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Guardian Capital Group Donates Canadian Art Collection to the Agnes Etherington Art Centre, Queen’s University, Establishes Guardian Capital Indigenous Art Fund and Indigenous Student Awards – Yahoo Finance

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TORONTO, Dec. 01, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Guardian Capital Group Limited (Guardian) (TSX:GCG) (TSX:GCG.A) announced today that it has donated its collection of Indigenous art to the Agnes Etherington Art Centre at Queen’s University, and is establishing the Guardian Capital Indigenous Art Fund to support ongoing engagement with the collection. In addition, Guardian is launching the Guardian Capital Indigenous Student Awards, educational grants awarded annually to Indigenous students at Canadian universities and colleges to help support their post-secondary education.

“We feel extremely fortunate to contribute our unique collection of art to an institution that will use it to both celebrate and educate,” said Guardian President and CEO George Mavroudis. “We feel it can make a larger and lasting impact on the heritage of our community by being transferred to the Agnes than it would if it remained within Guardian’s walls.”

Beginning in the 1970s, Guardian’s leadership built an extraordinary art collection, including paintings, sculptures, drawings, prints and textiles by Inuit and First Nations artists. Among the most renowned is Anishinaabe artist Norval Morrisseau, the founder of the Woodland School of art and considered by many to be a grandfather of contemporary Indigenous art in Canada. Among the important pieces is his “Sacred Medicine Bear,” iconic and much reproduced in print.

For the last several years, Guardian has been making plans to donate the company’s complete collection of 64 pieces. With experts on Indigenous art on its faculty and staff and with intentions to use the collection for research and teaching, including conservation studies, the Agnes at Queen’s was a natural choice as its new home. It will be housed there as the “Guardian Capital Indigenous Art Collection.”

“We’re honoured to receive this special collection, which provides opportunity both to celebrate Indigenous art and to underline its past, present and future importance within the artistic and cultural fabric of this country,” said Emelie Chhangur, Director and Curator of the Agnes Etherington Art Centre. “We are extremely grateful to Guardian for this donation, as well as the additional support they are providing through their forward-thinking Indigenous Art Fund.”

“We feel very fortunate to be able to share this incredible collection with our Queen’s community — students, faculty, staff, alumni and beyond,” said Karen Bertrand, Queen’s Vice-Principal (Advancement). “This art will inspire artists and scholars, and will bring all of us together to enjoy and explore both the past and future of Indigenous art in all its forms. It is such a privilege to bring this to a wider audience through the Agnes.”

The Guardian Capital Indigenous Art Fund will be used to support the collection through various means, including cataloguing and updating, presenting an inaugural exhibition and related discursive programming, and developing both printed and digital interpretative materials. This donation represents a significant gift to the institution and contributes to the longevity of these important artworks as well as Agnes’s own commitment to contributing to the history of contemporary Indigenous Art.

While it is Guardian’s hope that these donations will serve as an important contribution to Agnes, Queen’s and the surrounding communities, it is the Guardian Capital Indigenous Student Awards that have the potential to directly impact the next generation of Indigenous scholars and artists at universities and colleges across Canada. The awards will provide annual financial support to Indigenous students to pursue post-secondary education. The first submissions will be accepted in winter 2021, with the inaugural awards to be made in time for the fall 2021 semester.

“We are extremely proud to play a small role in helping students achieve their post-secondary dreams, when they might not otherwise have had the chance,” Mr. Mavroudis said. “These three initiatives are meant as a tribute to Guardian’s early leaders, who believed wholeheartedly in community and the importance of giving back. We hope they will have a positive impact for years to come.” Among those early leaders was Hunter Thompson, who assembled the Indigenous Art Collection on Guardian’s behalf during his years as a Guardian senior executive. In conjunction with Guardian’s donation, Hunter and Valerie Greenfield Thompson are generously donating Indigenous works of art from their own collection to the Agnes.

For further information, please contact:
Angela Shim
(416) 947-8009

Vern Christensen
(416) 947-4093

About Guardian Capital Group Limited

Guardian Capital Group Limited is a diversified financial services company founded in 1962. Guardian operates in two main business areas, Asset Management and Financial Advisory. As at September 30, 2020, Guardian had C$32.7 billion of assets under management and C$20.8 billion of assets under administration. Guardian offers institutional and private wealth investment management services; financial services to international investors; services to financial advisors in its national mutual fund dealer, securities dealer, and insurance distribution network; and maintains and manages a proprietary investment portfolio, which had a fair market value of C$552 million at September 30, 2020. Its Common and Class A shares are listed on the Toronto Stock Exchange; in 2019, Guardian celebrated 50 years as a listed company. To learn more about Guardian, visit www.guardiancapital.com.

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Upcoming contemporary art exhibit featuring a collection of overlapping drawings as 'illegible, messy scribbles' – Kelowna News – Castanet.net

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A Kelowna-based artist is showcasing a new type of art exhibit, focusing on a collection of overlapping drawings that are illegible, messy scribbles for contemporary art.

The Iranian-Canadian artist, Aileen Bahmanipour, has created what she expresses as ‘useless drawings that contradict the very purpose of drawing, which is to have something the viewer is able to see.’

Described as both ‘an image-maker and image-breaker,’ Bahmanipour, exhibit if one that took inspiration from milling machines, extraction tools, and other similar industrial machines that separate particles from materials.

The Wasting Techniques exhibit hosts a series of complex drawings are on clear acetate sheets and will also be sprayed regularly with a spitting machine, which will overtime wash away the drawings and turn them into stains on the floor.

