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Froid'Art puts Kingston artists on ice – Queen's Journal

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If you walk downtown this month, you might notice a series of ice-encased paintings have cropped up in local businesses’ storefronts.

Jan. 17 marks the first day of Froid’Art, an event that David Dossett, owner of Martello Alley in downtown Kingston, has been organizing for the past six years.

The outdoor ice exhibit consists of 21 paintings—made on plexiglass—that are individually encased in 300-pound ice enclosures and scattered throughout Kingston. The frozen art is painted mostly by artists who show their work at Martello gallery and can be found in front of Trailhead, Tara Natural Foods, and NORTHSIDE Espresso + Kitchen, to name a few. The point of the show is to be a walking art exhibit that people can follow along with. The event will continue until Kingston’s below-freezing temperatures give way to warmer weather.

The exhibit—inspired by his wife, who enjoys taking walks downtown—is meant to bring color to what Dossett refers to as the gray “Limestone City.” But what Dossett enjoys most about the event is, quite simply, the people.

“I love to see the faces of the people when they’ve discovered [the paintings],” Dossett said in a phone interview with The Journal. “It’s amazing how you can make such a big impact with such a simple idea.”

People have come from other provinces to see the ice displays—and for good reason. The event’s popularity has stretched far beyond just Kingston. The city of Lacombe, Alberta, is even hosting their very own Froid’Art-inspired ice sculpture exhibit this year, showcasing high school students’ art.

You can’t get the full effect of the exhibit without seeing it in person. Froid’Art is meant to be an immersive experience, encouraging its viewers to get their blood flowing and interact with Kingston’s historic downtown and local businesses, while also bringing some color to the streets.

“When you see [the art] up close, you think, ‘Oh my god it’s just amazing,’” said Dossett.

While online photos certainly don’t do the sculptures justice, they’re a viable option if you live outside of Kingston and still want to join in on the fun. Photos can be found on the Martello Alley Facebook page or Instagram account.

Despite the event’s popularity, there are still people living in Kingston who haven’t heard of Froid’Art. That’s why Dossett wants people who attend to invite their friends and share the event as much as possible. He wants everyone to have a chance to enjoy it.

The gallery owner wants to spread more awareness of the event among students in particular.

“A lot of Queen’s students, you know how busy they are, they’re studying and then they’ll go to the pub. But they may not see [the paintings] because of everything they’re focusing on.”

One appeal for students is that it’s free to attend, and it’s right downtown—minimal travel necessary. Martello Alley’s Facebook page offers a downloadable map of the various locations, or you can stop by the alley in person for a physical copy. The map lists the location of each piece, along with its name and artist. With the map in hand, people can take a self-guided walking tour of the exhibit to admire the work.

By night, the sculptures are lit up. The combination of the lights and the snow is, according to Dossett, the best part.

“That’s probably the best thing, when you see them, all lit up at night. It’s indescribable,” he said

Describing the first ice-encased art they ever put up, Dossett explained, “We moved it over, covered it in snow, and turned on the lights, and it was like magic.” 

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Vancouver Art Gallery receives $1.5 million donation for new building

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With the latest donation, the VAG now has raised $86.5 million from the private sector for the new building. It’s the most money ever raised by arts and culture organization in BC.

The campaign to build a new Vancouver Art Gallery continues to grow with the donation of $1.5 million by a long-time supporter.

The donation is from Donald Ellis, a Canadian art dealer whose gallery is based in New York. The Donald Ellis Gallery specializes in Northwest Coast art and other historical Indigenous North America art.

Including the Ellis donation, the Vancouver Art Gallery has raised $86.5 million from the private sector to build a new gallery in downtown Vancouver. That figure represents the most money ever raised by an arts and culture organization in B.C.

The VAG announced the Ellis donation Monday.

Ellis said he was “stepping out on a limb a little bit” by making the donation and publicly supporting the capital campaign for a new building.

“It’s the right thing to do and it’s an extension of what I have been doing my whole career,” he said in a video about his VAG donation.

