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Girl Guides: Enhanced photos need labels on social media – BBC News

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By Cristina Criddle
Technology reporter

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.css-1ecljvk-StyledFigureCopyrightposition:absolute;bottom:0;right:0;background:#3F3F42;color:#EEEEEE;padding:0.25rem 0.5rem;text-transform:uppercase;image copyrightRahi Chadda/Unsah Malik/BBC

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.css-14iz86j-BoldTextfont-weight:bold;Influencers and advertisers should be forced to declare digitally altered photos on social media, the body representing UK girl guides has said.

The Girlguiding charity has backed a proposed law by a backbench MP that would force social media users and advertisers to label images where bodies or faces have been edited.

The bill is designed to address unrealistic portrayals of beauty in the media and online.

Critics have said it is unenforceable.

The Girlguiding Advocate panel, whose members are aged 14 to 25, welcomed the proposals.

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“The ‘perfect’ images girls are encountering in their daily lives are having a devastating impact on self-esteem and confidence,” said 15-year-old panel member Alice.

“These enhanced images create a false society where how girls look is perceived to be the most important aspect about them.”

Dr Luke Evans MP, a Tory member of the Health and Social Care Committee and a GP, was inspired to introduce the bill after seeing first-hand the effects of these images on people’s mental health.

“We know how damaging this is, as you’re warping people’s perspective of reality, whether that’s slimming down for women or bulking up for men,” he added.

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Existing laws

The law would require advertisers, broadcasters or publishers to display a warning label when bodies or faces are digitally altered.

Similar legislation already exists in France. There, any commercial image that has been enhanced must feature a label of “edited photograph”, or companies face a fine.

The stock images agency Getty has also banned retouched images from its commercial category.

Dr Evans has met the Advertising Standards Agency – which has previously banned some airbrushed advertisements – and hopes to have talks with social media firms soon.

He said he would like to see rule-breakers apologise and issue a correction, or be fined.

Technology reporter Cristina Criddle in two photos, one edited and the original

image copyrightBBC/Cristina Criddle

‘Unrealistic beauty’

Some have said this would be difficult to enforce on social media, as it would rely on users policing themselves or others reporting them.

“While some pictures look obviously edited, there are still fine tweaks anyone can make, which can be hard to identify,” commented Unsah Malik, author of Slashed: The Ultimate Social Media and Influencer Marketing Guide.

“This begs the question to what extent the new rules will be put in place, and how much we can trust influencers to tell the truth.

“This then leaves us in the same position of setting unrealistic beauty standards.”

Edited selfie of Unsah Malik

image copyrightUnsah Malik

Nick Ede, a brand expert, said there should be flexibility in the rules.

“If you are specifically using a product that you are promoting, and don’t declare that you have manipulated an image, that is false advertising – for example, a face cream and you’ve smoothed out your skin,” he explained. “But if you are posting generic images that are part of your brand, then I don’t think you should have to have any kind of accountability.

“Treating people like they are a packet of cigarettes with what basically is a government health warning is just ridiculous.”

Dr Evans accepts that his recommendations would be hard to enforce.

“Just because it’s difficult in principle, doesn’t mean we should not do it,” he responded. “Social media companies have a role to play, allowing people to see what is true reality.

“These influencers have large audiences and need to be transparent – labelling content is not a huge ask.”

Image of Rahi Chadda

image copyrightRahi Chadda

Influencers have spoken out against the proposals, saying it puts too much pressure on them.

One model with more than 700,000 followers said people can follow at their own discretion.

“It is an individual’s choice how they wish to represent themselves through social media,” Rahi Chadda added.

“It impacts their own mental health also. If by editing the photos they feel more confident, then that’s a personal choice which shouldn’t be judged.

“Transparency is something which influencers are working toward at their own pace.”

The Ten Minute Rule Bill will be heard in Parliament on 15 September. If it passes, it can be incorporated into existing legislation or debated in the House of Commons.

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  • Girlguiding
  • Mental health
  • Social media influencers
  • Instagram
  • Social media

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Group wants Parliament, courts to hold social media to same standard as publishers – Campbell River Mirror

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Friends of Canadian Broadcasting is calling on Parliament to restrain social media platforms from distributing harmful or hateful content by applying the same laws that publishers and broadcasters already face.

The lobby group’s executive director says courts should be penalizing social media platforms that knowingly spread harmful content.

Daniel Bernhard made the comments shortly after Friends of Canadian Broadcasting released a research paper that argues social media platforms aren’t passive or neutral when it comes to content distribution.