The exhibit also includes multiple ways for visitors to interact with the exhibition, either in person or over a live stream. Two cameras have been set up by the artist, one in front of the transparent sheet and one behind.

“We are intrigued to see the evolution of this exhibition over the next 6 weeks as the artworks change and transform from the spitting machine. Bahmanipour has created an exhibition that avoids being static by not only the transformative quality of the work, but the multiple access points for visitors to experience it,” Artistic and Administrative Director, Lorna McParland said in a press release.

Wasting Techniques will be on view in the Main Gallery of the Alternator Centre for Contemporary Art from Jan. 29 to March 13, 2021.

Visitors will also have an opportunity to learn more about Bahmanipour with an upcoming artist talk with them via zoom on Feb. 18. To learn more and register to participate, visit the Alternator Centre’s website.

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Weekend Round-Up: Stylish Set-Dressing, Madden Strategy, And Parisian Art – HODINKEE

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Peter Schjeldahl has been the head art critic at The New Yorker since 1998. I would be lying to you if I said I was a frequent reader of his work, but I’ve always made it a point to bookmark his criticism when I stumble across it. That doesn’t mean I always return to it, mind you, but his writing generally ends up saved inside a perpetually growing list of need-to-read tabs on my laptop, waiting for me to grow restless enough to come back to it. This week, I opened up one of his more recently published pieces, The Art Of Dying, from December 2019. In this thoughtful piece of self-reflection, Schjeldahl discusses a recent lung cancer diagnosis, his years of sobriety, and how he’s lived his life thus far. Nothing is normal these days, and Schjeldahl’s writing here reminds us that we’re all nothing but a sum of our personal experiences and that how we tell our story truly matters. I highly recommend it.

– Logan Baker, Editor, HODINKEE Shop

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Italian art gallery becomes a COVID-19 vaccine centre – The Globe and Mail

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Carolyn Christov-Bakargiev is director of the Castello di Rivoli Museum of Contemporary Art​, which is turning into a vaccination centre in March, 2021.

handout/Handout

The Castello di Rivoli, near Turin, has been a marvel of reinvention over its thousand-year history. It has been a castle – castello in Italian – royal palace, military barracks, refugee centre and, lately, a UNESCO World Heritage site and art gallery.

In March or April, it will assume another role, COVID-19 vaccination centre, when the Castello di Rivoli Museum of Contemporary Art, the site’s main tenant, opens its galleries to visitors who fancy combining a bit of culture with their inoculations.

The idea of turning one of Europe’s best-known contemporary art museums into a temporary health clinic was conceived by Carolyn Christov-Bakargiev, 63, the museum’s American-Italian director. “Art has always helped and healed,” she said. “It provides an experience that includes and involves others and can be a form of therapy to treat trauma.”

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While vaccinations are normally not considered traumatic experiences, getting one in an airy gallery might take the edge off any lingering jab anxiety. Polls suggest there is vaccine hesitancy among significant minorities of Europeans.

Coronavirus vaccinations will be administered in the third floor gallery of Castello di Rivoli, near Turin, Italy, which has been reinvented over the centuries as a castle, royal palace, military barracks, and a refugee centre.

handout/Handout

The vaccines will be administered in the third-floor gallery of the museum, where the walls are lined with the creations of Claudia Comte, a Swiss artist whose work, according to museum literature, comprises “large scale environmental installations … of a form of consciousness primarily shaped through the digital experience.”

While Ms. Comte’s art may not be to everyone’s taste, the gallery no doubt beats a sterile, windowless hospital room as a vaccination centre. Ms. Comte is also working on what Ms. Christov-Bakargiev called a “soothing, calming” soundtrack that will be played while medics administer the vaccines.

After they get their jabs, the newly inoculated will be allowed to wander the lower galleries (assuming Italian pandemic restrictions allow them to open), where one of the new installations will include Sex, by German visual artist Anne Imhof. Works by Pablo Picasso, Andy Warhol and Amadeo Modigliani are also on display.

The vaccinations will be done by the local health authority, which will have to ensure that the proper safety protocols are in place. Ms. Christov-Bakargiev said the museum should be ideal for the inoculation effort, since it is already equipped with thermal scanners and a climate-control system and has ample space for physical distancing, waiting rooms and vaccination booths. The third floor covers 10,000 square feet.

Castello di Rivoli Museum of Contemporary Art​ is joining the drive that has led to administration of more than 1.2 million vaccine doses in Italy by Jan. 19, 2021.

Paolo Pellion/Handout

She said the idea of turning the museum into a vaccination centre came to her months ago but took on new urgency on Dec. 13, when museum chairman Fiorenzo Alfieri died of COVID-19 after a month-long illness. He was 77.

“The day after he died, I thought that I needed to do something more than close the museum during the pandemic and wait,” she said. “We had to do something more.”

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Many museums and art galleries in Europe began as hospitals, including Les Invalides in Paris and the Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofia in Madrid, home of Picasso’s Guernica. Castello di Rivoli is just doing it in reverse order – a museum that is becoming, in effect, a hospital.

According to Bloomberg’s vaccine tracker, Italy, which has seen 83,000 pandemic deaths, had administered more than 1.2 million vaccine does by Jan. 19. Ranked by doses per 100 people, the tally puts it well ahead of the European Union average.

Italian health authorities are planning to open vaccination sites in public spaces across the country, including city squares. Cultura Italiae, a group of cultural leaders, has proposed that other museums and cultural centres copy the Castello di Rivoli vaccination model. After all, “public museums are committed to creating an accessible, pluralistic space to serve our community,” Ms. Christov-Bakargiev said.

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