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Hayley Juhl: Magic Moon and the children's art of make-believe – Montreal Gazette

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These aren’t necessarily examples of children getting in touch with their naughty selves, Howe explained, but rather a trying on of different personas.

“What does it feel to be a dog? To be a ninja? They step into a role to see how they can make it theirs. They know they’re pretending. It is unlikely to become aggressive.”

“I like to be Harry Potter because I love reading the books and watching the movies,” said Rylee, who is 8. “I like to play Harry Potter with my friends at school. We play different characters.”

That’s common in the schoolyard, Howe said, where children find common ground with their peers.

Later in elementary school, make believe becomes more private, she said. Trevor found a day-camp friend to story-build with, but by late elementary he transitioned to doodling Magic Moon battle scenes and was less likely to jump around shooting things.

“I took a more administrative role,” he said.

Just because they’re growing up doesn’t mean they’re leaving Neverland forever. Just because we’re grownups doesn’t mean we don’t make believe in our own ways.

“A lot of pretend becomes internalized, our own fantasy world,” Howe said. “It becomes a way we can think in a new situation.

“It doesn’t die away. It just changes form.”

hjuhl@postmedia.com

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Departures at high-profile Barcelona museum provoke anger in art world – The Guardian

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Departures at high-profile Barcelona museum provoke anger in art world  The Guardian



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Oak Bay sets aside $27,000 for Indigenous art at muncipal hall – Saanich News

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Oak Bay’s newly renovated chambers will feature a new piece of public art commissioned from an Indigenous artist.

The district allocated one per cent of the budget for the hall renovation, $7,000 to public art. Combined with the annual public art allocation, the district has $27,000 to spend on a work for municipal hall.

The move to work with a local artist, specifically from the Lekwungen speaking people on whose land Oak Bay sits, was unanimous among council members.

“This is a rare opportunity to have the resources to do that and as the renovated municipal hall reopens, have that be one of the centrepieces,” Coun. Andrew Appleton said during council discussions July 12.

Still in the earliest of stages, conversation surrounded the how of the project.

Oak Bay is between arts laureates, but liaison Coun. Hazel Braithwaite said the public arts committee is taking on that leadership role.

READ ALSO: Oak Bay artist leaves land to Victoria Native Friendship Centre

Coun. Tara Ney lamented the district’s lack of policy or set protocol for engaging in such initiatives.

She voiced a need to create pathways for engaging so it’s not done piecemeal, and instead with confidence and in culturally appropriate way.

Mayor Kevin Murdoch, who is routinely in conversation with local First Nations leadership, said the district is doing well in the absence of policy, always seeking guidance and building relationships in small ways.

Council agreed working toward something more formal is something they could pursue.

“This does require more formality and we need to start to establish those connections so we’re consistent and so we’re completely aware and sensitive to their needs,” Coun. Cairine Green said.

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READ ALSO: Greater Victoria residents invited to blessing of Indigenous mural celebrating solidarity

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‘Lynn Valley LOVE’: artist collaborates with public to remember victims of stabbing tragedy – News 1130

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NORTH VANCOUVER (NEWS 1130) — Earlier this year, the tightly knit North Vancouver community was shaken after a stabbing claimed the life of one woman and injured six others.

One local woman says, since the incident, the community has had its security threatened, which is why she is behind the newly unveiled art project “to bring some love and positivity back into that space.”

Modern quilter, Berene Campbell, has worked on projects across the country and world, but her latest artwork “Lynn Valley LOVE Project,” was sparked by the tragedy right outside her home.

“This one was just down the road from my home. So for some reason, it just felt like I had to respond to that since I’ve done it for other communities. And now there was a tragedy in my own community. I felt like I needed to do something.”

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So, Campbell went to work, collaborating with residents in the community and people across the country.

Today, if you walk into the Lynn Valley Library, you’ll be greeted with quilted panels spelling ‘LOVE’ “hung there to represent the general community to bring love back into that space.”

Banners made by hundreds are hung over the library stairwell.

“People do it to give back to the community to make them feel good [and] it’s also very healing for the participants to be creative and to make something beautiful and also to be a part of the bigger whole project and to feel a part of the community. So when you see that many people participating, it’s amazing.”

And Campbell says the turnout of participates was unexpected but incredible adding, she couldn’t have done it on her own.

“There’s something incredibly powerful about bringing multiple people together, and the healing of collective energy is much more powerful than one person making all of that work themselves on their own.

“There’s something just amazing about people working together for the greater good.”

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