The report says platforms like Facebook and YouTube routinely exercise editorial control by promoting content that users have never asked to see or sometimes conceal content without consulting users.

The report says traditional publishers can be held partly liable under Canadian law for harmful content but the same standard hasn’t been applied to internet platforms.

Facebook didn’t immediately comment on the research paper or Bernhard’s remarks.

The report was released as members of Parliament return to Ottawa this week and the Trudeau government prepares to lay out its plans for the coming session.

Among other things, Bernhard said that social media tell regulators and advertisers that they have very detailed knowledge of what’s being posted on their platforms and exercise control over what is made available to the public.

“(Facebook CEO) Mark Zuckerberg has claimed under oath that Facebook takes down 99 per cent of terrorist content before a human user ever sees it (and) 89 per cent of hate speech supposedly comes down before a human ever sees it,” Bernhard said.

He said that means Facebook in particular, and social media in general, should have the same responsibility to abide by Canadian laws as conventional publishers and broadcasters.

“If a judge finds that the content is illegal and that a platform has amplified it, the platform should be held responsible. And not only that, but that the penalty should be commensurate to their revenue and size so it hurts accordingly,” Bernhard said.

David Paddon, The Canadian Press

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'Trillion Dollar Team' is the social media page you must follow to pursue your dreams – Net Newsledger

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Whats the best way to stay on track towards bringing your dreams to reality? As per available data and expert comments, it is anything which acts as a continuous or timely reminder of the goals. It ensures one stays motivated and takes away any chances of complacency. As per its founder, this is the idea behind the Instagram account ‘The Trillion Dollar Team’

This is a community page and posts pictures of lavish lifestyle which are nothing short of goals for everyone. These pictures usually include swanky cars, private jets, picturesque homes, limited edition watches, dream destinations, etc. The instagram handle for this account is @the.tdt

In a candid conversation, the founder of this page shared his idea behind starting this page. He said none of the pictures belong to him however are pictures he would like to click someday. Also, he believes that its better to post these at a community level on social media because all these pictures combined will inspire everyone assoociated with the account and shall bring positive reinforcement for everyone.

In a candid conversation he stated, “I hace started this community with a goal to remind like minded people of their goals on a daily basis. A personal collection of these pictures and wall photos would have been effective for me but why restrict the posutive vibes to myself when I can share them with everyone in the world. The pictures you see on this account do not belong to me and are handpicked from different sources and shared here for purely inspirational purposes. Most of the times, I receive great love from the owners of the actual photos as my posts appreciate their achievements and respect people for having a lifestyle that is a dream for millions of people.”

It is worth mentioning that such accounts have been loved by the masses and have found great success in the past as well. In early 2015, an internet community titled ‘Rich kids of snapchat’ based on a similar idea of one stop collection of all thats amazing gained immense success and has inspired various creators worldwide.

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Group wants Parliament, courts to hold social media to same standard as publishers – Yorkton This Week

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TORONTO — Friends of Canadian Broadcasting is calling on Parliament to restrain social media platforms from distributing harmful or hateful content by applying the same laws that publishers and broadcasters already face.

The lobby group’s executive director says courts should be penalizing social media platforms that knowingly spread harmful content.

article continues below

Daniel Bernhard made the comments shortly after Friends of Canadian Broadcasting released a research paper that argues social media platforms aren’t passive or neutral when it comes to content distribution.

The report says platforms like Facebook and YouTube routinely exercise editorial control by promoting content that users have never asked to see or sometimes conceal content without consulting users.

The report says traditional publishers can be held partly liable under Canadian law for harmful content but the same standard hasn’t been applied to internet platforms.

Facebook didn’t immediately comment on the research paper or Bernhard’s remarks.

The report was released as members of Parliament return to Ottawa this week and the Trudeau government prepares to lay out its plans for the coming session.

Among other things, Bernhard said that social media tell regulators and advertisers that they have very detailed knowledge of what’s being posted on their platforms and exercise control over what is made available to the public.

“(Facebook CEO) Mark Zuckerberg has claimed under oath that Facebook takes down 99 per cent of terrorist content before a human user ever sees it (and) 89 per cent of hate speech supposedly comes down before a human ever sees it,” Bernhard said.

He said that means Facebook in particular, and social media in general, should have the same responsibility to abide by Canadian laws as conventional publishers and broadcasters.

“If a judge finds that the content is illegal and that a platform has amplified it, the platform should be held responsible. And not only that, but that the penalty should be commensurate to their revenue and size so it hurts accordingly,” Bernhard said.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Sept. 21, 2020.

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