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Google Tensor SoC And Pixel 6 Benchmarks Show Google’s Intentions For Building Its Own SoC – Forbes

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We recently covered some of the details around Google’s Tensor SoC at the launch of the Pixel 6 and Tensor SoC that Google had. But now the embargo for reviews has lifted and I’ve had an opportunity to test the Pixel 6 and Pixel 6 Pro’s tensor SoC. Many people believe that Google’s Tensor SoC is more akin to a Samsung Exynos semi-custom design and according to some code that Anandtech’s Andrei Frumusanu found, it probably is along those lines. It seems odd that Google would try to claim the SoC as their own even though Samsung is heavily involved in the manufacturing and modem and likely some of the chip design as well. Nevertheless, Google’s intentions with the Tensor SoC is to derive some of the AI performance and intelligence that it has created with the TPU and bring that down into a mobile SoC. Google claimed that nobody in the market was creating chips that satisfied Google’s needs for AI performance, so they created their own. 

It has been covered numerous times, but just as a refresher the Tensor SoC is a combination of off-the-shelf ARM CPU cores and GPU cores combined with Google’s own TPU and ISP. Google hasn’t really given details about the TPU or ISP’s full capabilities, but that’s what benchmarks and reviews are for. I had a chance to use the Pixel 6 Pro and Pixel 6 for the last week or so and the camera performance genuinely lives up to what people expect out of a flagship smartphone. However, I still wanted to benchmark the device to assess the chip’s actual performance against some of the most notable Android competition. One note, the Galaxy S21 Ultra in the US ships with a Snapdragon 888 and not an Exynos 2100 like many other parts of the world. Additionally, the RedMagic 6S Pro that I tested is the only Snapdragon 888+ device.

Benchmark tests & Methodology

For my testing, I ran GeekBench, GeekBench ML, 3DMark Wildlife, 3DMark Wildlife Stress Test and PCMark. I chose GeekBench because it’s a simple CPU benchmark and can show how Google’s decision to go with two Cortex X1 cores and two A76 cores instead of one X1 and three A78s affected overall CPU performance. To Google’s point, the company has said that it does not actually care about individual SoC component tests but rather a complete system AI test. And when you consider how few AI benchmarks are out there and ones that are easy to run, GeekBench ML was an easy decision. The important part in choosing GeekBench ML was not to test CPU or GPU performance individually, but instead to test them together using the NNAPI test which is Google’s own API that it uses for ML acceleration. This feels like the perfect test to use to compare AI performance across devices, especially since it does multiple types of ML workloads and tests FP32, INT16 and INT8 performance. 3DMark was important because it is cross-platform and the standard for 3D graphics performance, especially in gaming. I also chose to use the stress test because thermal throttling is a real problem with some mobile SoCs and sustained performance is more relevant than a 60 second benchmark. After that, I wanted to run something that was more of a system-level benchmark that considers all the different types of usages a user might have so I ran PCMark for Android. All benchmarks were run at least 3 times to normalize scores for any kind of variance except for 3DMark Wildlife Stress Test since it runs a 20-loop test. Also, the ZTE/Nubia RedMagic 6S Pro has an active cooled fan that automatically runs whenever graphically intensive applications are open, so it did turn on the fan for the 3DMark and PCMark tests but not for the GeekBench results. Additionally, I turned off benchmark boosting mode on the ASUS and Snapdragon Insider devices. Final note, all Pixel devices are running the latest version of Android 12 while the others are still on Android 11, which may represent a small performance difference.

GeekBench 5

Geekbench runs a single core and multi-core benchmark to test CPU performance. In this benchmark, we see that the Pixel 5 by far performs the worst in all tests, which sets Google up to show a significant improvement in performance from one generation to the next if the Tensor SoC is competitive with the rest of the market. Otherwise, Single Core performance across all the devices is roughly within 10% of each other, which makes sense since the Snapdragon 888, Snapdragon 888+ and Google Tensor all use the same ARM Cortex X1 big core. The multicore results are also not surprising, showing that a single X1 with three A78 cores generally does better than two X1 cores with two A76 cores. In our testing, the majority of Snapdragon 888 and 888+ devices scored a solid 20% faster CPU score.

