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Google Chrome Android App Now Being Used for 2-Step Verification for Signing In to a New Device: Report – Gadgets 360

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Google Chrome Android app is now reportedly being used as a 2-Step Verification (2SV) or 2-factor authentication (2FA) method for signing in to a new device. Till now, Google offered a few ways to verify a user, which included Google prompts, voice or text messages, backup codes, and an authenticator app. Google Chrome now seems to be the latest addition to the list. It is a bit different from the regular Google prompt notification method as it mentions a “nearby device” which means it is using GPS to locate the user and the device.

According to a report by 9to5Google, Chrome on Android is now being used in 2SV to verify a user’s identity. The publication notes that when logging in to a laptop with your Google credentials, the user will receive a prompt on their phone asking if they are trying to sign in — as is the case with the regular Google prompts — but the next step where the verification process takes a bit to verify the user is actually using Chrome instead of Google Play Services.

It seems like Google is using GPS to locate the user and the device they are trying to sign in to as the prompt now shows “Someone is trying to sign in to your account from a nearby device” — ‘nearby device’ being the differentiating factor between this and the regular Google prompts. The report adds that Google is using caBLE (cloud-assisted Bluetooth Low Energy) as well as requiring a user to be signed in through the same account and have Chrome Sync enabled.

This feature has not rolled out to a wider base just yet and 9to5Google claimed to have tested it out on Chrome 93 beta on Android and Chrome version 92 for macOS.

2SV or 2FA adds another layer of security that goes beyond just entering your password. It can protect your account in case someone else gets access to your password by requiring an additional step to verify who is actually trying to log in.


For the latest tech news and reviews, follow Gadgets 360 on Twitter, Facebook, and Google News. For the latest videos on gadgets and tech, subscribe to our YouTube channel.


Vineet Washington writes about gaming, smartphones, audio devices, and new technologies for Gadgets 360, out of Delhi. Vineet is a Senior Sub-editor for Gadgets 360, and has frequently written about gaming on all platforms and new developments in the world of smartphones. In his free time, Vineet likes to play video games, make clay models, play the guitar, watch sketch-comedy, and anime. Vineet is available on vineetw@ndtv.com, so please send in your leads and tips.
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Wordle Word Today 19, May 2022: Wordle Word Hints and Today's Answer – Landscape Insight

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With just over 30 days to the 365th day of Wordle, some have found the year-long stretch to be a slog, and then some. Maintaining that kind of streak is impressive.

The 334th word of the day may be so simple that it is difficult to guess. We’ve got you covered if you’re having trouble figuring out what the word of the day is on Wordle. Here’s how to solve Wordle 334.

Hints for Wordle May 19

Here are some clues to assist you in finding Wordle 334:

  • Only one vowel appears in this term.
  • A letter repeats in this vowel.
  • This term serves as both a noun and a verb.
  • The second definition of this word is “a drinking vessel.”
  • There is only one syllable in this term.

Also Read: What Is Today’s Wordle Word for 16 May 2022?

Today’s Wordle 334 Answer

What Is Today’s Wordle Word for 16 May 2022?

If you still can’t figure out the answer to today’s Wordle, scroll down to see the answer to Wordle 334 for May 19, 2022.

GLASS is the answer to the Wordle of May 19th.

How Does Wordle Work?

Wordle is a daily word guessing game in which you have only six attempts to guess the word of the day. Every word in the game is five letters long and only exists in English.

Wordle will provide you clues based on the letters you’ve chosen correctly for each word you enter into the game.

Start with words that have a lot of vowels in them to make the game easier for you. Because many English five-letter words only have one vowel, you’ll have plenty of areas to work with if you start with five-letter terms like “AUDIO.”

What Is Today’s Wordle Word for 16 May 2022?

What Is Today’s Wordle Word for 16 May 2022?

When you’re trying to figure out the word of the day, Wordle will put a green box around your letter to indicate that you’ve entered the proper letter in the correct location.

A yellow box around your letter indicates that you have the correct letter, but it is not in the proper location. And if your letter is surrounded by a grey box, that implies the letter isn’t in the word you’re guessing for.

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Sony Reveals Vision for the Metaverse – Push Square

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You’ve probably heard of the metaverse by now. While this is a buzzword for virtually every major organisation on the planet, there are various different definitions of what it actually means. For Mark Zuckerberg and his Facebook hellscape, it’s an interactive world in which you’ll socialise and go to work. Sony’s concept, fortunately, is a little less dystopian.

Speaking as part of a corporate strategy meeting, CEO Kenichiro Yoshida of course touched upon the concept – and believes his company is well-placed to play a leading role in the emerging trend. As part of his keynote, he referenced Fortnite several times, explaining how subsidiaries like PlayStation, Sony Pictures, and Sony Music have all contributed to the Battle Royale to create interactive experiences.

Yoshida’s vision of the metaverse is a “social space and live network space where games, music, movies, and anime intersect” – all products that Sony has an active role in, of course. He was clear that his concept of the metaverse is one where people come together to share “time and space” – a virtual concert, for example.

While he stopped short of revealing any specific products, he spoke at length about PlayStation’s plan to develop ten live service games, and how Destiny developer Bungie’s expertise will help influence its efforts. Effectively, it sounds like the company intends to leverage its various multimedia divisions to create interactive experiences that unite all aspects of its businesses.

