Connect with us

Art

Grenfell Campus panel to host Coast Salish Art in conversation with Mi’kmaq – SaltWire Network

Published

 on


CORNER BROOK, N.L. —

The Grenfell Campus Art Gallery is hosting a symposium this week consisting of a panel to place Coast Salish and Mi’kmaq artists in conversation.

The three-day conference, taking place Jan. 10-12, is part of the university’s Salish Weave exhibition.

It is free and open to everyone.

The Coast Salish native peoples are Indigenous to the lower mainland of Vancouver and southern tip of Vancouver Island, B.C. They have a distinct formal tradition in art that European settlement obscured through colonization.

Coast Salish artist and scholar Dylan Thomas, Mi’kmaw artists Emily Critch, Jordan Bennett and Meagan Musseau, and Innu artist Melissa Tremblett are participating in the symposium along with Prof. Ingrid Percy, visual arts program, Grenfell Campus, and Matthew Hills, director, Grenfell Campus Art Gallery.

Western Newfoundland, noted Hills, is home to several Mi’kmaq and Innu artists recovering and reclaiming cultural and aesthetic traditions Indigenous to Eastern Canada, including Newfoundland, and Labrador. Several of them are alumnae of Memorial University and Grenfell’s visual arts program in various stages of their artistic career.

Between 2014 and 2017, Memorial University’s art collection received a donation of three box sets of Coast Salish serigraph prints from the Salish Weave Collection of George and Christiane Smyth of Victoria, B.C.

Box Set I, II and III, also in the collection of the National Gallery of Canada, include the work of internationally recognized Coast Salish artists and represent the ongoing work of the Salish Wave Collection to contribute to the revival of Coast Salish art.

In his essay exploring the critical context of the Salish Weave prints, keynote speaker and Coastal Salish artist Dylan Thomas notes “contemporary Indigenous artists working in the realm of traditional art occupy an interesting space in the creative world by trying to simultaneously draw equal inspiration from the future and the past; like a cedar tree growing in the rain forest, parts of their spirit digs deeply into the rich and nutritious soil of their artistic heritage, which allows the rest of their spirit to grow and reach towards the infinite possibilities of the open sky. This blending of deep history with infinite possibility is epitomized by the current state of Coast Salish art.”

For more information about the exhibition, visit the gallery website.

Full symposium schedule

Friday, Jan. 10
(Grenfell Campus, Arts and Science Extension lecture theatre AS2026)
– 5-6:30 p.m.: CBAWA Drummers Welcome Song
– 6:45 p.m.: Opening Remarks by Ingrid and Matthew
– 7-8 p.m.: Keynote by Dylan Thomas

Saturday, Jan. 11
(Grenfell Campus, Arts and Science Extension lecture theatre AS 2026)
– 9:30-10 a.m.: Refreshments
– 10 a.m.: How Land Language Translates into Visual Language
– 10-10:40 a.m.: Meagan Musseau
– 10:50-11:30 a.m.: Marcus Gosse
– 11:40 a.m.-12:20 p.m.: Jordan Bennett
– 12:30 p.m.: Lunch Break
– 2 p.m.: Deep History with Infinite Possibility panel discussion
– 2-3 p.m.: Jordan Bennett, Marcus Gosse, Emily Critch, Meagan Musseau, Dylan Thomas in conversation with Ingrid Mary Percy and Matthew Hills
– 3-4 p.m.: Participating artists will be in gallery for informal conversation (with refreshments available)
– 4-4:15 p.m.: Closing remarks 

Sunday, Jan. 12
(Grenfell Art Gallery, Fine Arts Building)
– 10 a.m.-12 p.m.: Shared Making in the Gallery (led by artist Melissa Tremblett)

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Art

Cycling art tour offers outdoor engagement | The Star – Toronto Star

Published

 on


Cyclists and art lovers across Richmond can participate in a cycling art tour developed by the city.

Part of the #RichmondHasHeart campaign, the tour aims to bring Richmondites together safely while maintaining physical distancing protocols. City staff said the activity was developed during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic to invite community members to engage with and access the arts in meaningful ways—while staying safe. The program is free, self-guided and contactless, and is available to participants on their own or in small groups.

