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Folk Art Tells Stories of Struggles – Art & Object

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The museum emphasizes that no one definition encompasses folk art, but guidelines for the collection describe folk art as “of, by, and for the people; all people, inclusive of class, status, culture, community, ethnicity, gender, and religion.”

Folk art is humanity’s visual storytelling. And the stories oftentimes are subversive, encoded tales conveyed during trials or about tribulations.

“In our tradition, folk art is not just a lone voice,” Villela explains. “There are a number of people making these objects, often with techniques passed down from master to apprentice, elder to younger, as with Navajo weavings or Native American pottery. In communities with these traditions, it was a social opportunity to get together and discuss current events and things in people’s lives while making art.”

Since the museum’s inception in 1953, exhibitions have showcased social justice issues oftentimes woven into, painted onto or otherwise part of folk arts. A former art history professor, Villela highlighted the museum’s status in the International Coalition of Sites of Conscience.

“Most [Sites of Conscience] are Holocaust museums or museums of memory that commemorate traumatic events,” Villela said. “Some commemorate incidents or years-long histories of brutal dictatorships murdering people.”

The folk art museum’s Gallery of Conscience has presented numerous exhibitions that spotlighted folk art created in response to oppression of women around the world, the scourge of AIDS, injustices associated with immigration, Japanese-American internment camps, and other displacements.

Villela cited a 2007 exhibit of Peruvian folk art: “This Latin American folk art reflected on the political situation in Peru, a twenty-year civil war, The Shining Path, up to 80,000 people disappeared, killed, many indigenous,” he said.

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Library helps kids make art – Sault Star

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A free four-week art program for children is being offered by Sault Ste. Marie Public Library.

A PDF lesson will be emailed each week. Youngsters have one week to send a photo of their artwork.

A collage will be created featuring student work.

Register by emailing lib.childdk@cityssm.on.ca. Mention online art program in the subject line. Mention the child’s name, age and parent email contact.

Lessons start Sept. 28.

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'A very fundamental question': Is this the world's oldest example of art? – CTV News

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TORONTO —
Famous cave art in France, Indonesia and Spain has long been thought to be the oldest of its kind, but a new study sheds light on Tibetan parietal art that is four times older and may have been created by children.

An international team of researchers came together to determine if the hand and footprints discovered on the Tibetan Plateau were indeed art.

To decide if the sequence of hand and footprints were art, the researchers had to first figure out how these prints got there. The series of five handprints and five footprints, the researchers reported, came from two different people, according to a press release.

Given the slope and that it would have been slippery, the research team ruled out that people would have walked or run across the plateau, which in turn ruled out that these sets of prints may have been a result of people falling.

“It would have been a slippery, sloped surface. You wouldn’t really run across it. Somebody didn’t fall like that. So why create this arrangement of prints?” Thomas Urban, research scientist in the College of Arts and Sciences and with the Cornell Tree Ring Laboratory, said in a press release.

Urban assisted the research team led by David Zhang of Guangzhou University and co-authored the study.

The team of researchers used uranium-series dating to date the artwork. They believe that the footprints were created by a seven-year-old, while the handprints were by a 12-year-old. They also suspect that these kids were ancient relatives of Neanderthals known as Denisovans.

But what really determines if these handprints and footprints are art?

“These young kids saw this medium and intentionally altered it. We can only speculate beyond that,” Urban said. “This could be a kind of performance, a live show, like, somebody says, ‘hey, look at me, I’ve made my handprints over these footprints.’”

For this reason, Urban calls for a broader definition of what is considered art in this context, even if it does rub some the wrong way.

“I think we can make a solid case that this is not utilitarian behaviour. There’s something playful, creative, possibly symbolic about this,” said Urban. “This gets at a very fundamental question of what it actually means to be human.”

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Summerland opening new art gallery | News | pentictonherald.ca – pentictonherald.ca

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The Summerland Community Arts Council invites the public to join in the celebration of the opening of its new art gallery at 9525 Wharton Street, Thursday, Sept. 16 from 7-9 p.m.

EARTHSCAPES by artist Madyln Hamilton is the first exhibition in the new gallery.

She will be present at the opening reception to speak about her work and answer questions.

“My intent is for the viewer to contemplate, examine, and take away a new awareness of their natural surroundings,” said Hamilton who lives on the edge of a wilderness ravine in West Kelowna.

The ravine’s colours, energies, and forms of life serve as inspirations for her work.

EARTHSCAPES run through Oct. 29.

Gallery hours are 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Monday to Friday. Masks are mandatory.

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