Connect with us

Media

First COVID-19 vaccines arrive in Japan from Pfizer – media – Financial Post

Published

 on


Article content

TOKYO — The first batch of Pfizer Inc’s COVID-19 vaccine arrived in Japan on Friday, local media reported, with official approval for the shots expected within days as the country races to control a third wave of infections ahead of the Olympic Games.

A government health panel is due to deliberate on the vaccine later on Friday, when it is expected to green-light the shots for formal approval. Kyodo News reported that approval would come on Sunday.

Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga has said vaccinations would begin from the middle of next week, starting with health workers, and the government hopes to have secured enough supplies for the whole populace by mid-year.

A Japanese health ministry official said he could not confirm the reports of the vaccine’s arrival due to security reasons.

Media sent news alerts on the arrival of the first batch of vaccines at Narita international airport, near Tokyo, amid concerns about supply due to questions over the European Union’s willingness to allow COVID-19 vaccines to leave its territory. The number of doses that arrived was not reported.

The European Commission said on Thursday it has so far approved all requests for the export of COVID-19 vaccines, including to Japan, since it set up a mechanism to monitor vaccine flows on Jan. 30.

Article content

Pfizer applied for Japanese approval in December for its COVID-19 vaccine, which is already being administered in the United States, Singapore and other parts of the world.

The Japanese government has arranged to buy 144 million doses, or enough to inoculate 72 million people, of the vaccine made by the U.S. drugmaker and German partner BioNTech . It also has deals for vaccines being developed by AstraZeneca Plc, Moderna Inc, and Novavax Inc .

Japan has so far recorded about 410,000 coronavirus cases and 6,772 deaths, and is racing to get infections under control especially ahead of the Tokyo Olympic Games starting in July.

Most of Japan is still under a state of emergency after its third and most deadly wave of the virus hit late last year, though cases and fatalities have trended lower in the past couple weeks. (Reporting by Rocky Swift and Kiyoshi Takenaka; Editing by Lincoln Feast.)

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Media

Spotlighting women in media across the CFL – CFL.ca

Published

 on


Like Beyonce said, who runs the world? Girls. Which really is the truth.

Today is International Women’s Day, where we take the opportunity to celebrate the incredible women that surround us in our lives. Whether it’s our mothers, sisters, coworkers, neighbours or anyone in between, we take this day to relish in their accomplishments.

It’s also a chance to acknowledge the women who came before us that paved the way and those in front of us that will be looking for guidance to achieve their dreams.

To celebrate this year, I wanted to shine a light on the women in and around the CFL that cover our league so greatly. These are the ones that are on broadcasts, are writing for digital publications or newspapers or facilitate media appearances for their teams’ players, helping to tell their stories.

RELATED
» 
Steinberg’s MMQB: Meet the woman behind CFL.ca
» O’Leary: Raiche living her dream of working in football

Let’s start in the West Coast and make our way across the country.

Karen Surman was the BC Lions sideline reporter before the unfortunate cancellation of TSN1040. But when she was on air, she was one of the best in the business. There’s no way she’ll be a free agent for very long. Next up is Gemma Karstens-Smith who is a reporter for The Canadian Press based in Vancouver. Karstens-Smith also covers the Lions but she does so with her exquisite writing. And don’t forget about Alex Ruiz, who is the Lions’ Manager of Digital Platforms and Social Media, and is top-notch at ensuring BC’s fans are as close to the team as possible on their social channels.

As we continue, we arrive in Calgary, where two exceptional women cover the Calgary Stampeders. First is Alanna Nolan, who not only is absolutely amazing at her position as the Stamps’ host and reporter, but she also doubles as the host for the Calgary Flames. Another reporter for The Canadian Press is Donna Spencer, who uses her incredible way with words to report on the club, bringing fans close to their favourite team and players.

Moving on to Edmonton, Quinn Phillips is a reporter covering the Edmonton Football Team for Global. Phillips’ storytelling ability is always on full display as shines a light on the Green and Gold.

