertainty itself is not.

During times like this, it’s important to recognise the role emotion can play in investing as well as recognising it is also the first step in taking advantage of it.

Fear, desperation, panic, capitulation, despondency and depression are all emotions that we may feel about the markets over the coming period. Calm, rational thinking is essential, however, and it gives the patient and logical investor opportunities to generate attractive long-term returns.

Markets are likely to remain volatile over the coming months and so it makes sense to try and strike a balance between ‘offence’ and ‘defence’.

By ‘offence’, I mean that if investors are sitting on cash balances, then gradually investing some of that into the market would make sense over the coming months. So, too, does looking at relative value opportunities between and within asset classes.

For example, the FTSE 100 is down barely 1% this year due to its exposure to oil, mining and banks, whereas the FTSE 250 has declined nearly 20%. If that trend persists, then recycling capital from one area to the other could provide long-term opportunities.


Graham Bentley CIO, Avellemy

Unusually, even lower-risk investors have suffered because their ‘safe haven’ investments such as gilts and corporate bonds have suffered double-digit falls this year. Additionally, many investors in this situation are taking regular fixed withdrawals from diminishing pension portfolios and cannot ‘buy the bottom’ with new money.  

That said, good companies don’t stop being good just because their prices fall. Equities go up over the long term, and it is better to buy them when they’ve fallen a lot.

Investors and their financial advisers might want to consider discussing a counter-intuitive strategy with their clients, for example, increasing equity exposure to protect their portfolios.


Jason Xavier Head of EMEA Capital Markets, Franklin Templeton

Recent events, such as the pandemic and the war in Ukraine, highlight the need for liquidity [a measure of the ease with which an asset or security can be converted into ready cash] in investment portfolios.

In addition to the low costs and transparency benefits of exchange-traded funds (ETFs), investors are increasingly embracing their liquidity, too.

The robustness of the ETF eco-system has allowed investors to navigate these uncertain times as it has during past instances of market stress and will continue to serve investors as the economic backdrop remains challenging.


Adrian Gosden Investment Director UK Equities, GAM Investments 

The outlook for investing in complex. Interest rates need to rise to bring inflation under control. Investors fear this may induce a recession.

Given this outlook, investors should concentrate on investing in equities that can deliver a robust and growing dividend. This will ensure you receive an income stream that has a good chance of keeping pace with inflation.

The UK market has a good income stream from dividends at the moment, but also has the advantage of significant corporate activity and share buybacks. This means you have a good chance of benefiting from more than just the dividend in 2022 and into 2023.


Mike Stimpson Partner, Saltus 

The overall message to investors is “keep calm”. We are most likely passing through the worst period of market worries. Employment is high and wages are rising. Recent price falls have thrown up great opportunities as an enormous amount of bad news is now ‘in the price’.

We are also passing through the peak of inflation over the next three to four months. The pressure will start easing towards the end of 2022 and this will help markets find their feet. Keep thinking long term and, if you can, keep saving in ISAs and pensions. This is a good time to buy assets after their falls year-to-date.

Market volatility is a fact of life and it isn’t going to change but the good news is that the flipside of volatility is opportunity. A professional asset manager, with a global reach, can scour the world using market volatility to pick up great assets at good prices.

This is exactly what we are doing adding to everything from US small companies to gold.


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