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'Go back to Canada': Chinese social media blasts lecturer over video of drunken rant at police – National Post

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A part-time lecturer with a prestigious Canadian business school drunkenly yelled at police in China to shoot him — ‘like a Canadian policeman’

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In the ongoing saga of Canada’s fractured relations with China, it is undoubtedly one of the oddest chapters.

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A part-time lecturer with a prestigious Canadian business school drunkenly yelled at police in China to shoot him — like he said officers in Canada would do — in an incident that was captured live on video and went viral across Chinese social media.

What appears to have been the quarrelsome antics of an inebriated Canadian soon turned into a chance for Chinese citizens to vent about ill-mannered foreigners.

Angry internet users urged the data-analytics expert, who founded a company in China, to go back to Canada, calling him “trash” and arrogant.

“These fake foreign devils are rampant in China; who gave them the courage?” asked a commenter on one blog site. “To earn money from the Chinese, but also to scold China! Deportation, never entry!”

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“Canada can’t really produce any good things,” wrote another.


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  2. Ambassador of China to Canada Cong Peiwu speaks as part of a panel at the Ottawa Conference on Security and Defence in Ottawa, on Wednesday, March 4, 2020. Cong says Canada acted as a

    ‘A self-centred giant baby’: How China is bashing Canada

The teacher of marketing data courses at York University’s Schulich School of Business “solemnly” apologized to police in the city of Qingdao — part of the eastern Shandong province — for the trouble caused by his “improper” remarks.

Police had stopped the driver of the car he was in, part of an operation set up in response to a local beer festival, various local media reported.

The individual, Ryan Zhao, could not be reached for comment.

Schulich said Zhao taught a course this summer but is not slated to do so in the fall semester.

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“The school is looking into the matter and considering next steps,” said a spokesman for the Toronto-based institution.

The incident occurred just after the high-profile detention of Chinese-Canadian pop star Kris Wu on suspicion of sexual assault, a coincidence many anti-Canada online commenters were quick to point out.

Zhao, also known as Zhao Qiang, is listed on his LinkedIn page as the founder of Chinese start-up JMREX Data Technology and as a marketing instructor at Schulich, which calls itself Canada’s “preeminent business school.”

Course outlines on Schulich and other websites indicate he has taught classes there on the use of data analysis in marketing at least since 2014.

The LinkedIn profile indicates he has Masters degrees from the University of Toronto and Guelph University and has worked for Telus, Toronto Dominion bank and Shoppers Drug Mart, but is currently based in Zhejiang, China.

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The National Post could not locate a full version of the video of the Canadian, only short clips and GIFs from it posted online.

But according to Chinese media reports, Zhao got out of the car he was in after police in Qingdao’s Laoshan district stopped the vehicle on July 30 and heatedly confronted an officer with a camera. It turned out she was broadcasting video live on the internet.

Speaking Mandarin, he told her that he is a teacher and a Canadian, before making his unusual suggestion.

“You can draw your gun and shoot like a Canadian policeman.… Why don’t you do this?” reported info.51.ca, a Toronto-based Chinese-language news site. “I’m Canadian, you can shoot me, shoot me, no problem. Ah, you are a policeman and you can do whatever you want.”

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The video also shows an officer trying to push a recalcitrant Zhao off the road, which causes him to exclaim “so rude.”

In a statement he posted later on Weibo, China’s Twitter equivalent, Zhao acknowledged he had caused adverse effects with his improper words and deeds. “I solemnly apologize to the Laoshan traffic police,” he said, adding in a longer statement that he had already visited the station to say he was sorry.

But most of the 13,000 comments posted after his statement showed little sympathy, suggesting he was a self-important foreigner who considers himself superior to Chinese people — despite his ethnic Chinese background.

“On the one hand, this kind of person looks down on Chinese people and on the other hand they want to return to China to make money,” said one commenter. “Their heart is really distorted.”

“You should go back and let the Canadian police shoot you, so as not to pollute this land,” said another.

And in a similar vein: “Didn’t you say that you want to be shot? Sober now, jump into the sea and die.”

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City of Brandon – September 18th Media Release – City of Brandon –

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For the last 24 hours: 

Stolen Vehicle Recovered:

At about 9:30 AM Friday morning, a vehicle stolen from Winnipeg was located unoccupied in the 300 block Louise Avenue, by a member on patrol.  The vehicle was seized and towed to BPS where it was subjected to a forensic examination.