GeekBench ML

This benchmark was the benchmark I was most interested in running because GeekBench ML does test both CPU and GPU, neither of which I was interested in testing. Instead, I ran the NNAPI benchmark which uses TensorFlow Lite as the ML framework and is Google’s default API for machine learning applications. This would also serve as a good test of Google’s claim that the market simply was not producing devices that meet its requirements for AI performance. However, we didn’t really see Google’s claims really stack up, unless you consider Google’s decision to downgrade AI performance on the Pixel 5 when going from the Pixel 4’s Snapdragon 855. The ‘AI Engine’ in the Snapdragon 855 is capable of up to 7 TOPS while the ‘AI Engine’ in the 765G has 5.5 so, it comes as no surprise that Google’s Tensor SoC would look like a huge improvement compared to a downgrade in performance. Additionally, while there is no doubt that Google’s Tensor SoC delivered the fastest NNAPI performance across all the Snapdragon 888 devices, the difference in performance was between 2% and 7% depending on the device. To me, this small of a difference in AI performance indicates that Google’s efforts to build a Tensor SoC with Samsung feels like more of a cost-saving and roadmap certainty decision than a performance one. Additionally, it might not even be a cost-saving measure if Google is spending too much money building the Tensor SoC and doesn’t sell enough devices to amortize that cost across enough chips. Nonetheless, Google’s Tensor is now the AI performance top dog for Android. Also, ASUS needs to do something about its NNAPI performance because both the ROG Phone 5 and Snapdragon Insider Phone are vastly underperforming against the other Snapdragon 888 devices.

3DMark Wildlife

3DMark Wildlife produced some surprising results and some not so surprising results. One of the surprising results was that the Pixel 5 really is performing quite poorly despite running Android 12 just like the Pixel 6 and Pixel 6 Pro and the GPU is simply being outclassed. Almost all the Snapdragon devices performed the same within a few percentage points, but the Pixel 6 Pro and Pixel 6 performed exceptionally well with benchmarks as high as almost 20% higher than the fastest Snapdragon device.  This was somewhat unexpected, so I decided to see if this was ‘bursty’ performance or sustained, which led me to run the 3DMark Wildlife Stress Test.

3DMark Wildlife Stress Test

This test was designed to figure out which devices have great peak GPU performance which devices have great sustained GPU performance. After all, nobody is playing games on their phones for only a minute or two and sustained GPU performance is relevant for applications like augmented reality as well. So, it came as a huge surprise to me to see how much the Google Pixel 6 and Pixel 6 Pro throttled compared to the rest of the devices. As you can see from the graph, the first bar is the initial test run and the second bar is the final test result after 20 loops. Unsurprisingly, the Redmagic 6S Pro had nearly no throttling which means that the little fan in that really does do its job in cooling the phone. If you look at the devices, they have been ordered from lowest to highest final test result, which indicates their ranking based on sustained performance. The difference in performance was so great that I actually had to notate these percentages and graph them.

As you can sort of tell from the graph, the Pixel 6 Pro throttled its GPU performance by over 50% at 58.3% while the Pixel 6 throttled at a more moderate 45%. The other Snapdragon 888 devices throttled anywhere from 24 to 36%. However, the Pixel 5 only throttled by 0.7% and the Redmagic 6S Pro with its active cooling only throttled an equally impressive 1%. To me, this means that Google’s GPU performance, while initially impressive, does have issues with longer term use and isn’t really viable for anything other than limited bursty GPU workloads. This means that gaming performance on the Pixel 6 Pro is worse than most of the flagship phones and the Pixel 6 is roughly on par.

PCMark Android

PCMark for Android is a good test because it tries to emulate a series of day-to-day tasks that a user might do on a device and tests them. As you can see, the Google Pixel 5, 6 and 6 Pro score the lowest across all the other devices. The Pixel 5 is the most obvious underperformer, but the ROG Phone 5 also performs roughly as well as the Pixel 6 devices do. That said, the performance difference between the Pixel 6 devices ranges anywhere between 1% to 37% depending on the device.

Conclusion

In the end, Google’s Tensor SoC inside of the Pixel 6 and Pixel 6 Pro appears to be a very big first step for Google in partnership with Samsung. While it remains to be seen where Google goes with the Tensor SoC in the future and how much more customization the company does, it is quite clear that the company for the most part has a flagship-class SoC that comes close to beating the competition in some aspects and wins in others. If Google’s goal was to go out and build the fastest chip for ML on an Android device, it seems like they may have done it. The performance difference between Qualcomm’s Snapdragon chips does make one wonder if the Tensor project’s goal was really performance oriented or if it was more about cost and roadmap control. If Google doesn’t ship enough Pixels or other devices with the Tensor SoC, I’m not really sure how much of a cost saving exercise it would be to build a semi-custom chip.

Note: Moor Insights & Strategy writers and editors may have contributed to this article. 

