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First presumptive case of coronavirus confirmed in B.C. – Global News

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Health officials have confirmed the first presumptive case of the new coronavirus in B.C.

Provincial health officer Bonnie Henry said the case involves a man in his 40s who lives in the Vancouver Coast Health region.

The man recently travelled to the Chinese city of Wuhan, where the outbreak started. After experiencing an onset of symptoms following his return to Vancouver last week, he contacted a primary health-care provider for assessment and care.

Henry said the man is in isolation at home.

No members of his family have shown any symptoms, officials said.

Officials are waiting for test results from the National Microbiology Laboratory in Winnipeg to fully confirm the case.

WATCH: Global News coverage of the new coronavirus

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The update comes as China is reporting 25 more deaths from the viral disease, bringing the death toll to at least 106. It includes the first death in Beijing.

Meanwhile, the wife of the first confirmed patient in Canada is isolated in her home as she awaits final confirmation of her own case.

Officials say the risk of the virus spreading within B.C. remains low.

— With files from The Canadian Press

© 2020 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

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COVID-19 and flu activity in Manitoba drops again

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COVID-19 and influenza activity is on a steady decline in Manitoba, with hospital admissions and new cases dropping significantly for the third straight week.

There were seven people hospitalized for COVID-19 from Jan. 15-21, the latest provincial surveillance data says. The previous reporting week had 28 hospitalizations.

Admissions to intensive care units, due to severe cases, also went down from six to three in that same span.

The total number of deaths related to the virus increased by 15 in the most recent surveillance report, compared to nine the previous week and 25 the week before that.

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There were just 59 new COVID-19 cases detected in the latest report, a more than 50 per cent decline from the 122 in the Jan. 8–14 report. Those numbers, though, are considered significant undercounts due to limited testing offered by Public Health. The province does not track results from home tests.

The weekly test positivity rate for COVID-19 went down to 11.3 per cent from 12.3 per cent in the previous report.

Flu test positivity falls below 1%

As for Influenza A, the primary flu strain this season, the number of cases detected in the current surveillance week is 10, versus 18 the prior week.

A total of two people were admitted to hospital for flu symptoms, with no ICU cases, which is identical to the previous week. Two additional deaths were attributed to the flu in the report for Jan. 15-21, compared to one the previous week.

The current weekly test positivity for Influenza A is 0.8 per cent, whereas it was 1.9 per cent a week ago.

The national rate is 1.3 per cent.

Other respiratory viruses continue to circulate as well, but the test positivity rate for and detection of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) have both decreased as well.

The number of detected RSV cases in the latest report is 105 (down from 131) and the test positivity rate is 8.3 per cent (down from 8.7).

Wastewater surveillance data indicates sustained activity of COVID-19 in Winnipeg and Brandon but at lower levels.

The next reporting date is Feb. 3.

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Study Establishes Connections Between Emotional Maltreatment, Psychiatric Disorders

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New study results published in Child Maltreatment have found links between emotional maltreatment, also known as psychological violence, and psychiatric disorders in childhood and adolescence.

Emotional maltreatment can be challenging to recognize and record, both in research and in practice. Navigating that challenge resulted in an elaborate study conducted by researchers at the Faculty of Medicine in the University of Leipzig, with the goal of understanding the psychological effects that abuse, neglect, and emotional maltreatment have on children and adolescents.

Examples of emotional abuse include when parents subject their children to extreme humiliation, threaten to put them in foster care, or blame children for their own psychological distress or suicidal thoughts. Physical violence also plays a crucial role in the development of psychiatric disorders.

“Our study findings clearly show that emotional maltreatment is not only a very common form of maltreatment, but also one with psychiatric consequences that are similar to or even more severe than other forms of maltreatment,” said study leader and last author Lars White, PhD, in a press release.

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In their study of 778 children, researchers found that 80% of the children and adolescents who reported having been mistreated had also experienced emotional maltreatment. This makes emotional maltreatment the most common form of child abuse.

Additionally, the investigators were able to show that of all forms of maltreatment, psychological violence had the strongest effects on the psyche of the children and adolescents, even in comparison with forms of maltreatment that generally receive more attention, such as physical abuse. In younger children between 3 and 8 years of age, emotional maltreatment led primarily to behavioral problems, whereas in older children it was more likely to lead to depression and anxiety disorders.

To conduct the study, family data were collected with extensive interviews and the researchers analyzed files from youth welfare offices for evidence of maltreatment experiences. The sample consisted of 306 children and adolescents with an experience of maltreatment and 472 participants without these experiences. Among other sources, participants were recruited via the residents’ registration offices, daycare centers, child and youth psychiatry centers, and youth welfare offices in Leipzig and Munich.

“We are particularly grateful for the support of the youth welfare offices because this enabled us to recruit families for the study who have had extremely difficult experiences and who are otherwise difficult to reach for research projects,” said lead author Jan Keil, DrPhil, in the press release.

The findings illustrate that the risk of developing psychiatric disorders after maltreatment is already heightened in early and middle childhood, which underlines the need for early intervention. The authors said emotional maltreatment should be understood as a dimension of abuse unto itself and should be a key focus in both research and treatment efforts.

“We need to educate parents so that they take the child’s perspective more often,” White said in the press release. “As recently as 30 years ago, the commonly held view was that children should be left to cry and that what they experience in childhood they forget anyway. But increasingly, there is a complete shift in attitudes and an appreciation that we need to reach out to the youngest children when they are showing difficult emotions, such as being angry or sad.”

REFERENCE

From emotional maltreatment to psychiatric disorders in childhood and adolescence. News release. EurekAlert; January 12, 2023. Accessed January 17, 2023. https://www.eurekalert.org/news-releases/976487

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Whooping cough outbreak in Lethbridge area, 16 cases reported | CTV News – CTV News Calgary

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Alberta Health Services (AHS) says 16 people are sick with pertussis – better known as whooping cough – in several southern Alberta communities.

The agency says, as of Thursday, three of those patients are in hospital.

The areas impacted by the outbreak include Lethbridge County, Coaldale, Taber, Vauxhall, Grassy Lake and Bow Island.

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Whooping cough is a bacterial infection with symptoms very similar to a cold or flu – runny nose, sneezing, fever and a mild cough – but the cough becomes much more severe as the illness progresses.

It gets its name from coughing spells in youngsters who make a ‘whooping’ sound when inhaling.

AHS says young children are at the greatest risk and complications from whooping cough include pneumonia, convulsions, brain damage and even death.

Routine vaccinations for children provide protection against pertussis, and cases are usually treated with antibiotics.

Further information can be found online.

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