Fire in Apartment Complex:

At 1:12 PM Friday, a resident of an apartment within 1400 Pacific Avenue reported fire alarms were sounding in his unit.  Members attended and found an active fire within the suite, which was quickly extinguished.  Investigation revealed that the fire was caused accidentally when the tenant set a bag of groceries on the stove, incidentally turning a burner on, which ignited some of the contents of the grocery bag.

Arrest Warrants Executed:

A 41 year-old male was arrested on the strength of an arrest warrant on Friday evening after being checked in the 1000 block Victoria Avenue.  A police records checked showed he was wanted for failing to attend for identification.  He was processed and released to appear in court on a later date.

A 33 year-old female rom Winnipeg was arrested for possession of property obtained by crime after a vehicle was stopped on the TransCanada Highway.  An arrest warrant, held by the Winnipeg Police Service for the noted offence, was returned during a records query.  The accused was released from custody to appear in court in Winnipeg on December 14th.

An unendorsed warrant for arrest for a 36 year-old Brandon man was executed just before 2:00 AM this morning.  The male was wanted for failing to comply with conditions of an undertaking.  He was held in custody and will appear before the court today.

Boissevain RCMP arrested a 61 year-old male resident of Hartney, MB on the strength of an arrest warrant held by BPS, for failing to attend court.  The accused was later released from custody and is scheduled to appear in court on November 29th.

Ste Rose RCMP arrested a 43 year-old male during the course of an investigation and learned that BPS held an endorsed warrant for arrest for failing to attend for identification.  The accused will appear before the court today on all charges.

Failing to Comply with Orders:

A 22 year-old female was checked by police in the 0-00 block 10th Street just before midnight Friday night.  She was found to be bound by an undertaking that included a daily curfew condition, which the accused was breaching.  She was processed and released to appear in court on December 16th.

A 47 year-old male was also arrested for violating a curfew condition of a release order.  At 4:20 AM this morning, the accused was located in the 0-00 block 9th Street, well outside of his 9:00 PM – 8:00 AM curfew. He too was processed and released to appear in court on December 16th.

Others:

Four males were held overnight under the Intoxicated Persons Detention Act after being located in separate incidents, and being intoxicated to the point they were unable to safely care for themselves.  They will be released once they are more sober.

RELEASE AUTHORIZED BY:

Acting Staff Sergeant D. Lockkhart, #101

B Platoon

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 

Anyone with information on any unsolved crime is asked to call Brandon Crime Stoppers at 204-727-(TIPS) 8477, www.brandoncrimestoppers.com or by texting BCSTIP and your message to CRIMES (274637).  Crime Stoppers pays up to $2000.00 cash for information that leads to the solution of a crime.

CRIME STOPPERS 204-727-TIPS

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How the party platforms compare on future of CBC, media supports – CBC.ca

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The media, including broadcasting and streaming, were the topic of much debate in the months leading into the election. 

Of particular interest to the public was Bill C-10, which was introduced by the Liberals and would have required many digital media companies to promote Canadian content. The bill was controversial, and it did not become law before the election was called.

Debates have raged during the Liberal government about whether Canada’s media industry should receive government support as ad revenues fall, and whether CBC/Radio-Canada should change its programming and funding model.

The parties have made some significant pledges when it comes to media and the public broadcaster. Here are the highlights:

Liberals

If the Liberals are re-elected, their platform pledges to introduce legislation that would require digital platforms, such as  Facebook, to share a portion of revenue generated from news content with Canadian news outlets.

“This legislation would be based on the Australian model and level the playing field between global platforms and Canadians news outlets,” the platform says.

Similarly, the Liberals are pledging to reintroduce legislation to change Canada’s Broadcasting Act. They’ll make it a requirement for foreign web giants, such as YouTube and Netflix, to promote Canadian content.

Most parties are proposing that web giants such as Facebook contribute financially to the Canadian media industry. (Paul Sakuma / The Associated Press)

The Liberals are also promising to extend insurance coverage related to the COVID-19 pandemic for media production stoppages. They also say they’ll double the government’s current contribution of to the Canada Media Fund to support Canadian television production.

