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Government of Canada launches applications for the Canada Recovery Benefit

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CRA

Many people continue to feel the impacts of COVID-19 and require temporary income support.  To ensure that Canadians continue to receive the help they need the Government of Canada has introduced three new benefits, delivered by the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA): the Canada Recovery Benefit (CRB), the Canada Recovery Sickness Benefit (CRSB), and the Canada Recovery Caregiving Benefit (CRCB).

Today, the Honourable Diane Lebouthillier, Minister of National Revenue, opened the application process for the CRB.  Applications for the CRSB and the CRCB opened on October 5, 2020.

The CRB provides $500 per week for up to 26 weeks, to workers who have stopped working or had their employment/self-employment income reduced by at least 50% due to COVID-19 and who are not eligible for EI.

The CRA is providing a simple and efficient application process for the CRB similar to the one that millions of Canadians relied on to access Canada Emergency Response Benefit (CERB). Eligible people can apply for these benefits online through the CRA’s My Account portal or by phone through our automated toll-free phone line at 1-800-959-2019 or 1-800-959-2041.

To ensure that the recovery benefits provide more targeted support for those people who continue to need it, the application process for the CRB includes new elements, such as:

  • shorter eligibility periods of two weeks;
  • retroactive periods, meaning that people will be required to apply after the two-week period has ended;
  • a 10% tax withholding at source; meaning that people will receive payments of $900 for each two-week eligibility period;
  •  a three-to-five day window to receive payments for applications made by direct deposit, and a 10-12 day window for cheque by mail.

The Government is committed to having safeguards in place to protect Canadians from fraud and non-compliance. To this end, the CRA is taking steps to implement additional verification and security measures up-front, to help ensure that we deliver benefit payments only to people who are entitled to receive them.

To apply for these benefits, we encourage Canadians to sign up for CRA’s My Account, ensure that personal information with the CRA is up-to-date, and register for direct deposit.  People are encouraged to file a 2019 tax return, if they haven’t done so yet, as this will reduce the likelihood that the CRA would need to request additional information before the application could be processed.

For information about these benefits including eligibility requirements, how to apply, and eligibility period dates, we encourage Canadians to visit the CRA’s webpages.

Quotes

“We know some Canadians are still struggling because of COVID-19. That is why today we launched the Canada Recovery Benefit, which will ensure Canadians who remain unemployed or have a reduced income due to the pandemic, qualify for financial support. The CRA understands how important the delivery of the recovery benefits is to Canadians during this difficult time, and we remain committed to continue doing this essential work. Now more than ever, it is vital that eligible Canadians get the support they are entitled to.”

– The Honourable Diane Lebouthillier, Minister of National Revenue

“Throughout the pandemic, our government has provided people with the support they need to continue to make ends meet while staying safe. While many Canadians have been able to go back to work safely, we know that not all regions have been able to re-open at the same rate and that this continues to have a real impact on workers and their families. These new recovery benefits will provide stability and certainty while also helping to fill gaps in the way Canadian workers qualify for income support. Our Government will continue to support Canadians through this next phase of the recovery. We will get through these challenging times together.”

– Minister of Employment, Workforce Development and Disability Inclusion, Carla Qualtrough