He said the VAG is first among art museums in Canada, and possibly in North America, in the way it has exhibited and showcased Indigenous art.

He cited the seminal exhibition Arts of the Raven exhibition at the VAG in 1967. Curated by Doris Shadbolt, the exhibition marked a fundamental shift in the way a Canadian art institution displayed Indigenous works of the Northwest Coast as art rather than anthropology.

A more recent example took place in 2013 in an exhibition of the work of Charles Edenshaw, the great Haida artist considered one of the most important 19th century Indigenous artists in North America.

Ellis recently donated five of Edenshaw’s works to the VAG: two bracelets (one gold, one silver) three silver spoons.

Because of his appearances on the U.S. version of the Antiques Roadshow, Ellis is one of the rare art dealers with a public presence. In one episode, he appraised a Navajo blanket for $350,000 to $500,000.

“The older man who brought it in starts to tear up, and it became one of the most famous appraisals in the show’s history,” John Mackie said in a story in The Vancouver Sun.

Originally from Ontario, Ellis has spent most of his time in B.C. for the past eight years.

The Donald Ellis Gallery client list includes The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, The National Gallery of Canada in Ottawa and the Musee de Quai Branly in Paris.


Donald Ellis.

PNG

In the video, Ellis spoke passionately about the importance of a new VAG for the city.

“We need a new Vancouver Art Gallery now because Vancouver needs to decide what it wants to be,” he said.

Ellis said a new VAG building won’t only be a place for artists and collectors but also for children, youngsters and adults so they can have the kind of transformative experiences that come from being exposed to different kinds of art.

“We need this,” he said. “The community needs this.”

Ellis acknowledged the importance of Indigenous people to the history of the country. In a VAG news release, he said he’s committed to the new VAG building and the potential it has to promote reconciliation through art.

Daina Augaitis, the VAG’s interim director, said Ellis’ generosity brings the gallery “one step closer” to raising enough to build a new downtown art gallery.

“I’m thrilled that he is making such a remarkable commitment to showcase historical Indigenous art in the new gallery building,” she said in a gallery news release.

Including a $50 million donation from the government of B.C. in 2008, the VAG has raised a total of $136.5 million from public and private sources. The VAG is looking for $100 million from the federal government and another $50 million from Victoria.

The building designed by Herzog & de Meuron includes 80,000 sq. ft of exhibition space — more than double what the VAG has at 750 Hornby — a 300-seat theatre, and two free-access galleries.

The new gallery will be located on a site donated by the city of Vancouver at West Georgia and Cambie.


A silver bracelet by Haida carver Charles Edenshaw (1839-1920). The bracelet of one of five Edenshaw works donated by art dealer Donald Ellis to the Vancouver Art Gallery. Photo: Ian Lefebvre/Vancouver Art Gallery

Ian Lefebvre Vancouver Art Galle /

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Vancouver Art Gallery receives $1.5 million donation for new building – Vancouver Sun

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With the latest donation, the VAG now has raised $86.5 million from the private sector for the new building. It’s the most money ever raised by arts and culture organization in BC.

The campaign to build a new Vancouver Art Gallery continues to grow with the donation of $1.5 million by a long-time supporter.

The donation is from Donald Ellis, a Canadian art dealer whose gallery is based in New York. The Donald Ellis Gallery specializes in Northwest Coast art and other historical Indigenous North America art.

Including the Ellis donation, the Vancouver Art Gallery has raised $86.5 million from the private sector to build a new gallery in downtown Vancouver. That figure represents the most money ever raised by an arts and culture organization in B.C.

The VAG announced the Ellis donation Monday.

Ellis said he was “stepping out on a limb a little bit” by making the donation and publicly supporting the capital campaign for a new building.

“It’s the right thing to do and it’s an extension of what I have been doing my whole career,” he said in a video about his VAG donation.

He said the VAG is first among art museums in Canada, and possibly in North America, in the way it has exhibited and showcased Indigenous art.