“Public art is important because it creates civic pride, a sense of place, urban beautification, livability, cultural interpretation and sustainability for residents and visitors of Richmond,” says city public art planner Biliana Velkova.

The self-guided tour begins at City Centre Community Centre and takes participants through 12 public art exhibits. It is about 12 kilometres long and takes an hour and a half. Many of the art pieces included in the tour demonstrate the power and resilience of community, connection, togetherness, home and place, according to city staff. The pandemic provides a unique lens through which to view these works.

Velkova says the city often develops similar self-led cultural events, particularly those that engage with the public art collection.

“As our collection grows, we are always programming different ways to experience it,” she says.

Find more information on public art in the city go to www.richmond.ca/culture/publicart/guides.htm

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Art

Cycling art tour offers outdoor engagement | wellandtribune.ca – WellandTribune.ca

Published

 on


Cyclists and art lovers across Richmond can participate in a cycling art tour developed by the city.

Part of the #RichmondHasHeart campaign, the tour aims to bring Richmondites together safely while maintaining physical distancing protocols. City staff said the activity was developed during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic to invite community members to engage with and access the arts in meaningful ways—while staying safe. The program is free, self-guided and contactless, and is available to participants on their own or in small groups.

“Public art is important because it creates civic pride, a sense of place, urban beautification, livability, cultural interpretation and sustainability for residents and visitors of Richmond,” says city public art planner Biliana Velkova.

The self-guided tour begins at City Centre Community Centre and takes participants through 12 public art exhibits. It is about 12 kilometres long and takes an hour and a half. Many of the art pieces included in the tour demonstrate the power and resilience of community, connection, togetherness, home and place, according to city staff. The pandemic provides a unique lens through which to view these works.

Velkova says the city often develops similar self-led cultural events, particularly those that engage with the public art collection.

“As our collection grows, we are always programming different ways to experience it,” she says.

Find more information on public art in the city go to www.richmond.ca/culture/publicart/guides.htm

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Art

Winnipeg Art Gallery's Inuit Art Centre gets a new Inuktut name – Nunatsiaq News

Published

 on


The Winnipeg Art Gallery’s new Inuit Art Centre is going to be lit.

The gallery announced a new Inuktut name for the centre on Wednesday, Oct. 28: Qaumajuq, which translates as “it is bright” or “it is lit,” a nod to the light that flows into the new building.

The name Qaujamuq was suggested and selected by the WAG’s Indigenous Advisory Circle and its Indigenous language advisory committee, which included Inuktut speakers Taqralik Partridge, Krista Ulujuk Zawadski, Johnny Kasudluak and Theresie Tungilik.

To note the traditional territory the buildings sits on, the advisory circle also opted to give the building an Anishinaabemowin name: Biindigin Biwaasaeyaah, meaning “Come on in, the dawn of light is here” or “the dawn of light is coming.”

The WAG says this is first time an Indigenous naming of this kind has occurred at a major art institution in Canada.

“We are excited about the transformation and naming of the WAG and the Inuit art centre, to continue the process of decolonization,” said Heather Igloliorte, an Inuk curator and art historian, who serves as co-chair of the advisory circle.

“We are thrilled to share the names of the spaces in the seven Indigenous languages of Manitoba and Inuit Nunangat. We are so honoured to gift the institution with these new names that point to a new path forward for galleries and museums in this country.”

Qaumajuq is expected to open in February 2021, and will offer free admission to Indigenous peoples.

The new 40,000-square-foot building, designed by Michael Maltzan Architecture with Cibinel Architecture, will connect to the existing gallery on all four levels, providing exhibition, learning and event spaces, a revamped shop, plus a new café on the main level.

The WAG is already home to a substantial amount of the Government of Nunavut’s Fine Art Collection, which is held on long-term loan at the gallery.

The gallery just launched a new exhibit called Inuk Style, featuring Inuit clothing from that collection, spanning different regions and styles over the last century.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Trending