Quick facts

  • The Canada Recovery Sickness Benefit provides $500 per week for up to two weeks, for workers who are sick or must self-isolate for reasons related to COVID-19, or have underlying conditions that would make them more susceptible to COVID-19.
  • The Canada Recovery Caregiving Benefit provides $500 per week for up to 26 weeks per household, for eligible people unable to work because they must care for a child under 12 years old or other family member requiring supervised care, who is unable to attend their school or regular care facility, due to COVID-19.
  • People may earn income of up to $38,000 for the calendar year while receiving the Canada Recovery Benefit.  People will have to reimburse $0.50 of the Canada Recovery Benefit for every dollar of net income earned above $38,000, up to the maximum benefit they received. This will be calculated and repaid as part of their income tax return filing when they do their taxes for the year.
  • To be eligible for any of the recovery benefits, people must have earned at least $5000 (before deductions) in 2019, 2020, or in the 12 months prior to applying.
  • To be eligible for the Canada Recovery Benefit, individuals must be available and looking for work, and must accept work when it is reasonable to do so
  • In some cases, we will ask people to provide us with additional information so that we can verify their eligibility before we process their application.  For example, if our records do not show that an applicant has earned the minimum amount of $5000 as required to be eligible, we may ask the applicant to provide documentation to support their claim. As with the Canada Emergency Response Benefit, people who have received benefit payments but are later found to be ineligible will be required to repay the amounts.
  • People cannot apply for or receive, for the same period, more than one Recovery Benefit, Employment Insurance benefits, workers’ compensation benefits, or Québec Parental Insurance Plan benefits.
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Coronavirus: What's happening in Canada and around the world Tuesday – CBC.ca

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The latest:

People in British Columbia and Alberta’s two largest cities are facing tighter restrictions around some social gatherings after an uptick in COVID-19 cases.

Alberta’s Chief Medical Officer of Health Dr. Deena Hinshaw said Monday that while she has often spoken about the need to “balance between minimizing the risk of COVID-19 and minimizing the risk of harms of restrictions,” the province is now “losing the balance we have been seeking.”

The temporary measure, which caps attendance at 15 for events where people will be “mixing and mingling” like parties and baby showers, applies in the Calgary and Edmonton areas.

Alberta has reported a total of 25,733 cases since the pandemic began, with 4,477 of those listed as active cases. As of Sunday, health officials reported 118 people were being treated in Alberta hospitals, with 16 of those patients in ICU beds. 

Dr. Bonnie Henry, provincial health officer in British Columbia, also placed restrictions on gatherings on Monday, with a focus on events in people’s homes. Henry said gatherings are now limited to people in an immediate household, plus their so-called “safe six” guests.

WATCH | Dr. Bonnie Henry said mask-wearing is expected in public in B.C.:

B.C.’s provincial health officer says British Columbians must wear non-medical masks in public, but stopped short of making them mandatory. 2:13

“This is a bit of a sobering weekend for us,” she said after provincial health officials reported 817 new cases since Friday.

B.C. has reported a total of 13,371 COVID-19 cases since the pandemic began, with 2,325 of the cases considered active. The most recent information from health officials said 77 people were in hospital with 26 in intensive care.


What’s happening across Canada

As of 7 a.m. ET on Tuesday, Canada had 220,213 confirmed or presumptive coronavirus cases. Provinces and territories listed 184,303 of those as recovered or resolved. A CBC News tally of deaths based on provincial reports, regional health information and CBC’s reporting stood at 9,973.

Manitoba’s provincial public health officer also urged people to avoid gathering in large groups, saying many of the 100 new cases reported in the province on Monday linked back to social gatherings — including Thanksgiving.

Dr. Brent Roussin said if the province’s trajectory continues, health officials expect to have a total of more than 5,000 cases by the end of the week. The province had 4,349 cases as of Monday, with 2,117 considered active. There were 80 people in hospital, with 15 in intensive care.

WATCH | Manitoba frustrated by rise in COVID-19 cases:

As Manitoba sees a continued increase in COVID-19 cases, it’s seeing an unprecedented surge in its hospitals and ICUs. As pressure to close parts of the province mounts — officials are pointing fingers and doctors are bracing for the worst. 1:55

Roussin wasn’t the only Manitoba official with words of warning. Premier Brian Pallister expressed frustration on Monday at people with too many close contacts as cases increase.

“Grow up and stop going out there and giving people COVID,” the premier said. 

Saskatchewan reported 54 new COVID-19 cases on Monday, bringing the total number of reported cases in the province to 2,783, with 650 of those considered active cases.

