Connect with us

Health

Halton opens 18+ appointment booking for bivalent COVID-19 booster doses – Oakville News

Published

 on


Starting today, Tuesday September 20, residents 18 years of age and older can book an appointment for September 27 onward for the bivalent COVID-19 booster dose.

The bivalent booster targets the original COVID-19 virus and the Omicron (BA.1) variant—the first COVID-19 vaccine to target a specific strain of the virus. It is recommended that residents receive the booster 6 months (minimum 3 months) after a previous dose or COVID-19 infection.

“I encourage all residents to get boosted this fall to gain an extra layer of protection against COVID-19,” said Dr. Hamidah Meghani, Halton Region’s Medical Officer of Health. “In addition to staying up to date on all vaccines available, please stay home when you are sick with any illness that can be passed on to others.”

“Residents are also encouraged to wear masks indoors and in crowded settings. Thank you for continuing to take steps to protect each other, especially those most at risk of complications from respiratory viruses.”

Halton Region is also reminding families that all children 5 to 11 years of age are recommended to receive a booster dose (monovalent booster) and children under 5 years of age who received their first dose of COVID-19 vaccine in the summer will soon be due for their second dose, 8 weeks (56 days) after their first dose.

All bivalent COVID-19 booster doses at Halton Region Community Clinics will be offered by appointment only (no walk-ins). Appointments continue to be added and residents are asked to check back regularly.

Residents can also receive first, second and booster doses (bivalent and monovalent) of the COVID-19 vaccine at Provincial GO-VAXX bus stops (appointment only), participating pharmacies and primary care providers. Residents are encouraged to contact their local pharmacy before visiting, to confirm bivalent booster availability.

Important information & instructions

Effective immediately, residents 18 years of age and older can book an appointment for the bivalent booster dose. Appointments for this group are available starting Tuesday, September 27 at Halton Region Community Clinics – there are no walk-ins at this time. People who are currently eligible to receive a bivalent booster are also encouraged to book their appointment.

To support increased demand for COVID-19 vaccines, Halton Region Community Clinics located at 550 Ontario Street South in Milton and South Oakville Centre in Oakville will be operated by Cleveland Clinic Canada on behalf of Halton Region. Appointments are booked directly through Cleveland Clinic Canada’s online booking system.

Halton Region Community Clinics located at 3450 Harvester Road in Burlington, 280 Guelph Street in Georgetown and 240 Wyecroft Road in Oakville continue to be operated by Halton Region. Appointments are booked directly through Halton’s online booking system.

Clinic information and how to book appointments is updated regularly on Halton’s COVID-19 Vaccine Clinics webpage.

Some more important information:

  • Individuals must have completed a primary series (usually two doses) of COVID-19 vaccine before receiving the bivalent booster.
  • The bivalent booster is recommended 6 months (or 168 days) after a previous dose (including boosters) or COVID-19 infection, at a minimum of 3 months (or 84 days).
  • Use the enhanced vaccine certificate to check previous doses. Use Halton’s online Dose Calculator to quickly confirm eligibility for upcoming doses.

COVID-19 vaccines as part of a primary series (e.g., first and second doses) for youth and adults (12+) continue to be available by walk-in or appointment at our Community Clinics; Paediatric COVID-19 vaccines for children aged six months to 11 years are offered by appointment only (no walk-ins) at Halton’s Paediatric clinics.

Residents who require assistance can call 311 to book their appointment. Please only call 311 if you require immediate booking support or do not have internet access. As we expect an increase in volume, please be patient while Halton makes sure those who require support have access to this service.

Residents requiring additional assistancelanguage supports or other accommodations at a community clinic can contact 311 prior to their appointment to arrange for supports.

  • Transportation services to and from appointments are available, free of charge, for those who require it.
  • Parking is free at all clinic locations.

To prepare for your appointment, please remember to:

To learn more about Halton Region’s COVID-19 Vaccine Program, including the bivalent COVID-19 booster and how to book an appointment, please visit halton.ca/COVIDvaccines.

Adblock test (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Health

'Similar strategy' needed for global CVD prevention in men, women: PURE – Healio

Published

 on


September 23, 2022

2 min read

Disclosures:
One author reports receiving speaker and consultant fees from Bayer and Janssen for work unrelated to this study. Walli-Attaei and the other authors report no relevant financial disclosures.

We were unable to process your request. Please try again later. If you continue to have this issue please contact customerservice@slackinc.com.

The magnitude of associations with major CVD for most risk factors are similar in women and men, despite sex differences in risk factor levels, according to an analysis of the PURE study.

