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Hall of Fame Mets pitcher Tom Seaver passes away at age 75 – Sportsnet.ca

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NEW YORK — Tom Seaver transformed a franchise and captivated a city, setting enduring standards as he whipped his powerful right arm overhead for the Miracle Mets and dirtied his right knee atop major league mounds for two decades.

A consummate pro and pitching icon, he finished fulfilled after a career remembered with awe long after his final strikeout.

“It is the last beautiful flower in the perfect bouquet,” Seaver said on the afternoon he was inducted into baseball’s Hall of Fame.

Seaver, the galvanizing force who steered the New York Mets from National League laughingstock to a stunning World Series title in 1969, has died. He was 75.

The Hall said Wednesday night that Seaver died Monday from complications of Lewy body dementia and COVID-19. Seaver spent his final years in Calistoga, California.

Seaver’s family announced in March 2019 he had been diagnosed with dementia and had retired from public life. He continued working at Seaver Vineyards, founded by the three-time NL Cy Young Award winner and his wife, Nancy, in 2002 on 116 acres at Diamond Mountain in Northern California.

Seaver was diagnosed with Lyme disease in 1991, and it reoccurred in 2012 and led to Bell’s Palsy and memory loss, the Daily News of New York reported in 2013.

“He will always be the heart and soul of the Mets, the standard which all Mets aspire to,” Mike Piazza, a former Mets catcher and Hall of Famer, tweeted when Seaver’s dementia diagnosis was announced.

Said ex-Mets closer and captain John Franco: “As a kid, you always wanted to be Tom Seaver.”

Nicknamed Tom Terrific and The Franchise, the revered Seaver was a five-time 20-game winner and the 1967 NL Rookie of the Year. He went 311-205 with a 2.86 ERA, 3,640 strikeouts and 61 shutouts during an illustrious career that lasted from 1967-86. He became a constant on magazine covers and a media presence, calling post-season games on NBC and ABC even while still an active player.

“He was simply the greatest Mets player of all-time and among the best to ever play the game,” Mets owner Fred Wilpon and son Jeff, the team’s chief operating officer, said in a statement.

Seaver was elected to the Hall of Fame in 1992 when he appeared on 425 of 430 ballots for a then-record 98.84%.

“Tom was a gentleman who represented the best of our national pastime,” Commissioner Rob Manfred said in a statement. “He was synonymous with the New York Mets and their unforgettable 1969 season.”

“After their improbable World Series championship, Tom became a household name to baseball fans — a responsibility he carried out with distinction throughout his life,” he said.

Seaver’s plaque in Cooperstown lauds him as a “power pitcher who helped change the New York Mets from lovable losers into formidable foes.”

He changed not only their place in the standings, but the team’s stature in people’s minds.

“Tom Seaver hated to lose,” said Jerry Grote, his longtime Mets catcher. “In May of 1969, we had a celebration in the locker room when we reached .500 for the first time. Tom said, `We want more than .500, we want a championship.”’

Seaver pitched for the Mets from 1967-77, when he was traded to Cincinnati after a public spat with chairman M. Donald Grant over Seaver’s desire for a new contract. It was a clash that infuriated baseball fans in New York.

“My biggest disappointment? Leaving the Mets the first time and the difficulties I had with the same people that led up to it,” Seaver told The Associated Press ahead of his Hall induction in 1992. “But I look back at it in a positive way now. It gave me the opportunity to work in different areas of the country.”

He threw his only no-hitter for the Reds in June 1978 against St. Louis and was traded back to New York after the 1982 season. But Mets general manager Frank Cashen blundered by leaving Seaver off his list of 26 protected players, and in January 1984 he was claimed by the Chicago White Sox as free agent compensation for losing pitcher Dennis Lamp to Toronto.

While pitching for the White Sox, Seaver got his 300th win at Yankee Stadium and did it in style with a six-hitter in a 4-1 victory. He finished his career with the 1986 Boston Red Sox team that lost to the Mets in the World Series.

“Tom Seaver was one of the best and most inspirational pitchers to play the game,” Reds Chief Executive Officer Bob Castellini said in a statement. “We are grateful that Tom’s Hall of Fame career included time with the Reds. We are proud to count his name among the greats in the Reds Hall of Fame. He will be missed.”

Supremely confident — and not necessarily modest about his extraordinary acumen on the mound — Seaver was a 12-time All-Star who led the major leagues with a 25-7 record in 1969 and a 1.76 ERA in 1971. A classic power pitcher with a drop-and-drive delivery that often dirtied the right knee of his uniform pants, he won Cy Young Awards with New York in 1969, 1973 and 1975. The club retired his No. 41 in 1988, the first Mets player given the honour.

“From a team standpoint, winning the ’69 world championship is something I’ll remember most,” Seaver said in 1992. “From an individual standpoint, my 300th win brought me the most joy.”