In Ontario, a region west of Toronto is waiting for word on whether tougher measures will be imposed by the province as part of the effort to fight COVID-19. Dr. David Williams, the province’s chief medical officer, said while neither he nor Halton Region’s local medical officer are ready to make a decision on tighter measures for the area, they will be watching case counts and other metrics closely in the coming days.

Quebec Premier François Legault moved Monday to extend restrictions on people living in so-called red zones until Nov. 23, saying daily COVID-19 case numbers and deaths are still too high to allow an easing of limits in places like Montreal and Quebec City.

WATCH | How health authorities are trying to balance restrictions and COVID-19 caseloads:

Infectious disease physician Dr. Zain Chagla discusses how health officials try to balance restrictions and COVID-19 case loads when the data doesn’t show up for weeks after a decision is made. 1:35

In Atlantic Canada, New Brunswick reported three new cases on Monday, bringing the total number of active cases in the province to 60. Health officials in both Nova Scotia and Newfoundland reported one new case, while there were no new cases reported in Prince Edward Island.

There were two new cases reported in Yukon on Monday, and a mine in Nunavut reported that two workers who had been reported as presumptive cases were confirmed as positive for COVID-19. The workers were flown to their home province of Quebec and instructed to self-isolate.


What’s happening around the world

Several potential COVID-19 vaccines are seeing early results from Phase 3 trials, with AstraZeneca saying its has shown results in older and younger participants. Meanwhile, Moderna is so positive about its results it has applied to make its vaccine available earlier. 2:07

A case count maintained by Johns Hopkins University put the number of COVID-19 cases around the world at over 43.5 million as of Tuesday morning with over 29.2 million cases considered recovered. The Baltimore, Md.-based institution’s count of deaths stood at more than 1.1 million. 

In the Americas, the number of hospitalized COVID-19 patients in the United States is at a two-month high, straining health-care systems in some states.

The White House said on Tuesday it saw a potential deal on COVID-19 stimulus funding in “coming weeks,” casting doubt on whether a deal could be struck with Congress before the Nov. 3 election. A spokesperson for Democratic House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said Monday that she was hopeful an agreement could be reached ahead of the election, but noted that there were still major issues that needed to be addressed.

Amid the COVID-19 pandemic, people vote in the U.S. presidential election in the Jurassic Parking structure at Universal Studios Hollywood in Universal City, Calif., on Monday. (Mario Anzuoni/Reuters)

In the Asia-Pacific region, China reported the highest number of asymptomatic infections in nearly seven months. China detected 137 new asymptomatic coronavirus cases on Sunday in Kashgar in the northwestern region of Xinjiang after one person was found to have the virus the previous day — the first local new cases in 10 days in mainland China.

Hong Kong announced it would reopen public beaches and increase the number of people allowed to sit together in bars and restaurants starting Friday as the city continues to unwind strict COVID-19 rules put in place in July.

In India, authorities reported 36,470 newly confirmed coronavirus infections. That’s the lowest one-day tally in more than three months in a continuing downward trend. In its report Tuesday, the country’s health ministry also listed 488 new fatalities from COVID-19 in the previous 24 hours, raising the overall death toll to 119,502.

The case number reported Tuesday is the lowest since India had 35,065 newly confirmed infections on July 17. Last month, the country hit a peak of nearly 100,000 cases in a single day, but daily infections have been decreasing since then.

In Europe, many governments prepared on Tuesday to introduce new restrictions to try to curb a growing surge of coronavirus infections across the continent and provide economic balm to help businesses survive the pandemic. 

Italian police officers stand in front of a shattered Gucci store window during a protest of far-right activists against measures to curb the spread of COVID-19, in downtown Turin on Monday. (Marco Bertorello/AFP/Getty Images)

Hundreds of protesters took to the streets across Italy on Monday to vent their anger at the latest round of restrictions, including early closing for bars and restaurants, with demonstrations in some cities turning violent.

