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Gibsons building an art-focused walking and cycling path – Coast Reporter

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A walking and cycling path between upper and lower Gibsons, providing views of existing and new public artwork, is slated to open in June 2022. 

A Dec. 15 press release from the Island Coastal Economic Trust (ICET) announced a grant of $50,000 to the Town to cover the full cost of building this project.

Construction of the path is slated to begin in January. The route of the new active transportation corridor and visitor attraction will start at the town’s entrance at Gibsons Creek and make its way through lower Gibsons. Path users will then be able to continue along the town’s existing Inglis Trail, to upper Gibsons and the Sunshine Coast Highway.   

The town’s Public Art Advisory Committee designed the project, which will take users through some of the town’s most scenic natural areas, the release states.  Existing public art displays at the Gibsons Public Art Gallery, the town hall, the Gibsons public market and Arts Building will be able to be seen from the trail. 

Additional commissioned art works will be added at strategic sites along the path as standalone displays as well as trailhead markers. These will be selected through a jury submission call created by the committee in the new year. Works will be selected based on artistic merit, longevity, maintenance, budget and other practical considerations.

“Once completed, the Art Path will feature the works of many local and Indigenous artists,” said Town of Gibsons’ Mayor Bill Beamish, speaking on behalf of the committee. “It will link the adjacent Squamish Nation Chekwelp lands to our town and provide the opportunity for residents and visitors to experience the richness of our arts community by expanding on the original works already featured in many areas. We are very grateful for this grant and look forward to commissioning new works which will spark creative interest and grow civic pride.”

Path maps and guides will be published online for easy digital access with scannable QR codes that will provide links to background information about points of interest. Steeper sections or areas with other potential accessibility challenges will be indicated on the trail map, along with alternative routing suggestions. Printed versions of the map and guide will be created and available for pickup at the Gibsons’ Tourist Information Centre and other relevant locations. 

The project was funded through ICET’s THRIVE Small Capital Program, which provides full funding of up to $50,000 for projects without the need for a municipal contribution.  The program was established in May 2021 as a joint collaboration with the ICET and Vancouver, Coast & Mountains tourism region of Destination BC.

“We expect that innovative art, presented in a captivating setting, will increase tourist visits to our town and encourage residents to take advantage of a convenient travel corridor to journey between our upper and lower business centres,” the Town stated in its successful program application. “Overtime, we expect the benefit of increased business from pedestrian traffic will be ongoing and spread throughout our entire community.” 

“The project epitomizes the goals of the THRIVE program to increase and drive vitality back into core areas in captivating and innovative ways,” ICET Board Chair Aaron Stone said in the release.

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Cultivating Creativity: Celebrating the 'Art of Craft' – Belleville Intelligencer

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Quinte Arts Council

Craft comes in all forms: fibre, wood, pottery, glass, metal, paper and more.

From the 13th century onwards, practitioners were traditionally associated with a Guild, the decline of which corresponded with the Industrial Revolution and mass production. Craft as an ideology came about during the 19th century British Arts and Craft movement as an antithesis to modernity.

According to the Washington, DC-based James Renwick Alliance for Craft, “Craft is a particular approach to making with a strong connection to materials, skill and process. Art is most traditionally thought of as drawing or painting that is a visual depiction of a personal expression.”

The trouble starts with questions around the relative value or hierarchy of that which is utilized (craft) to that which is admired (art).

For our most recent Umbrella magazine, the Quinte Arts Council dedicated the winter issue to celebrating the Art of Craft and how the lines between the two often blur in innovative and exciting ways.

We profiled 12 Quinte-based craftspeople who express their art through their craft.

The first is blacksmith Amy Liden, of Liden Forge in Picton, Ont.: Think of any medieval movie with swords and there’s most likely to be a blacksmith; often a hulking sweaty man pounding away on an anvil. Based on representation in popular culture, it would seem blacksmithing is a male-only profession. It’s not.

While women smiths are a minority, the Holkham Bible of the 1300s includes an illustration of a woman forging a nail. And this year, 30 percent of students in the Artist Blacksmith program at the Haliburton School of Art and Design are women – the same program Amy graduated from in 2016.

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Liden’s background is in fine art, graduating from OCADU in 2013 with a major in Sculpture and Installation. It was there she discovered metal as a sculpting medium. “I love how malleable metal can be,” says Amy. “I love being able to manipulate such a structural and rigid material just by changing its temperature. I think its versatility allows me to challenge myself creatively to push the limits of what has traditionally been done with blacksmithing and fabrication.”

After Haliburton, Amy moved to “The County” to apprentice with local master blacksmith Bruce Milan at Island Forge.

“I was drawn to pursue blacksmithing as a career after working with Bruce,” she says. “He showed me how to work with clients and how to apply my creativity to projects to support myself financially. Blacksmithing is steeped in history: the first evidence of smithing dates back to 1350 BC in Egypt.”