Seaver limited his public appearances in recent years. He did not attend the Baseball Writers’ Association of America dinner in 2019, where members of the 1969 Mets were honoured on the 50th anniversary of what still ranks among baseball’s most unexpected championships.

Five months later, as part of a celebration of that team, the Mets announced plans for a statue of Seaver outside Citi Field, and the ballpark’s address was officially changed to 41 Seaver Way in a nod to his uniform number.

Seaver did not attend those ceremonies, either, but daughter Sarah Seaver did and said her parents were honoured.

“This is so very appropriate because he made the New York Mets the team that it is,” said Ron Swoboda, the right fielder whose sprawling catch helped Seaver pitch the Mets to a 10-inning win in Game 4 of the ’69 Series against Baltimore. “He gave them credibility.”

Seaver’s death was announced, in fact, hours after the Mets beat the Orioles in an interleague game.

“Just a class act. Just a gentleman in the way he handled himself, and really the way he handled his whole career,” said Miami manager Don Mattingly, a former New York Yankees captain. “We just left New York, and every time you walk in a door there, it’s like Tom Seaver Hall, with different pictures.”

When the Mets closed their previous home, Shea Stadium, on the final day of the 2008 regular season, Seaver put the finishing touches on the nostalgic ceremonies with a last pitch to Piazza, and the two walked off together waving goodbye to fans.

“He was a star. A shining star,” Mets teammate Ed Kranepool said. “No one can replace Tom Seaver.”

Seaver is survived by Nancy, daughters Sarah and Anne, and grandsons Thomas, William, Henry and Tobin.

George Thomas Seaver was born in Fresno, California, on Nov. 17, 1944, a son of Charles Seaver, a top amateur golfer who won both his matches for the U.S. over Britain at the 1932 Walker Cup.

Tom Seaver was a star at the University of Southern California and was drafted by Atlanta in 1966. He signed with the Braves for $51,500 only for Commissioner William Eckert to void the deal. The Trojans already had played exhibition games that year, and baseball rules at the time prohibited a club from signing a college player whose season had started. Any team willing to match the Braves’ signing bonus could enter a lottery, and Eckert picked the Mets out of a hat that also included Cleveland and Philadelphia.

Among baseball’s worst teams from their expansion season in 1962, the Mets lost more than 100 games in five of their first six seasons and had never won more than 73 in any of their first seven years. With cherished Brooklyn Dodgers star Gil Hodges as their manager, a young corps of pitchers led by Seaver, Jerry Koosman, Gary Gentry and a still-wild Nolan Ryan, and an offence that included Cleon Jones and Tommie Agee, the Mets overtook the Chicago Cubs to win the NL East with a 100-62 record in 1969.

They swept Hank Aaron and the Atlanta Braves in the first NL Championship Series to reach the World Series against heavily favoured Baltimore, which had gone 109-53. Seaver lost the opener 4-1 in a matchup with Mike Cuellar, then pitched a 10-inning six-hitter to win Game 4, and the Mets won the title the following afternoon.

“He is the man of New York City. He put the Mets on the map,” said Franco, who grew up in Brooklyn. “There will never be another pitcher like him.”

Seaver was an All-Star in each of his first seven seasons. Aaron introduced himself to Seaver at the pitcher’s first All-Star Game in 1967.

“Kid, I know who you are, and before your career is over, I guarantee you everyone in this stadium will, too,” Aaron said.

For Seaver, that All-Star appearance made him feel like he belonged.

“I may have been paid before, but that’s when I really became a professional,” he said.

Perhaps Seaver’s most memorable performance on the mound came at Shea Stadium on July 9, 1969, when he retired his first 25 batters against the Chicago Cubs to get within two outs of a perfect game. Pinch-hitter Jimmy Qualls looped a single to left-centre in the ninth inning before Seaver retired Willie Smith on a foulout and Don Kessinger on a flyout.

“I had every hitter doing what I wanted,” Seaver recalled in 1992. “Afterward, my wife was in tears and I remember saying to her: `Hey, I pitched a one-hit shutout with 10 strikeouts. What more could I ask for?”’

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Jays lose third in a row to Yankees – Bluebird Banter

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Blue Jays 7 Yankees 10

Well, game three end up a lot closer than the first two games.

There were lots of Yankees home runs. Lots. Yankees seem to have that swing down to loft the ball to the short porch to left.

Julian Merryweather ‘opened’ and he managed not to give up a home run. But he wasn’t good, 2 hits, 2 walks, 2 earned. I hoped he could go two innings but no such luck.

Chase Anderson followed and threw a very good second inning. Then he gave up 5 home runs in the third, while getting just 2 outs. He gave up three consecutive home runs on three pitches.