In neighbouring France, Interior Minister Gerald Darmanin warned the country to prepare for “difficult decisions” after some of the strictest restrictions currently in place anywhere in Europe have failed to halt the spread of the disease.

South Africa remained the hardest hit country in Africa, with more than 716,000 recorded COVID-19 cases and more than 19,000 deaths according to the Africa CDC.

People in Iran, the hardest-hit country in the Middle East, faced new daily records of infections and deaths. Authorities have ordered residents in Tehran to wear masks in public, and many public sector workers in the capital have been told to stay home every second day.

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Canada adds 2,531 new coronavirus cases, but new data shows record weekend surge

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Canada reported another 2,531 new confirmed cases of the novel coronavirus Monday, but new data from over the weekend reveals the country posted a far higher number a day earlier — shattering the daily record.

Backdated cases reported Monday by Alberta and British Columbia, who take weekends off from announcing testing data, show Sunday’s true total of new cases nationwide was 3,004.

It’s the first time over 3,000 cases have been reported in a single day across the country.

Saturday’s true daily total was nearly as high, at 2,932 new confirmed infections.

To date, Canada has reported 219,982 cases of COVID-19, although 184,306 of those patients have recovered from the disease.

Over 11.2 million tests have been performed to date. The weekend testing data shows an average three per cent positivity rate each day among new tests performed.

The national death toll has risen to 9,973, after 27 new deaths were reported Monday. Some of those deaths are historical, including in Quebec, while the deaths reported by Alberta and B.C. date occurred between Friday and Monday.

Alberta and British Columbia both set new records over the weekend, their data revealed on Monday. While Alberta surpassed 500 daily cases for the first time on Sunday, the previous day saw B.C. break a new threshold of over 300 cases.

Alberta reported another 504 new cases for Monday alone, bringing the province’s total to 25,733. Its death toll climbed to 307 after seven deaths over the weekend, while 20,949 patients have recovered.

“Alberta, we have a challenge,” chief medical officer of health Dr. Deena Hinshaw said while announcing the new numbers.

“We have now crossed a tipping point and are losing the balance we have been seeking,” she added.

British Columbia’s public health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry called her own province’s weekend numbers “sobering.” She also announced new limits on social gatherings, including inside private homes.

“We have seen a notable increase in transmission of COVID-19 as a direct result of social gatherings in private homes,” she said.

“To get through our COVID-19 storm it requires all of us to do our part.”

There were 207 new cases confirmed in B.C. Monday, for a new total of 13,140 lab-confirmed cases. An additional 231 “epidemiologically linked” cases have not been confirmed through testing, but are part of the province’s grand total.

Three new deaths were reported over the weekend, taking the death toll to 259, and 10,734 recoveries have been confirmed to date.

Heading east, Saskatchewan reported 54 new cases and no new deaths. The province has seen 2,783 cases with 2,108 recoveries to date, while the death toll remains at 25.

Manitoba saw another 100 new cases, while an additional death was reported for a total of 55. There have now been 4,349 cases so far, yet 2,177 of those patients have recovered.

Ontario announced another 851 new cases — Monday’s highest provincial total — and six more deaths, bringing the province’s count to 71,224 cases and 3,099 deaths. A total of 60,839 people have recovered from the virus.

In Quebec, 808 new cases were reported along with 10 new deaths, although only two of them occurred over the past 24 hours. The province has seen 100,922 cases, 6,153 deaths and 85,822 recoveries to date.

Nearly every Atlantic province reported at least one new case on Monday, with no new deaths in the region. Prince Edward Island, which has seen 64 cases to date with only one active case remaining, has not reported data since Friday.

New Brunswick announced three new cases for a total of 331 to date. Six people have died to date in the province, while 265 have recovered

Nova Scotia saw one new case, bringing its total to 1,101 infections. Out of those, 65 have died and 1,031 others are considered recovered.

One new case was also reported in Newfoundland and Labrador, which has now seen 291 cases and four deaths to date, with 282 recoveries.

