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Generation Gap: Ranking each and every Land Rover Range Rover – Driving

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We rank the family tree of one of the most interesting sport-utilities ever built

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The Range Rover is the priciest and best-known member of Land Rover’s family of SUVs, and it’s undergone an interesting journey that has seen it graduate from farm-hand to franchise player among the super-luxury set.

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Along the way, there have been more twists and turns in the Range Rover story than you’ll find in perhaps any other SUV’s origins, as the truck found itself buffeted by the economic realities of 1990s Britain before twirling in the winds of international ownership like some kind of 4×4 hot potato.

Here’s what we think of each and every generation of the Land Rover Range Rover, as we rank the family tree of one of the most interesting sport-utilities ever built.

1969-1996 Land Rover Range Rover Classic

A cutaway illustration of a classic Range Rover
A cutaway illustration of a classic Range Rover Photo by Land Rover

The truck that made Land Rover’s reputation in North America took an astonishingly long time to get here—’officially,’ that is. After just over a decade of sales as a two-door, utility-focused hauler suited for country-dwelling Brits and their open-minded European counterparts, Land Rover added an extra set of entry points to the Range Rover and watched as the rest of the world began to import the rugged, yet stylish SUV in surprisingly large numbers.

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Convinced of their potential in the United States thanks to this healthy grey market, Land Rover began official sales on this side of the Atlantic in 1987. All of those vehicles featured four doors and were initially outfitted with a 3.5-liter 150-horsepower V8 engine (with a larger 4.2-liter mill available by the end of its product run; and a 3.9-liter unit appearing as a bridge in 1989). Older trucks and Euro-sourced models had a wider range of drivetrains to choose from, but no version of the Range Rover could ever be accused of being a speed demon.

Instead, the Range Rover delivered go-anywhere ruggedness paired with an increasingly comfortable interior and an exclusivity not found in any of the Detroit- or Japan-built sport-utilities of the era. Featuring full-time four-wheel-drive and a four-speed automatic transmission, Land Rover’s leading light introduced an entire generation to genteel off-roading and played a major role in building an audience for its expanding line of SUVs in the 1990s.

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2013-present Land Rover Range Rover L405

A 2013 Land Rover Range Rover
A 2013 Land Rover Range Rover Photo by Land Rover

From the first to the last: the current version of the Land Rover Range Rover is by far the best of the breed, and only takes second spot in our rankings due to the cultural and business significant of its original ancestor.

When it appeared as a 2013 model the fourth-generation Range Rover (known internally as the L405) it was a veritable revolution for the brand’s top-tier truck. Now featuring an entirely-aluminum body, the Range Rover was nearly 700 pounds lighter than the third-gen SUV without sacrificing any strength or rigidity. It carried over the older model’s 5.0-liter 375-horsepower V8 engine that could also be had in a 510-horsepower supercharged edition, but it felt much fleeter of foot thanks to its serious weight drop. A supercharged V6 eventually took the place of the base V8 (nearly matching its output), and a turbodiesel and hybrid four-cylinder also found themselves entering the line-up. A long-wheelbase model further satisfied the needs of those for whom more is never enough.

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Perhaps the most impressive aspect of the current Range Rover is how well suited it feels to almost any driving mission. As a plush daily, it’s perfect, but it’s just as nimble parsing difficult terrain as it is pulling up to the valet stand. Quick enough to startle a sports sedan, quiet enough inside to enjoy the faintest strains of your favourite symphony over its stereo, and with enough room to haul whatever doesn’t fit into the Ferrari parked beside it in the garage, the latest Range Rover is perhaps the most versatile flagship ever conceived.

2003-2012 Land Rover Range Rover L322

A 2005 Land Rover Range Rover
A 2005 Land Rover Range Rover Photo by Land Rover

Things got weird for Land Rover in the early 2000s as the company’s ownership changed hands from BMW to Ford to Tata, all in the space of the L322 Range Rover’s lifetime. As a result, despite having been initially developed under BMW’s watchful eye, the vehicle’s engine bay was also graced by Ford-derived Jaguar power plants. This included a number of V8 and turbodiesel options, depending on which market it was sold in, generally creating a confusing mess for second-hand owners at the parts counter.

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That being said, the L322 was nearly as important as the Classic in terms of putting the Range Rover over with a new set of buyers. With dramatic looks that eschewed the conservatism that had come before it and a new performance mandate that considered straight-line speed and on-tarmac handling to be as important as fording streams and climbing over boulders, Land Rover was able to get the L322 in front of deep-pocketed customers who couldn’t find anything else like it on the market. It’s a short leap from this model Range Rover to the serious upshift in power and presence from Mercedes-Benz and BMW in the SUV segment starting in the late 2000s.