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New Apple ad targets data brokers – TechCrunch

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Apple is doubling down on raising consumer awareness of privacy risks in a new ad campaign, unveiled today, which puts the spotlight on how the data broker industry trades in mobile users’ personal data — from selling browsing history and shopping habits, to location data, contacts and plenty more besides.

The campaign also highlights a number of features Apple has developed to counter this background trade in web users’ information by giving iOS users’ tools they can use to counter tracking — such as Mail Privacy Protection, which helps users combat email trackers; and App Tracking Transparency (ATT), which lets them request that third party apps do not track their mobile activity.

The new 90-second ad spot will run globally this summer on broadcast and social media across 24 countries, per Apple, which also said the campaign will include related creative being splashed across billboards.

In a press screening of the ad ahead of today’s launch the iPhone maker said the goal is to show how features it’s developed can help iOS users protect their privacy by taking back control over their personal data.

The ad (which can be seen in the embedded video below) casts the data broker industry as a gaggle of “dubious” ‘human trackers’ — who the protagonist, a consumer called Ellie, whom we meet as she’s shopping for records, stumbles upon engaged in a backroom auction.

Shock horror! — or, well, zero surprise to those of us who are more than casually online — it’s her personal data that’s going under the hammer.

[embedded content]

In the ad, the smirking audience of data brokers can be seen making bids for Ellie’s ‘digital items’ — including her drug store purchases, emails she’s opened, details of her late night messaging habits and the contact data of her nana (as well as, presumably, the rest of her address book). With mounting horror at the sale of her private information, Ellie is shown activating features on her iPhone, including the aforementioned Mail Privacy Protection — which result in the data brokers vanishing in a puff of smoke, until, eventually, the room has been cleaned out.

The advert makes a decent stab at trying to get consumers to understand — and thus care — about a murky trade that’s designed to strip away their privacy by tracking their daily activity and trading and triangulating different bundles of information gleaned about them to create highly detailed per-person profiles — which may contain thousands of inferred characteristics.

It does this by dramatizing what is undoubtedly an exceptionally intrusive trade as an in-person auction for a single consumer’s data. Of course the reality is that most tracking (and trading) is done at scale, with trackers invisibly baked into everyday services, both online (via technologies such as tracking cookies and pixels) and offline (data gathered via card payment firms can and is sold to brokers) — so it can be hard for consumers to understand the real-world implications of technologies like cookies. Or know there’s an entire data broker industry that’s busy buying and selling their info for a fat profit.

The ad is perhaps not as instantly powerful as an earlier tracking-focused ad — in which Apple depicted trackers as an ever-growing crowd of stalkers, who inserted themselves, rudely and without asking, into an iPhone user’s personal space — watching them and taking notes on their daily activity.

One narrative challenge for Apple with this latest privacy-focused ad is it can’t show Ellie using a rival device — which could help explain how come so much of her info is being tracked in the first place.

That said, many of Apple’s privacy features do require the user to opt in to obtain the slated protections — not all, though (Safari’s Intelligent Tracking Prevention feature is on by default, for example) — so even iOS users need to take proactive action to get the best level of protection possible. Hence there’s value in Apple shelling out to drive awareness of privacy — both for existing iOS users, as well as in the hopes of encouraging Android users to make the switch.

The tech giant has made pro-privacy messaging an increasingly important plank of its brand over the past five years or so, leaning into blistering attacks on what CEO Tim Cook memorably dubbed the “data industrial complex” back in a major 2018 keynote speech.

It’s a stance that has become an essential differentiator for a premium brand in a world of commoditized mobile devices and services. But it also brings Cupertino into conflict not only with adtech giants like Google and Facebook — the latter’s revenue was reported to have taken a hit after Apple launched ATT, for example — but with developers themselves, many of whom rely on ads to monetize free apps and do that by being plugged into the tracking and targeting adtech ecosystem Apple is busy warning consumers against.

The company also risks straining relations with carriers — many of whom are themselves implicated in privacy-hostile tracking of users — after it debuted a VPN-like, network proxy encrypted browsing feature for iCloud+, called Private Relay last year. The feature, which is still in beta, is designed to prevent ISPs from loggings web users’ browsing data — and it’s notable that certain carriers (and countries) have been reported blocking access.

Private Relay does not feature in Apple’s new ad on data brokers. Asked about this Apple said it necessarily had to limit the number of features it focused on to fit the 90-second ad format. It also noted that as well as the feature still being in beta it needs in-region partners for it to work as smoothly as possible — which is a network Apple said it’s still building out.

Certain of Apple’s privacy flexes — most notably ATT — have also drawn attention from competition regulators, following ad industry complaints. So there are wider reasons for Cupertino to be keen for its pro-consumer actions to be viewed through a privacy (rather than an anti-competition) lens.

Earlier this year, an interesting research paper found that Apple and other large companies had been able to increase their market power as a result of the ATT feature giving individual users more control over what third parties could do with their data — linking better consumer privacy to more concentrated data collection. Although the researchers also found evidence of the tracking industry trying to evolve its tactics to circumvent a user denial of tracking.

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