When it comes to CBC, the Liberals want to “update CBC/Radio-Canada’s mandate to ensure that it is meeting the needs and expectations of today’s Canadian audiences with unique programming that distinguishes it from private broadcasters.”

They say they’ll provide $400 million over four years to CBC with the aim of making the public broadcaster less reliant on private advertising during news and current affairs programs.

At a press conference in Aurora, Ont., on Monday, Justin Trudeau said his party will always support the media.

“I am happy to stand here and defend the work that media does as an essential part of our democracy,” he said. “We will always be there to support and thank members of the press for doing the important work of bringing things forward, of challenging all parties and anyone who wants to lead this country, and holding leaders to account.”

Conservatives

Like the Liberals, the Conservatives are also proposing that Google and Facebook pay royalties for Canadian news content — adding that they will look at best practices from countries that have taken a similar approach, such as Australia and France.

They’ll also do a “full review” of the CRTC’s mandate, with a focus of “ensuring that it better reflects the needs of Canadians and doesn’t prevent Canadian broadcasters from innovating and adapting to changes in the market.”

They’re promising to repeal Bill C-10, which was the Liberal effort to require web giants to promote Canadian content. Instead, they are promising an alternative approach that would require digital streaming services to reinvest a “significant” amount of their Canadian revenue into making original Canadian programs.

The Conservatives are pledging to end the media bailout initiated by the Trudeau government in 2019, when it  set aside nearly $600 million over five years to support media outlets.

“While we support Canadian media outlets, they should not be directly receiving tax dollars,” their platform reads. “Government funding of ‘approved’ media undermines press freedom, a vital part of a free society.”

When it comes to CBC, the Conservatives pledge to review the mandate of CBC English TV, including CBC News Network, and also English digital news. The platform adds that the review would look at the viability of a “public interest model like that of PBS in the United States, ensuring that it no longer competes with private Canadian broadcasters and digital providers.”

They’re also proposing a separate legal and administrative structure for Radio-Canada, while also ensuring the French-language broadcaster does not charge user fees for its streaming services or operate a sponsored content department.

The Conservatives are proposing a review of CBC’s English TV and digital news operations. (Mark Blinch/Reuters)

At an announcement in Saint John earlier this week, O’Toole said he does not believe CBC should compete with the private sector in certain areas.

“The public interest mandate is critical in terms of rural communities being connected, in terms of keeping Canadians informed, and that’s the public interest side I like,” he said.

“What I don’t like is competition with the private sector that is holding on by a thread … in English television and in digital, competing and hollowing out jobs in the private sector, leading to less choice, less options, less voices.”

He also reaffirmed that his government would end public financial support for media outlets.

“We also have to look to end the direct government supports to media, but work with them to try and make sure they transition to the digital space, to this new media environment,” he said. “We need to balance the playing field with the American web giants, and we will do that, while protecting freedom of speech and Internet freedom.”

NDP

The NDP are also promising changes to the Broadcasting Act, with an aim of creating “a level playing field between Canadian broadcasters and foreign streaming giants,” according to its platform.

The platform says the party will make Netflix, Facebook, Google and other digital media companies pay corporate taxes and contribute to Canadian content in both English and French.

“Most Canadians now get their news from Facebook, and Netflix is the largest broadcaster in the country,” the platform says. “But despite the Liberals promising to take action, these web giants still don’t pay the same taxes or contribute to funding Canadian content in the same way traditional media do.”

The party says it will put a priority on partnering with independent Canadian producers and on increasing funding for TeleFilm and the Canada Media Fund, although it doesn’t say how much.

The NDP is pledging to increasing funding for CBC and Radio-Canada “to help reverse the damage of decades of funding cuts under both Liberal and Conservative governments.” The platform doesn’t specify an amount.

But in an interview with the advocacy group Friends of Canadian Broadcasting, Singh said he’d look into bringing funding for the public broadcaster to levels seen in other countries.

“I want us to get to a point where we’re not among the lowest funded in the world. We need to be competitive with what other jurisdictions are doing. … We want to have properly funded, well-funded public broadcasting,” he said. “I’m definitely prepared to increase [funding].”

People’s Party

The People’s Party has said during the campaign that it would end the media bailout “to guarantee that Canada has a free and independent press,” according to a news release from the party.

