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Half of Canadian workers will job hunt in 2023 for better pay and perks, according to poll

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Half of Canadian workers plan to look for a new job in 2023, a nearly twofold increase from just a year ago, according to a new poll by recruitment firm Robert Half.

The survey conducted in the fall found 50 per cent of respondents indicated they planned to search for a new job in the next six months.

That number has risen steadily over the last year and a half, from about 21 per cent of employees on the hunt for a new job in June 2021 to 28 per cent a year ago and 31 per cent six months ago.

The latest polling found the workers most likely to make a career move include employees who have been with a company for two to four years, Gen Z and millennials, tech workers and working parents.

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The top reasons for searching for a new job include a higher salary, better benefits and perks, more advancement opportunities and greater flexibility to choose when and where they work.

The survey also found that nearly three in 10 professionals would consider quitting their job to pursue a full-time contracting career.

Prioritizing employee well-being ‘critical’

David King, senior managing director of Robert Half for Canada and South America, said many Canadian workers continue to have confidence in the job market despite news of layoffs and a hiring slowdown.

“Professionals with in-demand skills know they have leverage given the talent shortage, and are open to new opportunities that offer more fulfilling work, a higher salary, and improved perks and benefits,” he said in a statement.

Employers looking to land top talent this year should refine and streamline their hiring processes and showcase their company culture, Robert Half said.

 

 

Canada’s falling jobless rate signals economy still running hot

Canada’s jobless rate fell to 5.1 per cent in November, with the Bank of Canada likely viewing the labour market as still too hot for comfort.

When applying for positions, the top turn-offs for potential candidates include unclear or unreasonable job responsibilities, poor communication with the hiring manager and misalignment with the company culture and values.

“While we don’t know what the future holds as the labour market continues to evolve, prioritizing employee well-being, engagement and recognition will always be critical to attracting and retaining valued talent,” King said.

The independent online survey was conducted from Oct. 17 to Nov. 7 and included more than 1,100 workers from multiple sectors including finance, technology, marketing and human resources, Robert Half said.

 

Mainstreet NS9:48How ISANS helps newcomers prepare to enter the Canadian workforce

A growing program through the Immigrant Services Association of Nova Scotia is giving newcomers the chance to gain skills before entering the Canadian workforce. Host Jeff Douglas spoke with a former participant, Saeed Fallahtafti, about his experience in the program.

The polling industry’s professional body, the Canadian Research Insights Council, says online surveys cannot be assigned a margin of error because they do not randomly sample the population.

The latest jobs data from Statistics Canada, for December 2022, is set to be released Friday.

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Uber brings back ride share for some Canadian cities — but under a new name – Global News

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Uber brings back ride share for some Canadian cities — but under a new name  Global NewsView Full Coverage on Google News

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'Not telling us the truth': NSP customers complain utility isn't transparent about outages – CBC.ca

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‘Not telling us the truth’: NSP customers complain utility isn’t transparent about outages  CBC.caView Full Coverage on Google News

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Tiny wines find home in B.C.’s market, as Canadians consider reducing consumption

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VANCOUVER — Wine lovers have growing options on the shelf to enjoy their favourite beverage as producers in B.C. offer smaller container sizes.

Multiple British Columbia wineries over the last several years have begun offering their product in smaller, single-serve cans and bottles.

Along with making wine more attractive to those looking to toss some in a backpack or sip on the golf course, the petite containers leave wineries with options for a potential shift in mindset as Canadians discuss the health benefits of reducing alcohol consumption.

Vancouver-based wine consultant Kurtis Kolt said he’s watched the segment of the wine industry offering smaller bottles and cans “explode” over the last several years, particularly during the COVID-19 pandemic when people were meeting outdoors in parks and beaches and looking for something more portable to take with them.

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“You’re not taking a hit on quality, you know? In fact, if someone is only going to be having a glass or two, you’re cracking a can and it’s completely fresh, guaranteed,” he said.

It’s also an advantage for people who want to drink less, he said.

“It’s much less of a commitment to crack open a can or a small bottle or a smaller vessel than it is to open a bottle,” he said.

“Then you have to decide how quickly you’re going to go through it or end up dumping some out if you don’t finish it.”

Last month, the Canadian Centre on Substance Use and Addiction released a report funded by Health Canada saying no amount of alcohol is safe and those who consume up to two standard drinks per week face a low health risk.

That’s a significant change from the centre’s 2011 advice that said having 15 drinks per week for men and 10 drinks per week for women was low risk.

Health Canada has said it is reviewing the report.

Charlie Baessler, the managing partner at Corcelettes Estate Winery in the southern Interior, said his winery’s Santé en Cannette sparkling wine in a can was released in 2020 as a reduced alcohol, reduced sugar, low-calorie option.

“We’ve kind of gone above and beyond to attract a bit of a younger, millennial-type market segment with a fun design concept of the can and sparkling, low alcohol — all these things that have been recently a big item on the news,” he said.

Santé en Cannette is a nine per cent wine and reducing the alcohol was a way to reduce its calories, he said. The can also makes it attractive for events like a picnic or golf, is recyclable, and makes it easier for restaurants that might want to offer sparkling wine by the glass without opening an entire bottle.

At the same time, the lower alcohol content makes it an option for people who might want a glass of wine without feeling the same effect that comes from a higher alcohol content, he said.

“So the health is clearly one incentive, but I think more importantly, so was being able to enjoy a locally made product of B.C. from a boutique winery, dare I say, with a mimosa at 11 o’clock and not ruin your day,” he said.

Baessler said the winery has doubled production since the product was first released to about 30,000 cans a year, which they expect to match this year.

He said there’s naturally a market for the product but he doesn’t expect it to compete with the higher-alcohol wine.

“So this isn’t our Holy Grail. This is something that we do for fun and we’ll never compete, or never distract, from what is our core line of riper, higher-alcohol wine,” he said.

Jeff Guignard, executive director of B.C.’s Alliance of Beverage Licensees, which represents bars, pubs and private liquor stores, said the industry has seen a shift in consumers wanting options that are more convenient.

“It’s not a massive change in consumer behaviour but it is a definitely a noticeable one, which is why you see big companies responding to it,” he said.

Guignard said the latest CCSA report is creating an increased awareness and desire to become educated about responsible consumption choices, which is a good thing, but he adds it’s important for people to look at the relative risk of what they’re doing.

“If you’re eating fast food three meals a day, I don’t think having a beer or not is going to be the single most important determinant of your health,” he said.

“But from a consumer perspective, as consumer preferences change, of course beverage manufacturers respond with different packaging or different products, the same way you’ve seen in the last five years, a large number of low-alcohol or no-alcohol beverages being introduced to the market.”

While he won’t predict how much the market share could grow, Guignard said non-alcoholic beverages and low-alcoholic beverages will continue to be a significant piece of the market.

“I don’t know if it’s reached its peak or if it will grow. I just expect it to be part of the market for now on.”

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Feb. 5, 2023.

 

Ashley Joannou, The Canadian Press

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