adplus-dvertising
Connect with us

News

Girl Guides of Canada to rename its Brownies program to be more inclusive

Published

 on

The Girl Guides of Canada announced Tuesday they will be renaming their Brownies branch to be more inclusive.

“We made that decision because we heard from girls and from former members and current members that the name caused them harm,” Jill Zelmanovits, the CEO of Girl Guides of Canada, told CBC News.

Zelmanovits said talks about changing the name began in 2020 during the pandemic. She said she heard some girls wanted to be members, but the name didn’t make them feel like they belong.

“Sometimes that meant that they would join when they were younger and then skip over that particular branch, sometimes it meant they would delay joining the organization all together until after that branch or sometimes they just wouldn’t come at all,” Zelmanovits said.

300x250x1

In a news release, the organization said the move was an “important and necessary step to creating an inclusive and equitable space where every racialized girl in Canada feels like they belong and are welcome in guiding.”

Girl Guides of Canada said it has consulted with “racialized members, past members and the community and will be calling on current members to help decide on a new branch name.”

Girl Guides of Canada CEO Jill Zelmanovits is pictured in the organization’s Toronto headquarters on Wednesday. Girl Guides will be renaming their Brownies branch to be more inclusive. (Evan Mitsui/CBC)

The new name for the program for girls aged seven and eight has not yet been decided. In late November, members will be invited to help choose from a shortlist of two names, according to the Girl Guides website. The new name will be announced in January and will take effect in September 2023.

“The two shortlisted names are inclusive, fun, and reflect how girls see themselves in Guiding,” the website reads.

Girl Guides of Canada badges on display at the organization’s Toronto headquarters. (Evan Mitsui/CBC)

“These names came from themes which were developed in consultation with racialized girls in Guiding, the National Indigenous Advisory Circle, community partners and organizations, as well as GGC National Youth Council, Provincial Commissioners and Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Facilitators.”

Zelmanovits said the uniform will stay the same, but it won’t have the name Brownies on it anymore.

Critics of the change say the origin of the name has nothing to do with race. Brownies are fairies in Scottish folklore.

Zelmanovits said she understands people feel nostalgia for the name.

“Their experiences won’t change. So the fun programming, the camping, the STEM [science, technology, engineering and mathematics] , the arts and crafts. All of that is going to stay the same. And for the women who have those memories, those don’t have to change either,” Zelmanovits said.

“The only thing that’s changing is the name. And we’re really hoping this means more girls will be able to make more of those amazing memories these women have.”

Source link

Continue Reading

News

Delissio pizza, other Nestle products will soon be gone in Canada – CTV News

Published

 on


[unable to retrieve full-text content]

Delissio pizza, other Nestle products will soon be gone in Canada  CTV News

728x90x4

Source link

Continue Reading

News

It's not delivery, it's discontinued: Nestlé to stop selling Delissio pizza in Canada – CBC News

Published

 on


[unable to retrieve full-text content]

It’s not delivery, it’s discontinued: Nestlé to stop selling Delissio pizza in Canada  CBC News

728x90x4

Source link

Continue Reading

News

Will winter end soon? Canadian groundhogs split on spring calls

Published

 on

Groundhog Day didn’t go to script in Canada this year: one died before making a prediction, while others were divided over whether spring will come early this year.

Quebec’s Fred la Marmotte died before he was able to reveal his prediction Thursday, with volunteer children stepping in to take its place.

The organizer of the event, Roberto Blondin, said the famed groundhog had no vital signs when he went to wake it Wednesday night. Fred la Marmotte likely died during hibernation, Blondin said. Fred was honoured with a plush animal toy by organizers.

300x250x1

The group of children predicted six more weeks of winter, joining the calls from other groundhogs across Canada – except for three.

Folklore states that if a groundhog sees its shadow on Groundhog Day, winter will drag on. If it doesn’t spot its shadow, spring-like weather arrive soon.

Ontario’s Wiarton Willie called for an early spring Thursday morning, as did Alberta’s Blazac Billy. Organizers chanted “Billy, Billy, Billy” to get Billy – a mascot – out of his burrow. In British Columbia, stuffed groundhog Okanagan Okie also called for an early spring.

Their furry counterpart in Nova Scotia, Shubenacadie Sam, saw her shadow as she emerged from a snow-covered enclosure at a wildlife park north of Halifax. In Manitoba, the stuffed groundhog Merv saw his shadow, as did Punxsutawney Phil in the United States.

 

Groundhog Day isn’t just for groundhogs

In Nova Scotia, Lucy the Lobster crawled out of the ocean at Cape Sable Island Causeway at 8 a.m. local time, and saw her shadow, organizers said.

In a playful, peer-reviewed study published by the American Meteorological Society, researchers at Lakehead University in Thunder Bay, Ont., found groundhogs are “beyond a shadow of a doubt” no better at predicting spring’s arrival than flipping a coin.

— with files from Global News’ Alex Cooke, Brayden Jagger Haines and The Canadian Press

728x90x4

Source link

Continue Reading

Trending