In a comprehensive overview of the prevalence of metabolic, behavioral and psychosocial risk factors for CVD in women and men globally, researchers also found that diet was more strongly associated with CVD in women than in men. However, high concentrations of non-HDL and related lipids and symptoms of depression were more strongly associated with risk for CVD in men than in women. Patterns remained consistent across countries regardless of income level.

Community heart_Adobe_120840931

Source: Adobe Stock

“Existing studies, mostly from high-income countries, have reported that hypertension, diabetes, and smoking are more strongly associated with cardiovascular disease in women than in men,” Marjan Walli-Attaei, PhD, a research fellow at the Population Health Research Institute of McMaster University and Hamilton Health Sciences, and colleagues wrote in The Lancet. “Such findings would imply that women would benefit to a greater extent in reducing cardiovascular disease risk from control of these risk factors than would men. However, the burden of cardiovascular disease is greatest in low-income and middle-income countries, for which prospective data on the association of risk factors with cardiovascular disease are sparse, with a paucity of analysis by sex.”

Marjan Walli-Attaei

Walli-Attaei and colleagues analyzed data from 155,724 adults aged 35 to 70 years at baseline without a history of CVD enrolled in the PURE study, which included participants from 21 high-, middle- and low-income countries, and followed them for approximately 10 years (58% women; mean baseline age, 50 years). Researchers recorded information on participants’ metabolic, behavioral and psychosocial risk factors; all participants had at least one follow-up visit. The primary outcome was a composite of major CV events, defined as CV death, MI, stroke and HF. Researchers reported the prevalence of each risk factor in women and men, HRs and population-attributable fractions associated with major CVD.

As of the data cutoff of Sept. 13, 2021, researchers observed 4,280 major CVD events in women (age-standardized incidence rate, 5 events per 1,000 person-years) and 4,911 in men (age-standardized incidence rate, 8.2 per 1,000 person-years).

Compared with men, women presented with a more favorable CV risk profile, especially at younger ages. HRs for metabolic risk factors were similar in women and men, except for non-HDL, for which high non-HDL was associated with an HR for major CVD of 1.11 in women (95% CI, 1.01-1.21) and 1.28 in men (95% CI, 1.19-1.39; P for interaction = .0037), with a consistent pattern for higher risk among men than women with other lipid markers.

Researchers also observed that maintaining a diet with a PURE score of 4 or lower (score range, 0-8) was more strongly associated with major CVD in women than in men, with HRs of 1.17 (95% CI, 1.08-1.26) and 1.07 (95% CI, 0.99-1.15; P for interaction = .0065), respectively.

In contrast, symptoms of depression were more strongly associated with CVD in men than in women, with the HRs for symptoms of depression being higher in men than in women (P for interaction = .0002). “The HRs of other behavioral and psychosocial risk factors, as well as grip strength and household air pollution, were similar among women and men,” the researchers wrote.

The total population-attributable fractions associated with behavioral and psychosocial risk factors were greater in men than in women (15.7% vs. 8.4%) mostly due to the larger contribution of smoking to population-attributable fractions in men (10.7%) vs. women (1.3%).

“Our results emphasize the importance of a similar strategy for the prevention of cardiovascular disease in both sexes,” the researchers wrote. “However, the increased risk of cardiovascular disease in men might be substantially attenuated with better reductions in tobacco use and lipid concentrations.”

Adblock test (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Health

Blood Clot Risk Remains Higher Almost a Year After COVID – The Suburban Newspaper

Published

 on


FRIDAY, Sept. 23, 2022 (HealthDay News) — An increased risk of blood clots persists for close to a year after a COVID-19 infection, a large study shows.

The health records of 48 million unvaccinated adults in the United Kingdom suggest that the pandemic’s first wave in 2020 may have led to an additional 10,500 cases of heart attack, stroke and other blood clot complications such as deep vein thrombosis, in England and Wales alone.

The risk of blood clots continues for at least 49 weeks after infection, the study found.

“We have shown that even people who were not hospitalized faced a higher risk of blood clots in the first wave,” said study co-leader Angela Wood, associate director of the British Heart Foundation Data Science Centre.

“While the risk to individuals remains small, the effect on the public’s health could be substantial and strategies to prevent vascular events will be important as we continue through the pandemic,” Wood said in a news release from Health Data Research UK, which sponsors the center.

Researchers found that the risks did lessen over time.

Patients were 21 times more likely to have a heart attack or stroke in the week after their COVID diagnosis. After four weeks, the risk was 3.9 times greater than usual.

Heart attacks and strokes are mainly caused by blood clots blocking arteries.

