Connect with us

Health

Has India stumbled upon a chance defence against coronavirus? Nomura economist thinks it has – Economic Times

Published

on


Does India have a serendipitous bulwark against the deadly virus that is ravaging parts of China and spreading to several other regions of the world?

As it turns out, some people do think that could be the case. In an interview, Robert Subbaraman, chief economist at Nomura, said Asia is by far the region most exposed to contracting the virus, but within Asia, India is the least exposed to economic fallout from the coronavirus.

The reason: India’s aversion to joining Asia’s sophisticated supply chain for production, where China is the epicentre, may be what is saving the country from coronavirus.

India has been slow to get involved in Asia’s very sophisticated supply chain for production across countries where China is the epicentre. This has helped India from feeling the real damage of the coronavirus, which has brought many industries, in and outside China, to a standstill.

“India does not have a strong links with China in terms of visitor arrivals and so forth in some of these other Asian countries but also the economic spill-overs from China onto India are not severe,” Subbaraman said.

India and the virus

The outbreak of the virus in China has hit India’s manufacturing and exports sectors. Among those hit particularly hard are medicines, electronics, textiles and chemicals. China is India’s biggest source of intermediate goods, a sector that sees bilateral trade worth $30 billion a year.

The Indian government is seized of the threat. Finance minister Nirmala Sitharaman said the government would announce measures soon to help cope with the effect of the virus. The FM met more than 200 business leaders to assess the impact of the coronavirus and discuss plans to contain the damage.

Ratings agency Moody’s said on Tuesday that the outbreak added to pressures on growth in Asia. The impact is felt primarily through trade and tourism, and through supply-chain disruptions.

Moody’s cut its economic growth forecast for India for 2020 to 5.4% from an earlier estimate of 6.6%, and cut the forecast for 2021 to 5.8% from 6.7%, saying the revisions were also affected by weakening domestic demand.

One economy already down

China’s economy now faces much weaker growth as the spread of the virus has hit production as well as trade.

“China’s GDP growth is going to be at least a halving between Q4 and Q1 this current quarter. So it is looking like this quarter will be 3% year-on-year,” he added.

The business impact of the virus is already being felt in many parts. While the world scrambles to control its spread, the world’s most China-reliant economy, Australia, is reeling from shockwaves. The faltering of Australian trade has now fueled questions over whether the nation is too reliant on the Asian behemoth.

Coronavirus has now affected over 82,000 people worldwide, and caused more than 2,800 deaths. About 30,000 of the affected have been cured, but fear of infections is still rampant and is only growing.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Health

Coronavirus: Could you have already had the virus? 5 questions answered – WPXI Pittsburgh

Published

on


The list of symptoms that have been associated with the virus is not a small one. According to the CDC, symptoms such as a dry cough, fatigue, low-grade fever, body aches, nasal congestion and sore throat are the most common with COVID-19. In addition, symptoms such as the loss of the senses of taste and smell, diarrhea and the appearance of conjunctivitis – commonly known as “pink eye” – have also been seen.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Health

Here's what you should know about wearing cloth face masks – CollingwoodToday

Published

on


Medical officials are still stopping short of recommending the general public wear homemade masks, but they are suggesting a cloth mask could help slow the spread of COVID-19.

Dr. Charles Gardner, medical officer of health for Simcoe Muskoka District Health Unit, said today a homemade cloth mask could help someone who doesn’t know they have the virus keep from spreading it to others.

“People should be aware they’re not of proven value,” said Gardner. “If there is any value in them it’s more from the point of view of avoiding infecting others.”

A cloth mask could keep droplets from your nose and mouth from entering someone else’s airway or landing on and contaminating a surface.

“They have not been shown to prevent respiratory viruses from entering your airway,” said Gardner.

But it shouldn’t replace any of the other preventative measures being recommended by public health organizations in the province and country.

“What’s really important is that people do their physical distancing and their handwashing,” said Gardner.