In her practice Amy strives to incorporate traditional blacksmithing techniques and design principles into her work.

“I love utilizing the forge itself to apply heat to the steel, using the anvil and hammer to forge scrolls and a variety of shapes, and the leg vise to bend and twist bars,” she says. “ I think it’s these skills that help me stand out in the community of metal fabricators.”

Amy opened her Picton-based Liden Forge last May and has been focused on commission-based custom work. And while she feels incredibly supported by her community, she recognizes she is still an anomaly:

“As a young woman blacksmith, I’ve been faced with doubt in my capabilities, but I feel like that has also driven me to keep pushing myself. I’m constantly trying to expand my knowledge so that I grow with each project and can keep taking on bigger and better projects.”

The Winter 2021 issue of Umbrella magazine is out now.

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Halifax councillors to consider smaller $3 million contribution to new Art Gallery of Nova Scotia – Halifax Examiner

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Episode 63 of The Tideline, with Tara Thorne, is published.

Josh MacDonald is a veteran of stage and screen, familiar to Halifax audiences through films and shows like Diggstown, Spinster, Little Grey Bubbles, and Sex & Violence. As a screenwriter his works include the horror film The Corridor and the coming-of-age story Faith, Fraud and Minimum Wage, which was based on his play Halo. He’s got his playwright’s hat on when he visits the show this week to discuss #IAmTheCheese, his adaptation of Robert Cormier’s 1977 bestseller. On January 30, he’ll discuss its evolution along with the show’s director, Ann-Marie Kerr, as part of Eastern Front Theatre’s Early Stages Festival.

Listen to the full episode here.

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Cornwall Hive's Art 4 All event hopes to grow – Standard Freeholder

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It might have been virtual, but the first ever Art 4 All still yielded some good results on Saturday.

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The event, organized by the Cornwall Art Hive, aimed at getting the local artistic community together to discuss the craft, create connections and of course, create. Initially, it was to be hosted at the Cornwall Square mall, but health and safety restrictions meant that it had to take place over Zoom.

Despite a smaller turnout that anticipated, Richard Salem, executive director of Your Arts Council of Cornwall and the SDG Counties (YAC), is hopeful that future Art 4 All events can be held in person.

“We felt that rather than not have anything that this would be better than nothing,” he said. “We are trying to keep the events as consistent as possible. We want to have one every month and hopefully by next month, the third Saturday, at Cornwall Square, we will have an event in person.”

In all, three local artists too part in the event — Salem, Yafa Goawily, and Liv Bigtree.

“Right now I have work showing at the Brooklyn collective which is a gallery space in North Carolina,” said Bigtree, 19. “Right now, I’m not really doing much, art-wise. I’ve been taking it easy, taking a little break.

“I like to do that when I’m not really working on big projects, I just come back to this space where I just have fun.”

  1. The Your Arts Council of Cornwall and SDG unveiled a new logo in collaboration with the Cornwall Art Hive at its general meeting on Tuesday, June 22, 2021 over Zoom. Handout/Cornwall Standard-Freeholder/Postmedia Network

    Your Arts Council struggled in pandemic, but excited for the year ahead

  2. The old Bank of Montreal building on Pitt Street on Friday July 6, 2018 in Cornwall, Ont. The building will soon become Cornwall's new arts centre.
Lois Ann Baker/Cornwall Standard-Freeholder/Postmedia Network

    YAC interested in running Cornwall’s arts centre

Goawily, which produces a wide range of visual arts, said creating art has always been relieving. She also explained that although the pandemic has created some issues for artists, it has had the effect of growing the local art movement.

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“We are growing not just with events and support, we are growing because we can reach different people – that is our main goal,” she said. “The community knows now that we are open for them.”

“Art is so important not just for artists but for everyone,” said Bigtree. “You don’t have to have specific skills. I really think that everyone is an artist. I think that it’s part of what makes us humans.

“Art is about freedom and that is what art hive is trying to create.”

Even with the pandemic, the Cornwall Art Hive and YAC still managed to host well-attended events in the summer, in Lamoureux Park. According to Salem, the happenings attracted residents from all walks of life and grew fast in popularity.

“Of course that it’s sad (pandemic restrictions), but I think that we learned to support each other more,” said Goawily. “I was new to Cornwall and did my first solo exhibition here. I find that yes, we are tiny but we are mighty. We are growing fast and we support each other truly.”

“We started buying art from each other and we had some groups going sharing what we had accomplished. We are stronger together.”

Anyone interested in gaining insight on the local art community can do so through a variety of videos uploaded to the Your Arts Council Youtube channel .

Fracine@postmedia.com

twitter.com/FrancisRacine

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