It did remind me of a joke from my youth. What goes whoosh, crack, whoosh, crack, whoosh, crack. A pitcher going down to the minors.

Wilmer Font finished out the third inning and got through the fourth without allowing a run. Our pitching MVP of the series.

T.J. Zeuch pitched 3 innings, giving up just 1 run on, you guessed it, another homer. He allowed 3 hits, 3 walks with 3 strikeouts.


On offense, it was the Lourdes Gurriel show, with 4 hits, 2 homers, a double and a single. Danny Jansen had 3 singles.

We had a rally in the ninth, giving us a few moments of fun. . With one out:

Aroldis Chapman came in:

  • Bo Bichette singled home 2. 10-7, bringing the tying run to the plate.
  • Randal Grichuk struck out.
  • Teoscar Hernandez struck out to end the game. Hernandez was 0 for 5 with 4 strikeouts in his first game back. It will take couple of games to get his timing back

Jay of the Day: Lourdes (.124 WPA).

Suckage: Anderson (-.319) and Merryweather (-.140), Grichuk (-.111, 1 for 5) and Teoscar (-.093)

Matt Shoemaker can’t come back quick enough.

Tomorrow is a double-header, in Philadelphia. first game is 4:00 Eastern.


We had 753 comments in the GameThread. 13yearoldbaseballfanatic led us to defeat.

The series had me thinking of this song, the chorus is ‘Burn this cabin down’. I’m thinking we should do that to Yankees Stadium, burn it to the ground.

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Blue Jays lose big again – Bluebird Banter

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Blue Jays 2 Yankees 13

We held them to a couple of touchdowns today. Progress of sorts.

Yankees hit 7 home runs. 4 off of starter Tanner Roark. The first, a solo homer in the first inning, was a Yankees Stadium special, one that would only be a home run with the short porch in the Bronx. But the other ones were crushed.

Roark went 4 innings, allowed 6 hits, 6 earned, 2 walks and 4 strikeouts.

Jacob Waguespack pitched the next 2 innings, giving up 5 hits, 5 earned, 1 walk with 2 home runs.

Hector Perez got into his first MLB game. He pitched 1.2 innings with 3 hits, 2 earned, 3 walks, 1 k with 1 home run.

Anthony Bass got the last out.

Someone named Kyle Higashioka (the Yankees backup catcher) hit 3 home runs.


Offensively, we only had 5 hits. We didn’t get our first hit until the sixth inning, when Jonathan Villar led off with a double. He would score our first run on a wild pitch. Joe Panik homered in the ninth, to get our second run.

Villar, Grichuk, Vlad, Panik and Espinal had our hits.

Can’t blame the defense today.

No Jays of the Day today. Danny Jansen had the high mark at .007 WPA for his 0 for 2 and a walk.

Suckage: Roark (-.246).

It’s possible that the Jays will send out Wags before tomorrow’s game, if they decide they need someone who can give them a few innings.


We had 643 comments in the GameThread. FlipDown Shades led us to crushing defeat.

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Blue Jays: Tanner Roark does not belong on postseason roster – Jays Journal

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If the Toronto Blue Jays earn a postseason berth, it may go without saying that pitcher Tanner Roark does not belong on the postseason roster.

Tanner Roark once again got torched by the opposition last night as the Blue Jays lost their second contest in a row to the New York Yankees. The 33-year old hurler gave up six runs including four gopher balls over four innings of work.

Roark now sports an inflated 6.41 earned run average allowing 28 earned runs on the season and has not pitched past the fifth inning in any of his nine starts. The veteran pitcher has also surrendered an American League-leading 14 home runs in his first season with the Blue Jays.

The right-hander was very outspoken to the media following his previous start when Manager Charlie Montoyo lifted him after just 67 pitches. However, Roark brought much of the same last night and definitely did not adhere to the old “Put up or Shut-up” adage.

Toronto’s magic number for the postseason now sits at eight games and regardless of their last two efforts, they should still earn a berth in the playoffs. The Blue Jays brain trust will then have to decide if Roark is worthy of a roster spot.

The team will hopefully have Matt Shoemaker back before the conclusion of the season so they could employ a rotation of Shoemaker, Hyun Jin Ryu, Taijuan Walker, and Robbie Ray. That would not only leave Roark but Chase Anderson on the outside looking in.

The Jays inked Roark to a two-year pact this past offseason that will see him earn $12 million again next season. Anderson could hit free agency if the Jays decide not to pick up his $9.5 million dollar team option.

Regardless of the contractual obligations, Roark has done nothing to prove he belongs on the postseason roster and will in all likelihood not pitch once the season concludes at the end of September.

Next: Blue Jays: Fisher should never step foot in the outfield again

Talk is cheap, actions speak louder than words, Tanner.

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