He also recommends people stay home, think twice about whether or not they need to go out, and if they do, to focus on quick trips for essential items while still maintaining a two-metre separation with any other people.

“The more we do, the better we do this, the less that surge will be,” said Gardner. “April is a very key month for us in this outbreak. This month we’re going to see the extent to which the surge occurs. If we were very successful it will be a limited surge. If we were less successful it will be a bigger surge more likely to overwhelm our healthcare system.”

There are now 98 lab-confirmed COVID-19 cases in the region, more than 10 of those at Bradford Valley, a long-term care facility.

Gardner stressed members of the general public should not be wearing medical-grade masks.

“All of those we really need to retain for healthcare workers because of a limited supply,” he said.

Additionally, there are specific fits and protocols that make surgical masks and N95 masks effective PPE. Without following those specifications, a medical-grade mask will not offer effective protection.

If you are experiencing any symptoms of COVID-19 including coughing and sneezing, stay home, indoors, for at least 14 days.

Dr. Theresa Tam, Canada’s chief medical officer of health, said today people can use homemade cloth masks to prevent spreading the virus to others. She said there is increasing evidence people can transmit the virus before knowing they are sick, and keeping their mouth and nose covered while in public – in addition to frequent handwashing and physical distancing – could help reduce spread.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has posted some tips on its website on using cloth face masks to help slow the spread of COVID-19.

The CDC says to use a mask that fits snugly, is secured with ties or ear loops, includes multiple layers of fabric, and can be laundered and machine dried without changing shape.

If you are using a cloth mask, put it on before you go out in public, and then don’t touch it or your face again. Once at home, remove the mask without touching your face, and put it in the laundry. Wash your hands thoroughly and disinfect surfaces you touched on the way in.

The CDC also states a cloth face mask is an additional, voluntary public health measure and should only be used with proper handwashing and physical distancing practices.

You can find sewing and no-sew instructions for cloth face masks on the CDC website.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Health

Homemade face masks can protect others, but not you: health officials – CTV News Winnipeg

Published

on


WINNIPEG —
The increase in demand for personal protective equipment has led to an increase in demand for homemade face masks.

Monday both the Federal and Provincial Government said there’s a benefit to wearing homemade masks when in public.

Dr. Theresa Tam, chief public health officer for Canada, said the Special Advisory Committee for COVID-19 concluded wearing a non-surgical mask can help protect those around you, but it doesn’t protect the person wearing it,

“Wearing a non-medical mask in the community does not mean you can back off of the public health measures that we know work to protect you,” said Tam.

She said we can’t “relax” any of our physical distancing efforts, but added people who want to wear masks as an extra precaution can make them out of household items.

”Simple things, not complicated,” said Tam. “If you can get a cotton material like a t-shirt, you cut up, fold it, (and) put elastic bands around it. Those are the kind of facial coverings we’re talking about.”

Some Manitobans have been pulling out the needle and thread to craft homemade face masks.

Grace Webb, the creator of the Facebook page Face Masks for Manitoba, said she got the idea to sew masks and donate them after reading a U.S. article.

She said the idea snowballed and she started the Facebook group so other mask makers could join her.

“From there it became apparent that people wanted to do this but didn’t have material,” said Webb. “So I thought, why don’t we (build) a kit we can send to people with everything they need to make mask.”

Webb said she’s donating the masks to care homes and people in the community.

Each mask comes with instructions on how to clean them properly, along with a reminder to practice social distancing and wash your hands frequently.

Dr. Brent Roussin, chief public health officer for Manitoba said wearing a non-surgical mask is like coughing into your sleeve.

He said he doesn’t want this information about homemade masks to distract from the most important message.

“If you were staying home before, stay home now,” said Roussin. “Don’t go out now because somebody has said we can use cloth or non medical masks.”

Webb said she’ll continue to sew homemade masks as long as there’s a need.

“I hope it gives them some comfort and a little bit more security,” Said Webb. “I would love to say that we did something to help slow the spread.”

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Trending