The risk of clots in veins was 33 times greater in the week after COVID diagnosis, dropping to eight times greater after four weeks. Conditions caused by these clots include deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, which can be fatal.

By 26 to 49 weeks after a COVID diagnosis, the risk dropped to 1.3 times more likely for clots in arteries and 1.8 times more likely for clots in veins, the study showed.

More from this section

While people who were not hospitalized had a lower risk, it was not zero, the study found.

Overall, individual risk remains low, the authors said. Men over 80 years of age are at highest risk.

“We are reassured that the risk drops quite quickly — particularly for heart attacks and strokes — but the finding that it remains elevated for some time highlights the longer-term effects of COVID-19 that we are only beginning to understand,” said study co-leader Jonathan Sterne, director of the NIHR Bristol Biomedical Research Center and of Health Data Research UK South West.

The authors said steps such as giving high-risk patients blood pressure-lowering medication could help reduce cases of serious clots.

Researchers are now studying newer data to understand how vaccination and the impact of new COVID variants may affect blood clotting risks.

The findings were recently published in the journal Circulation.

More information

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has more on blood clots.

SOURCE: Health Data Research UK, news release, Sept. 20, 2022

Adblock test (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Health

MPs, Senators debate requirements for medically assisted dying with mental disorders

Published

 on

OTTAWA — An expert told a special joint committee of the House of Commons and Senate that people with mental disorders can suffer for decades, and their distress is equally as valid as someone suffering physical pain.

People suffering solely from mental disorders are due to become eligible for assisted dying in March, and Dr. Justine Dembo, a psychiatrist and medical assistance in dying assessor, also cautioned the committee about perpetuating stigma about mental illness.

Mental health advocates warn it is harder to predict the outcomes and treatments of mental illnesses, and a wish to die is often a symptom, but an expert panel earlier this year said existing eligibility criteria and safeguards in medically assisted dying legislation would be adequate.

Both arguments were made today by a handful of witnesses appearing before the committee, which is deliberating what policies to recommend to lawmakers ahead of the March deadline.

Ellen Cohen, a coordinator advocate for the National Mental Health Inclusion Network, told committee members Canada needs laws to help patients, not hurt them.

“I don’t believe there were any safeguards recommended,” she said.

She resigned from the federal government’s expert panel on MAID and mental illness in December 2021. She said there was no space to identify how vulnerable people could be protected.

The panel released its report May 13, concluding that existing eligibility criteria and safeguards would be adequate “so long as those are interpreted appropriately to take into consideration the specificity of mental disorders.”

Dembo, who was one of the expert panel members, said following those guidelines for people with mental disorders “would ensure an extremely comprehensive, thorough and cautious approach.”

She told the committee people with mental disorders can suffer for decades.

“To say someone with mental illness just shouldn’t be eligible, with that big of a blanket statement, where people don’t even get the chance to be assessed as individuals unique in their circumstances, to me is very stigmatizing,” she said.

While the interim report released earlier this year stops short of making recommendations of its own,  it concludes by urging the government to take steps to implement the recommendations of the expert panel “in a timely matter.”

A final report from the committee, complete with recommendations that address other areas including access for mature minors, advance requests, the state of palliative care and the protection of people with disabilities, is due on Oct. 17.

Cohen called the timeline for the legislation to be expanded by March unrealistic.

“I’d like to see this government push this deadline back,” she said.

But Dembo disagreed, telling MPs and senators that assessors are already gaining experience following the existing guidelines.

“Whether or not March 2023 is a realistic deadline depends on how committed and efficient various provincial bodies and local bodies can be in implementing guidelines based on the panel report. I’m hoping they can do that,” she said.

The committee’s review was mandated in the MAID legislation that required that a parliamentary review be initiated five years after the law came into effect in 2016. The committee began its work in 2021 before it was dissolved ahead of the federal election last fall.

The panel and the committee use the terminology “mental disorders,” rather than “mental illness,” stating in their reports that there is no standard definition for the latter and its use could cause confusion.

Conservative MPs on the committee offered a dissenting interim report earlier this year, saying it would be “problematic” to simply endorse the panel’s recommendations.

The MPs argued there are “far too many unanswered questions” on the subject, and nothing precludes the committee from revisiting whether assisted dying should be offered to this category of people at all.

“Legislation of this nature needs to be guided by science, and not ideology,” the Conservatives wrote in May, warning that an outcome that could “facilitate the deaths of Canadians who could have gotten better” would be completely unacceptable.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Sept. 23, 2022

 

The Canadian Press

Continue Reading

Trending