Now travelling to Saskatchewan, where there are two women that I want to focus on in Regina. The first is Arielle Zerr, the Director of Communications for the Saskatchewan Roughriders. After transitioning from a radio reporter covering the Riders, Zerr is now an integral part of Saskatchewan’s coverage in the media. She’s the one facilitating Zoom conference calls, sending press releases and making sure the players are in the right spot for any appearances. Second is Claire Hanna, who is the woman on the sidelines on TSN during Roughriders broadcasts, covering the team all week in practice and then bringing those stories to life on game day.

Now onto Winnipeg, where Judy Owen does a fantastic job holding down the fort for The Canadian Press covering the Winnipeg Blue Bombers. And last, but certainly not least, is Sara Orlesky, who covers the Bombers and the Winnipeg Jets for TSN. Sara’s incredible on-air presence is top notch and has been my inspiration as I started getting into sports journalism.

If there’s one thing that unites all of these women across the country is excellence, as they all do a phenomenal job covering the league that we all know and love.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Media

Spotlighting women in media across the CFL – CFL.ca

Published

 on


Like Beyonce said, who runs the world? Girls. Which really is the truth.

Today is International Women’s Day, where we take the opportunity to celebrate the incredible women that surround us in our lives. Whether it’s our mothers, sisters, coworkers, neighbours or anyone in between, we take this day to relish in their accomplishments.

It’s also a chance to acknowledge the women who came before us that paved the way and those in front of us that will be looking for guidance to achieve their dreams.

To celebrate this year, I wanted to shine a light on the women in and around the CFL that cover our league so greatly. These are the ones that are on broadcasts, are writing for digital publications or newspapers or facilitate media appearances for their teams’ players, helping to tell their stories.

RELATED
» 
Steinberg’s MMQB: Meet the woman behind CFL.ca
» O’Leary: Raiche living her dream of working in football

Let’s start in the West Coast and make our way across the country.

Karen Surman was the BC Lions sideline reporter before the unfortunate cancellation of TSN1040. But when she was on air, she was one of the best in the business. There’s no way she’ll be a free agent for very long. Next up is Gemma Karstens-Smith who is a reporter for The Canadian Press based in Vancouver. Karstens-Smith also covers the Lions but she does so with her exquisite writing. And don’t forget about Alex Ruiz, who is the Lions’ Manager of Digital Platforms and Social Media, and is top-notch at ensuring BC’s fans are as close to the team as possible on their social channels.

As we continue, we arrive in Calgary, where two exceptional women cover the Calgary Stampeders. First is Alanna Nolan, who not only is absolutely amazing at her position as the Stamps’ host and reporter, but she also doubles as the host for the Calgary Flames. Another reporter for The Canadian Press is Donna Spencer, who uses her incredible way with words to report on the club, bringing fans close to their favourite team and players.

Moving on to Edmonton, Quinn Phillips is a reporter covering the Edmonton Football Team for Global. Phillips’ storytelling ability is always on full display as shines a light on the Green and Gold.

Now travelling to Saskatchewan, where there are two women that I want to focus on in Regina. The first is Arielle Zerr, the Director of Communications for the Saskatchewan Roughriders. After transitioning from a radio reporter covering the Riders, Zerr is now an integral part of Saskatchewan’s coverage in the media. She’s the one facilitating Zoom conference calls, sending press releases and making sure the players are in the right spot for any appearances. Second is Claire Hanna, who is the woman on the sidelines on TSN during Roughriders broadcasts, covering the team all week in practice and then bringing those stories to life on game day.

Now onto Winnipeg, where Judy Owen does a fantastic job holding down the fort for The Canadian Press covering the Winnipeg Blue Bombers. And last, but certainly not least, is Sara Orlesky, who covers the Bombers and the Winnipeg Jets for TSN. Sara’s incredible on-air presence is top notch and has been my inspiration as I started getting into sports journalism.

If there’s one thing that unites all of these women across the country is excellence, as they all do a phenomenal job covering the league that we all know and love.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Media

Myanmar protesters defy curfew; media outlets ordered shut – CTV News

Published

 on


MANDALAY, MYANMAR —
Demonstrators in Myanmar’s biggest city came out Monday night for their first mass protests in defiance of an 8 p.m. curfew, seeking to show support for an estimated 200 students trapped by security forces in a small area of one neighbourhood.

The students and other civilians earlier took part in one of the many daily protests across the country against the military’s seizure of power last month that ousted the elected government of Aung San Suu Kyi.