He cited the seminal exhibition Arts of the Raven exhibition at the VAG in 1967. Curated by Doris Shadbolt, the exhibition marked a fundamental shift in the way a Canadian art institution displayed Indigenous works of the Northwest Coast as art rather than anthropology.

A more recent example took place in 2013 in an exhibition of the work of Charles Edenshaw, the great Haida artist considered one of the most important 19th century Indigenous artists in North America.

Ellis recently donated five of Edenshaw’s works to the VAG: two bracelets (one gold, one silver) three silver spoons.

Because of his appearances on the U.S. version of the Antiques Roadshow, Ellis is one of the rare art dealers with a public presence. In one episode, he appraised a Navajo blanket for $350,000 to $500,000.

“The older man who brought it in starts to tear up, and it became one of the most famous appraisals in the show’s history,” John Mackie said in a story in The Vancouver Sun.

Originally from Ontario, Ellis has spent most of his time in B.C. for the past eight years.

The Donald Ellis Gallery client list includes The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, The National Gallery of Canada in Ottawa and the Musee de Quai Branly in Paris.


Donald Ellis.

PNG

In the video, Ellis spoke passionately about the importance of a new VAG for the city.

“We need a new Vancouver Art Gallery now because Vancouver needs to decide what it wants to be,” he said.

Ellis said a new VAG building won’t only be a place for artists and collectors but also for children, youngsters and adults so they can have the kind of transformative experiences that come from being exposed to different kinds of art.

“We need this,” he said. “The community needs this.”

Ellis acknowledged the importance of Indigenous people to the history of the country. In a VAG news release, he said he’s committed to the new VAG building and the potential it has to promote reconciliation through art.

Daina Augaitis, the VAG’s interim director, said Ellis’ generosity brings the gallery “one step closer” to raising enough to build a new downtown art gallery.

“I’m thrilled that he is making such a remarkable commitment to showcase historical Indigenous art in the new gallery building,” she said in a gallery news release.

Including a $50 million donation from the government of B.C. in 2008, the VAG has raised a total of $136.5 million from public and private sources. The VAG is looking for $100 million from the federal government and another $50 million from Victoria.

The building designed by Herzog & de Meuron includes 80,000 sq. ft of exhibition space — more than double what the VAG has at 750 Hornby — a 300-seat theatre, and two free-access galleries.

The new gallery will be located on a site donated by the city of Vancouver at West Georgia and Cambie.


A silver bracelet by Haida carver Charles Edenshaw (1839-1920). The bracelet of one of five Edenshaw works donated by art dealer Donald Ellis to the Vancouver Art Gallery. Photo: Ian Lefebvre/Vancouver Art Gallery

Ian Lefebvre Vancouver Art Galle /

PNG

kevingriffin@postmedia.com

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Two more downtown art murals to be finalized next week – GuelphToday

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The city has chosen five artists out of 84 art submissions it received from across Canada for phase two of the Main Street Mural Project.

The five finalists will be asked to develop a project proposal, budget and concept design for the artwork to be installed in two public sites: the left parkade wall and the main parkade wall. 

The winning artwork and artist will be announced on Feb. 28.

The 16-by-24 foot artwork on the left parkade wall with a budget of $18,000 and the 28-by-20 foot artwork on the main parkade wall with a budget of $25,000 will be completed remotely by the artists using aluminum composite panels. The installation will be completed by a third party organized by the city. 

Shortlisted artists for the left parkade are Roadsworth, Lacey and Layla Art, Dan Bergeron and Gabriel Specter.

Shortlisted artists for the main parkade are Annie Hamel, Lacey and Layla Art, scenere0.

Designs for the winning artwork are expected to be completed at the beginning of March with installation completed at the end of April. 

Last year, the City of Guelph received one-time funding from the province’s Main Street Revitalization Initiative to support and revitalize main streets. Phase 1 of the initiative saw artwork of a monarch on the side wall beside the Guelph Farmers’ Market, a mural consisting of Guelph’s founder John Galt among other Guelph landmarks on the side of city hall, an abstract mural on the east underpass wall on the Guelph Farmers’ Market side, and a bird mural on the west underpass wall.

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