In the territories, the Yukon added two new cases to its total, which now sits at 22. Fifteen of those cases have recovered, while no deaths have been reported to date.

The Northwest Territories has seen nine cases to date, yet all but one of them have recovered. No cases were announced Monday.

Nunavut remains free of local coronavirus cases, although several infections have been confirmed among out-of-territory workers at a pair of local mines. Officials say those are not considered local cases and have been counted by their home jurisdictions.

The new surge in coronavirus cases across the country comes as the federal government comes under scrutiny for its spending amid the pandemic.

Opposition MPs on Monday voted for a motion approving a parliamentary probe of government contracts for supplies, remedies and vaccine candidates. The Liberal government argued revealing the sensitive contracts could jeopardize future deals.

Worldwide, the novel coronavirus has infected at least 43.4 million people and killed more than 1,157,000, according to data compiled by Johns Hopkins University.

The United States continues to lead the world in both confirmed cases, at nearly 8.7 million, and deaths, at over 225,000.

India is close behind in cases with 7.9 million, followed by Brazil at nearly 5.4 million.

 

 

 

 

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39% of Canadians have 'serious problem' with how police interact with people of colour: poll – CBC.ca

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Nearly two in five Canadians believe there is a serious problem with the way police forces interact with Black, Indigenous and people of colour (BIPOC) communities across the country, according to a new poll.

The Angus Reid survey Defend or Defund?, which polled 5,005 adult Canadians, also found that nearly two-thirds (63 per cent) agree systemic racism is a serious problem, and almost three-quarters (73 per cent) say police in Canada interact inappropriately with Black, Indigenous and people of colour at least some of the time.

When Canadians were asked which answer reflects their feelings about how police interact with non-white people on a national level, the results showed:

  • 39 per cent felt there was a serious problem.
  • 34 per cent said it was sometimes a problem.
  • 15 per cent said there was no problem.
  • 12 per cent weren’t sure.

But fewer Canadians see the way police treat non-white people in their province as a serious problem, and the number drops again when asked about their own communities.

When Canadians were asked the same question about community policing, the results showed:

  • 27 per cent felt there was a serious problem.
  • 27 per cent said it was sometimes a problem.
  • 27 per cent said there was no problem.
  • 19 per cent weren’t sure.

The poll found a significant difference in views between urban and rural areas. (Angus Reid Institute)

Urban vs. rural

The survey found there is a clear divide on the issue based on whether someone lives in an urban or rural area. 

Those outside of major cities were half as likely to say there was a serious problem with how police interact with Canadians of colour in their communities: Almost 30 per cent of urban respondents believe there is a serious problem, while only 14 per cent of rural respondents feel that way. Two in five of those polled in rural areas don’t see a problem at all. 

Breaking down the results between major urban centres in Canada, the survey showed a greater proportion of residents in the Greater Toronto Area were concerned about police interaction with non-white people than in western cities.

  • In the GTA, 41 per cent said it’s a serious problem;
  • In Winnipeg, 36 per cent;
  • In Montreal, 35 per cent;
  • In Vancouver, 29 per cent;
  • In Edmonton, 24 per cent;
  • In Calgary, 23 per cent.

Protesters in Toronto on Aug. 29 call for the defunding of police services across the country. (Evan Mitsui/CBC)

Topical issues within policing

The poll also explored viewpoints on several topical policing issues in Canada, including systemic racism, use of force and police funding.

It found that 28 per cent of Canadians agree there is systemic racism within the RCMP, specifically. And 27 per cent of Canadians said that police are too quick to use force to solve a problem.

Amid national and international outcry over violence and death at the hands of the police, there have been calls to defund the police. In the poll, 25 per cent of Canadians agree there is too much funding going to police forces and that it should be reduced. The survey found 38 per cent of Canadians believed funding levels were just right.

The online poll was conducted from Aug. 26 to Sept. 1, 2020, and carries +/- 1.5 percentage points margin of error 19 times out of 20.

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