Moor Insights & Strategy, like all research and analyst firms, provides or has provided paid research, analysis, advising, or consulting to many high-tech companies in the industry, including 8×8, Advanced Micro Devices, Amazon, Applied Micro, ARM, Aruba Networks, AT&T, AWS, A-10 Strategies, Bitfusion, Blaize, Box, Broadcom, Calix, Cisco Systems, Clear Software, Cloudera, Clumio, Cognitive Systems, CompuCom, Dell, Dell EMC, Dell Technologies, Diablo Technologies, Digital Optics, Dreamchain, Echelon, Ericsson, Extreme Networks, Flex, Foxconn, Frame (now VMware), Fujitsu, Gen Z Consortium, Glue Networks, GlobalFoundries, Google (Nest-Revolve), Google Cloud, HP Inc., Hewlett Packard Enterprise, Honeywell, Huawei Technologies, IBM, Ion VR, Inseego, Infosys, Intel, Interdigital, Jabil Circuit, Konica Minolta, Lattice Semiconductor, Lenovo, Linux Foundation, MapBox, Marvell, Mavenir, Marseille Inc, Mayfair Equity, Meraki (Cisco), Mesophere, Microsoft, Mojo Networks, National Instruments, NetApp, Nightwatch, NOKIA (Alcatel-Lucent), Nortek, Novumind, NVIDIA, Nuvia, ON Semiconductor, ONUG, OpenStack Foundation, Oracle, Poly, Panasas, Peraso, Pexip, Pixelworks, Plume Design, Poly, Portworx, Pure Storage, Qualcomm, Rackspace, Rambus, Rayvolt E-Bikes, Red Hat, Residio, Samsung Electronics, SAP, SAS, Scale Computing, Schneider Electric, Silver Peak, SONY, Springpath, Spirent, Splunk, Sprint, Stratus Technologies, Symantec, Synaptics, Syniverse, Synopsys, Tanium, TE Connectivity, TensTorrent, Tobii Technology, T-Mobile, Twitter, Unity Technologies, UiPath, Verizon Communications, Vidyo, VMware, Wave Computing, Wellsmith, Xilinx, Zebra, Zededa, and Zoho which may be cited in blogs and research.

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Saving the dinosaurs: Startups drive to electrify fossil-fuel cars

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You can save your prized Aston Martin DB6, Porsche 911 or Mustang from the museum of combustion engine history. Or your Fiat 500 and Renault Clio, for that matter.

That’s the message from a growing cohort of European and American startups seeking to carve out roles in the auto transition by converting the roaring dinosaurs of the fossil-fuel age into clean electric vehicles (EVs).

At the high end, companies like Britain’s Lunaz sell a “remanufactured” Aston Martin DB6 for 1 million pounds ($1.3 million), or Dutch firm Voitures Extravert, which sells a reengineered 1960s Porsche 911 for 300,000 euros ($337,000).

At the lower end, startups like France’s Transition-One have developed no-frills kits designed to electrify mass-market models like the Fiat 500 and Renault Clio in a few hours for about 8,000 euros. They are betting they can provide drivers with a cheaper and greener road to zero emissions than scrapping their car and buying a new one.

EV conversion is a cottage industry that’s emerged over the past five years, and been turbo-charged by advances in battery technology and electric motors in the past two. The market is largely untested, and several industry players interviewed by Reuters described an exciting, if precarious, scene.

“It’s pretty revolutionary at the moment,” said Mark Roberts, a 30-year McLaren veteran who is now chief creative officer at British startup Charge Cars. “Almost every month there are new companies popping up and you don’t know who’ll fade away after a year or so or who’ll be there for the duration.”

Next year Charge Cars will launch production of 499 electric versions of 1960s Mustangs, built from the ground up using car bodies produced under license from Ford and starting at 300,000 pounds apiece. The company, which initially set out to convert classic cars, has spent five years developing an electric replica model instead.

“Traditional manufacturers like Porsche can afford to screw up,” says CEO Vadim Shageleev. “We’re a startup, so we can’t.”

Established startups like his have attracted attention from traditional auto suppliers and manufacturers seeking technical input as they transition to electric – Michelin, for instance, has partnered with Charge Cars to test new technologies.

But there may be little room for error as a host of new EV conversion startups strive for scale to help them weather the increasing regulatory standards and costs that have begun to be introduced in countries like France.

“New regulations will wipe out a lot of smaller players because they won’t be in position to meet the standards,” said Chris Hazell, founder of Britain’s Zero EV, another startup working on mass-producing conversion kits for Porsche 964s and other classic models. His company will expand to the United States next year.

CLASSIC TO GARBAGE

There are various proposed routes to scale.

Lunaz, for example, sees classic cars like the Aston Martin DB6 as a good start.

The three-year-old company and its competitors at this end of the EV conversion industry aim to capitalise on the world’s large population of classic vehicles, with an estimated 5 million in the United States alone.

Lunaz typically buys a classic car on the open market or takes a customer’s existing vehicle, strips it down to the bare metal, rebuilds it, gives it a fresh paint job, new interior and an electric drive system and software with a range of about 250 miles.