With regard to CBC/Radio-Canada, the People’s Party would either defund and privatize it, or it would change the funding model to a partly donor-driven one like those with NPR and PBS in the United States.

“What we need are free and independent media, not media that are dependent on the government for their survival and profitability,” PPC Leader Maxime Bernier said in a statement.

Greens

The Green platform says the party is in favour of regulating social media platforms and streaming services through the CRTC “as envisioned in Bill C-10.”

The party also wants the CRTC to reserve more bandwidth for independent and non-profit stations, and it is pledging to create an independent commission to study the concentration of media ownership in Canada.

With respect to CBC, the party says it will “provide a stable base-funding” for CBC’s English and French operations, but additionally wants to see programs in Indigenous languages and programming that encourages learning of Indigenous languages.

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Social media strategies played important role in pandemic election: experts – CTV News

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Bakhtawar Khan excitedly waited, her friend holding two cellphones and a camera, for her turn to get a photo with NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh.

The 20-year-old, like most people showing up to political rallies across the country, wanted to share the image with friends and followers on social media.

“I feel like a lot of people are telling me not to vote for NDP because it will be a split with the Liberals,” Khan said. “But the way I look at social media, I don’t think it will be true this year.”

Khan, like people across the country, says she gets all her political and election information from social media.

During the COVID-19 pandemic, people have been spending even more time on their social media and all the political parties are hoping to take advantage to tap directly into their voter base. But just because someone likes or shares a political post doesn’t necessarily translate at the polls.

Experts across the country are watching to see which party’s social media strategy paid off the most on election day.

Half of Canadians, regardless of age, use Facebook weekly to get news on current events and politics, said Oksana Kishchuk, a consultant with Abacus Data.

Social media has become a vital player in building support. It’s not just about posting either, she said, as parties have to consider good photos, snappy clips and current trends.

“Mastering these techniques will be important,” Kishchuk said.

As election day comes closer, she says all three main parties are taking the strategy of “target and spend.” In the last week or so, each has spent $400,000 to $600,000 on advertisements on Facebook and Instagram. The Liberals and NDP are using that cash to share messages focusing mainly on their own strengths, while the Conservatives have put a focus on Justin Trudeau, she said.

 The most recent polling by Abacus shows Liberals in the lead with their social media strategy, Kishchuk said, but impressions of Singh and Conservative Leader Erin O’Toole rose significantly during the election.

In particular, Kishchuk said she’s interested to see the outcome of the New Democrats focus on TikTok to connect with younger voters.

“Very few (users) are using TikTok as a main source for news,” she added.

Tori Rivard says she joined the app because of Singh after seeing “a lot of hype” from the leader through her friends’ social media accounts. Now, she is excited about the party and even showed up to a campaign stop in Ontario.

“I think it’s super important especially with millennials and gen Z because social media is how we get all of our information pretty much,” Rivard said. “So (Singh) being engaged on there makes us more likely to seek out more information elsewhere.”

Tamara Small, a professor of political science at the University of Guelph, said she thinks TikTok as a campaign strategy is more of a “stunt” and will be less influential at the ballot box.

“As a tool of persuasion, it’s a bunch of people who cannot vote, and a bunch of people who, if they can vote, don’t likely vote,” she said. “So, thank goodness it’s free because you wouldn’t want to spend money there.”

Small also cautioned that social media can get party faithful excited but has less impact on flipping people’s partisanship.

“The whole thing is a big echo chamber,” she said.

“If you are going to go on social media you are unlikely to follow the leader of the party that’s ‘the worst’ because why would you do that to yourself.”

Social media is a double-edged sword for political parties, said Kim Speers, a professor at the University of Victoria. It has the potential to garner new support by sharing what the party stands for

“It also has the potential to decrease support if negative (information) is found on a current candidate’s social media account or if the messaging is or can be negatively misinterpreted,” she said.

Both the Conservatives and the New Democrats removed candidates or saw them resign because of their social media history.

All parties are taking a hybrid approach, she said, which includes social media ads, videoconferencing and in-person campaigning. She said NDP are focusing on new social media platforms, the Liberals have a more traditional approach with things like Facebook ads and the Conservatives are using a virtual approach, with online question-and-answer sessions and rallies.

The mix is important, Speers said, because when it comes to social media the parties “may have followers but they need voters more.”

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Sept. 18, 2021.

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