1994-2002 Land Rover Range Rover P38

A 2000 Land Rover Range Rover
A 2000 Land Rover Range Rover Photo by Land Rover

That production overlap you’re noticing with the Classic? It’s a reflection of the somewhat turbulent state of affairs at Land Rover in the mid-’90s. The second-generation Range Rover claimed to be a complete redesign versus the Classic, but its subdued looks (the result of a tight budget) didn’t push any boundaries in terms of style, nor did the vehicle follow through on any of the fantastical drivetrain promises made (V12 SUV, anyone?) in its early development stages.

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Instead, the P38 Range Rover kept on keepin’ on with pretty much the same set of attributes as the vehicle it replaced, featuring the choice of either diesel power; or one of two V8 engines that topped out at 225 horses. Interior trappings were modernized, and the vehicle’s air suspension system carried over from later versions of the Classic, where it was given a set of finicky computer controls for ride height adjustment.

Is there anything ‘wrong’ with the P38? Not really, aside from its glaring lack of reliability, a feature common to almost every Range Rover generation. Rather, it’s the lack of imagination behind the design that seems destined to keep the second go-around languishing at the back of the used car lot rather than claiming a front-row position at the local show-and-shine.

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Why did Apple change the camera position on the iPhone 13? – The Next Web

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Aesthetically, the iPhone 13 is similar to last year’s model — apart from one key element: the camera placement.

The iPhone 12 had vertically stacked lenses. On the iPhone 13, these are now diagonal. So, here’s the question we’re going to answer today: why?

In my mind, there are two key reasons Apple has changed the iPhone 13 lens placement — and you can split these into technical and marketing.

The technical reason for the diagonal camera layout on the iPhone 13

I’m beginning with this because I believe it’s the biggest reason for the design change.

Now, one of the new features introduced with the iPhone 13 and iPhone 13 mini is something called “sensor shift image optical stabilization.”

This appeared in the iPhone 12 Pro models last year and is effectively a mechanism that moves the lens to help you get steadier shots. Think of it as a counter to the slight movement your hands make while you’re taking a photograph.

When Apple announced the iPhone 13, they showed the sensor shift image optical stabilization in action:

Watch this GIF a few times. Notice anything? About the size of the housing?

It’s plain to see that, comparatively, the sensor shift image optical stabilization hardware is large. In fact, it takes up a huge chunk of camera bump.

It’d be technically impossible to fit the mechanism in while keeping the vertical camera layout of the iPhone 12. Making the lens placement on the iPhone 13 diagonal is an elegant solution.

The other option would be changing the location of the camera bump altogether, potentially to the middle of the phone. But this would not only alter the iPhone 13‘s aesthetics, but it would also make a lot of accessories useless too.

That, friends, is the technical reason Apple has made the iPhone 13 cameras diagonal.

The marketing reason for changing the camera position on the iPhone 13

While I think this argument has legs, I don’t think marketing was a direct force for the change. Instead, it’s something that likely supported the shift.

Basically, the iPhone 13 is very similar to the iPhone 12. The upgrades, including things like a smaller notch, brighter screen, and a bigger battery, aren’t exactly attention grabbing,

These aren’t bad updates per se, but they’re expected, not lusted after.

Here’s a picture of the iPhone 13 phones to help break up this damn waffle.
apple iphone 13

Really, the biggest point of differentiation for the public at large is the new diagonal camera layout. It’s a clear way to signal that you’re in possession of the latest device and is an excellent marketing tool to encourage people to upgrade.

This is also partly the reason why the change has been mocked. For those outside the tech bubble, changing the iPhone camera layout seems like solely a cheap trick to increase sales. Which is a half truth.

Ultimately,  the new camera placement on the iPhone 13 is a technical solution that also delivers some marketing ammunition. Which is either lucky, clever, or, well, both.

There we have it! Two solid reasons why Apple has changed the position of cameras on the iPhone 13.

Did you know we have a newsletter all about consumer tech? It’s called Plugged In – and you can subscribe to it right here.

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Apple Online Store Down Ahead of iPhone 13 and 13 Pro Pre-Orders – MacRumors

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Apple’s online store is down ahead of iPhone 13 mini, ‌iPhone 13‌, iPhone 13 Pro, and ‌iPhone 13 Pro‌ Max pre-orders, which are set to begin at 5:00 a.m. Pacific Time in the United States.


“You’re… early,” reads the Apple Store message when attempting to visit the U.S. website. “Pre-order begins at 5:00 a.m. PDT. Enjoy the extra sleep.” Apple used to do new device pre-orders at 12:01 a.m. Pacific Time, but since 2019, has been holding iPhone pre-orders at 5:00 a.m.

The ‌‌iPhone 13‌ mini, ‌iPhone 13‌,‌ ‌iPhone 13 Pro‌, and ‌iPhone 13 Pro‌ Max are launching in more than 30 countries and regions around the world, and a full list of launch times can be found in our time zone guide.

All of the new ‌iPhone 13‌ models are nearly identical in design to last year’s iPhone 12 models, featuring flat edges, an aerospace-grade aluminum enclosure, a glass back, and a slight increase in thickness.