But Lunaz sees its future in commercial vehicles, and is building a new factory at Silverstone in central England, home to the British Grand Prix, to convert more than 1,000 diesel garbage trucks a year into upgraded electric models.

“Classic cars were the lightning rod to get us to market,” founder David Lorenz said. “But if you want to have a real impact, you’ve got to have scale.”

Lorenz told Reuters the company was scoping out sites for a U.S. plant and one in continental Europe, and was considering going public within a few years.

‘THROW THESE CARS AWAY?’

In France, by comparison, the race is heating up among mass-market converters who spy an opportunity in the country’s anti-road pollution plans, which outpace much of Europe.

All diesels older than 2011 will be banned in large cities from the start of 2025, affecting millions of car owners. Paris wants to go faster and implement the ban from 2024.

New vehicle retrofitting laws introduced in the country last year, which startups say require government testing of about 100,000 euros per generic model to be converted, have intensified the need for scale.

Orleans-based converter Transition-One plans to start selling conversion kits for six models including the popular Fiat 500 and Renault Clio for those diesel owners who cannot afford a new EV. The kits consist of battery, electric motor, power electronics, and new instrument cluster, and typically have a range of about 140 km.

The cost to customers could be close to 5,000 euros including government subsidies, said CEO Aymeric Libeau, who said he aimed to produce kits “at scale” next year, having waited for the retrofitting laws to materialise, with the gear to be installed by independent mechanics certified by Transition-One.

Arnaud Pigounides, CEO of Paris-based REV Mobilities, estimates converting a car to electric cuts emissions 60% versus scrapping an old vehicle and producing a new one, in a country home to around 40 million passenger cars.

Pigounides said his company, which offers to convert a range of cars and commercial vans for around half the price of a new vehicle, has orders to convert 370 cars and 1,500 vans.

“The big question is: do we throw all those cars away or do we convert them?” he added.

‘HOW DO WE DO 10,000?’

Chris Pateman-Jones, CEO of British vehicle charging company Connected Kerb, said only “mass market” options in the EV conversion industry could make a real difference to the environment, rather than classic cars.

“The cost of producing a new car is huge, so if you can reuse what’s there it’s a fantastic idea,” he said. “But the challenge is doing it at sufficient scale to actually have a meaningful impact.”

For four-year-old startup Electrogenic, based down the road from Lunaz, the plan to reach significant size is to tap into rural Britain’s four-wheel drive market, specifically the Land Rover Defenders popular among farmers.

Co-founder Steve Drummond said the company was developing a kit for old Land Rover Defenders for 20,000 pounds that local mechanics can install. He added that Britain’s 36,000 farms need four-wheel drive EVs but there are no equivalent new models on the market.

Across the world in California, meanwhile, Zero Labs is aware of the limits of its current business performing electric “restomods” to rebuild classic Ford Broncos and Land Rovers.

The company’s vehicles start at $350,000, but it can only convert around 50 a year – so it is developing electric platforms that licensed auto shops can use to convert classic cars.

“We asked ourselves how do we do 10,000 a year?” CEO Adam Roe said. “Our platforms are going to be our scale product.”

 

(Reporting By Nick Carey; Additional reporting by Gilles Guillaume in Paris; Editing by Pravin Char)

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Apple tells suppliers demand for iPhone 13 lineup has weakened – Bloomberg News

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Apple Inc has told its component suppliers that demand for the iPhone 13 lineup has slowed, Bloomberg News reported on Wednesday, citing people familiar with the matter, signaling that some consumers have decided against trying to get the hard-to-find item.

 

(Reporting by Maria Ponnezhath in Bengaluru; Editing by Arun Koyyur)

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Apple may have a problem with iPhone demand as well as supply – The Verge

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Apple is indicating to its iPhone 13 component suppliers that it may not order as many units as expected due to a drop in demand, according to a report in Bloomberg.

While the company had already cut orders for the year to 80 million — down from a target of 90 million — it was reportedly planning to make up for much of the drop next year. Now, though, Apple is said to have told manufacturing partners that this may not happen and they might not see the expected boost in orders.

Like almost every other technology company, Apple has been dealing with supply issues brought on by the global semiconductor shortage. CEO Tim Cook said the company’s last quarterly earnings took an estimated $6 billion hit due to the shortage as well as the impact of COVID-19 on manufacturing in Southeast Asia, and Apple was expecting an even bigger impact on this current holiday quarter.

If Bloomberg’s report is accurate, though, it suggests that the iPhone 13 range might not meet Apple’s initial expectations even without the supply crunch. The original plan to assemble 90 million units for 2021 reflected a forecast of increased demand, as Apple usually orders around 75 million iPhones for the year of each launch.

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