The military government also placed a major curb on media coverage of the crisis. It announced that the licenses of five local media outlets – Mizzima, DVB, Khit Thit Media, Myanmar Now and 7Day News – have been cancelled.

“These media companies are no longer allowed to broadcast or write or give information by using any kind of media platform or using any media technology,” it said on state broadcaster MRTV.

All five had been offering extensive coverage of the protests, often with live steaming video online. The offices of Myanmar Now were raided by the authorities Monday before the measure was announced. The government has detained dozens of journalists since the coup, including a Myanmar Now reporter and Thein Zaw of The Associated Press, both of whom have been charged under a public order law that carried a penalty of up to three years in prison.

The night’s street protests began after police cordoned off part of Yangon’s Sanchaung neighbourhood and were believed to be conducting door-to-door searches for those who fled attacks by security forces to seek shelter in the homes of sympathetic strangers.

News of their plight spread quickly on social media, and people poured into the streets in neighbourhoods all over the city to show solidarity and in hopes of drawing some of the pressure off the hunted protesters. On some streets, they constructed makeshift barricades with whatever was at hand.

In the Insein district, they spread across road junctions, singing songs, chanting pro-democracy slogans and banging objects together.

The diplomatic missions of the United States, Britain, Canada and the European Union all issued statements urging the security forces to allow the trapped people to return safely to their homes. Although all have been sharply critical of the Feb. 1 coup and police violence, it is unusual for such diplomatic statements to be issued in connection with a specific, ongoing incident.

“There is heightened tension caused by security forces surrounding Kyun Taw Road in Sanchaung Township, Yangon. We call on those security forces to withdraw and allow people to go home safely, ” said the U.S. Embassy’s statement.

By midnight Myanmar time, there had been no reports of clashes between police and protesters, although security forces chased crowds, harassed residents watching from windows, and fired stun grenades. They also were some reports of injuries from rubber bullets.

The nighttime hours have become increasingly dangerous in Myanmar. Police and army units routinely range through neighbourhoods, shooting randomly to intimidate residents and disrupt their sleep, and making targeted arrests.

Security forces shot and killed two people in northern Myanmar during the day, local media reported.

The Irrawaddy online newspaper said the victims were shot in the head during anti-coup protests in Myitkyina in Kachin State. Graphic video on social media showed protesters backing away from tear gas, responding with rocks and then fleeing after a fusillade of what seemed to be automatic gunfire.

Demonstrators hurriedly carried away the injured, including one apparent fatality, a person with a severe head wound. A second body was seen later on a stretcher, his head covered with a cloth.

Another shooting death took place in Pyapon, a city about 120 kilometres (75 miles) south of Yangon.

To date, the government’s violent crackdown has left more than 50 protesters dead. At least 18 people were fatally shot Feb. 28 and 38 on Wednesday, according to the U.N. Human Rights Office.

Security forces also clamped down on anti-coup protesters elsewhere Monday, firing tear gas to break up a crowd of about 1,000 people demonstrating in Pyinmana, a satellite town of the capital, Naypyitaw. The protesters deployed fire extinguishers to create a smokescreen as they fled from authorities.

Thousands of protesters who marched in Mandalay, the second-largest city, dispersed on their own amid fears that soldiers and police were planning to break up their demonstration with force.

Meanwhile, an armed force from one of Myanmar’s ethnic groups was deployed to protect anti-coup marchers in the wake of a brutal crackdown by the junta.

The unit from the Karen National Police Force arrived shortly after dawn to accompany about 2,000 protesters near Myitta in Tanintharyi Region in southeastern Myanmar. They carried an assortment of firearms including assault rifles as they marched ahead of the column down dusty rural roads.

The Karen police force is under the control of the Karen National Union, one of many ethnic organizations that have been fighting for greater autonomy from the central government for decades. The KNU employs both political and, through its armed wing, military means to achieve its aims.

Large-scale protests have occurred daily in many cities and towns since Myanmar’s military seized power, and security forces have responded with ever greater use of lethal force and mass arrests.

On Sunday, police occupied hospitals and universities and reportedly arrested hundreds of people involved in protesting the military takeover.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Trending