Key features across the ‌iPhone 13‌ lineup include a faster A15 Bionic chip, camera improvements, longer battery life, and a smaller notch. The two Pro models also feature a ProMotion display with a variable refresh rate up to 120Hz. The ‌iPhone 13‌ models are available in Pink, Blue, Midnight (black), Starlight (silver/gold), and (PRODUCT)RED.

If you’re hoping to get one of the models in the ‌new ‌iPhone 13‌ lineup on launch day, it’s a good idea to purchase early because there’s no word on how much supply Apple will have.

Pricing on the ‌iPhone 13‌ mini starts at $699, while pricing on the ‌iPhone 13‌ starts at $799, the ‌iPhone 13 Pro‌ starts at $999, and the ‌iPhone 13 Pro‌ Max begins at $1099. The official launch, when pre-orders will be out for delivery, is next Friday, September 24.

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The new iPad Mini seems great even if you love Android – Android Central

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Source: Apple

I’ve been an Android user since the first day the first Android phone became available, and I’ve been through many different devices. Of course, like many of you all, I’ve also owned and used iPhones, BlackBerrys, Windows phones, and all the rest of the “cool” tech because I just love cool tech.

I’m also very much a small phone guy because one of the most important things to me is how easy it is to carry something that basically lives inside my pocket. One of the reasons the Galaxy S21 is one of the best Android phones is because it’s not gigantic, for example. The only time I wish my phone were bigger is when I want to veg out and just consume.

I just want to consume.

That’s where tablets shine. Watching videos or playing games on something with a much larger screen is just better, ya know? Yes, I can use my phone and do those same things, and I won’t try to say it’s a bad experience because it’s not. It’s just not as good. I’ve been thinking about getting a smaller tablet to try it again, and Apple might just have shown me what I want in the 2021 iPad Mini.

No, I’m not some sort of “traitor” to the Android ecosystem because I owe zero allegiance to any tech company. I like the way Android works better than iOS does, but that’s just me, and plenty of people feel differently. But I don’t run out and buy a thing because some tech company made it. Every company needs to work for my dollars. And since Google is unwilling to remake the Nexus 7 with great new specs, I don’t have a “favorite” tablet brand.

Nexus 7

Nexus 7Source: Android Central

I want a tablet for all the wrong reasons, according to the companies that make them. I have no desire to replace my PC or Chromebook with a Pro tablet. I’m not going to replace my phone with a cellular tablet just because it can make calls and get messages. I like the phone and Chromebook I use, and don’t see how a tablet can replace either.

Since Google isn’t going to remake the Nexus 7, the iPad Mini might be the best substitute.

But the right tablet can tempt me, so long as it’s on the smaller side. I have a Pixel Slate here if I wanted to use a ginormous heavy tablet, and because it has a desktop browser, it’s going to be better at doing many of the things I want a tablet to do. It needs to be plenty powerful enough to play HD video without sputtering and have Wi-Fi that’s strong enough to keep up. A few cool games are a plus, too. My tablet would be just for fun and not at all for work.

I’ve thought about foldables here, too. Something like the Galaxy Z Fold 3 could work, but I’m not yet sold on how the phone side of things play out. Maybe in a couple of years, but now I think I would end up spending twice as much on a device that I would only use as a tablet. Not an ideal situation for my wallet.

I basically ignored all the talk about how artists and professionals love the iPad Mini, but what I did pay attention to has me thinking it might be the one. The power is there — forget all the XX% faster marketing stuff, but I’ve seen enough from Apple to know the Bionic SoC platform is going to handle things. The size is right, and even the $500 price tag isn’t insane like many other Apple devices are.

Samsung Galaxy Z Fold 3 S Pen Taking Notes

Samsung Galaxy Z Fold 3 S Pen Taking NotesSource: Nick Sutrich / Android Central

Mostly though, it’s the ecosystem. Yes, that word gets tossed around a lot, and sometimes my brain goes numb after hearing it, but this is one place where everything can work great for me. All of Google’s services work well on iOS, so I know I’ll have the experience I want from Google Photos or YouTube, and Apple does a great job at filling in the rest.

Say what you will about Apple’s way of doing business, but the App Store has plenty of great tablet apps.

Yeah, Apple’s walled garden sucks. Ask anyone who wants to play Fortnite on a new iPad Mini about that if you want another opinion, and I’m not a fan of a company trying to tell me what I can do with something I paid money to buy. But I can’t deny that Apple has its shit together when it comes to tablet apps, and chances are I would find a few I would want to install. Google could learn a lot here.

I think an iPad Mini would complement my Android phone and my other tech in the right ways. I’m not rushing out to preorder one just yet, and I’ll wait to read some reviews before I whip out the plastic. I’d also recommend any Android or Chrome user as interested in the iPad Mini as I am to do the same thing.

I’ve talked to a lot of you guys who use an iPad along with your Android phones, and I think I get it now. I’m not going to write it off just because it’s from that fruit company. It might be what a lot of Android folks just like me are looking for.

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