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Heffel art auction shifts to a 'digital sale room' – Vancouver Sun

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Former Vancouver Art Gallery curator Ian Thom wrote the catalogue entry for the painting, and said meeting Stern was “a turning point in Hughes’s life, because Stern agreed to take on Hughes’s work at his gallery.

“More importantly for the financially struggling artist, Stern agreed to buy the paintings outright, thus assuring Hughes of an income.”

The painting itself is a classic Hughes coastal scene — a Canadian Pacific steamship billowing dark smoke out its funnels as it pulls into the dock, with smaller boats, a lighthouse and islands looming in the background.

The dark blue of the water is reminiscent of the water in Fish Boat, Rivers Inlet, a 1946 Hughes painting that sold for a record $2.04 million in 2018. Three Tugboats, Nanaimo Harbour is no less charming, but has lighter colours, more in keeping with his popular coastal scenes in the 1950s and ‘60s.

The 1952 E.J. Hughes painting Three Tugboats, Nanaimo Harbour has a presale estimate of $200,000 to $300,000. Photo by Ward Bastian /PNG

Heffel is also very high on Green and Gold, Portrait of Vera, a striking 1933-34 Frederick Horsman Varley painting of his most well-known muse, artist Vera Weatherbie. It’s estimated at $500,000 to $700,000.

The fall sale is the 25th anniversary of the first Heffel auction.

“Our first live sale was at the Wall Centre in November, 1995,” Heffel recalls. “We had a fabulous Alex Colville, Dog and Groom, on the cover (of the catalogue). In fact we often say that was the sale we had the most fun at, because we were just rookies out of the box.”

The Heffel brothers had taken over the Heffel gallery at 2247 Granville after its founder, their father Ken, died of a heart attack on Oct. 13, 1987. He was only 53.

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Indigenous art set to soar on Gordie Howe International Bridge project – CBC.ca

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Indigenous artists and a project co-ordinator who created massive artworks set to adorn the Canadian-side tower of the Gordie Howe International Bridge say they hope their work represents more than just artistic beauty. 

Several enormous paintings created by three artists — Teresa Altiman and Daisy White of Walpole Island First Nation, and Naomi Peters of Caldwell First Nation — will rise into the air up to 220 metres as the tower on this side of the border is constructed. The bridge company approached Paul White of Walpole Island First Nation to coordinate the effort. 

White said his hope is that when people see these works, they’ll ask themselves the tough questions that may lead to education and healing.

“And through those answers they gain an understanding of the artists as Native people, and Native people in general, and the messages Native people are trying to convey through their art,” said White. 

“[It’s] A way of really increasing the understanding between all the peoples of Canada and the United States too, and it’s just there is no better way to display it or describe it.”

Caldwell First Nation artist Naomi Peters works away on her piece for the Gordie Howe International Bridge project. (Submitted by Naomi Peters)

The artworks have now been installed, and the rise will be slow as construction on the tower begins. Once construction is over, the artworks will be repurposed in some way, say bridge company officials. 

For her part, Peters painted a picture of a hoop dancer that is five metres by seven metres.

“I dedicated over a week to it, and I was working day to night,” she told CBC’s Afternoon Drive host Chris dela Torre. 

“I’ve done a lot of larger canvas work. When I was young, my dad used to paint walls, and he taught me how to do it properly, so I had a little bit of a handle on it, but it really was a new experience, especially seeing those large panels. Holding them up, like you needed two people to even move them around.” 

Peters said this is the largest artwork she’s ever created before, and was overwhelmed at first. (Submitted by Naomi Peters)

As with each of the artworks and the intricate details they include, Peters’ hoop dancer has great meaning behind it. 

“I knew I wanted to do something that represented a lot of different tribes … Originally I was going to do something from my Pottawatomie heritage, like the grass dance or something, but I realized that would be a bit non-inclusive for other tribes,” she said. 

“So the hoop dance is something that a lot of tribes can participate in and people who are even non-Indigenous are allowed to participate in without any kind of decorum … I just wanted to show you something that everyone could enjoy.”

LISTEN | Hear more from Peters about how she created her work and what it means to her:

Afternoon Drive7:04Indigenous artists featured on Gordie Howe International Bridge project

A massive art project is set to be revealed as part of the Gordie Howe International Bridge project. Afternoon Drive host Chris dela Torre speaks with Caldwell First Nation artist Naomi Peters about the undertaking. 7:04

The painting process took place at an arena near Walpole Island First Nation, and White’s construction team helped the three female artists with the big undertaking. 

Workers traced sketches as outlines and even helped with some of the painting, which Altiman, who is 72-years-old, said she greatly appreciated. 

Altiman’s painting of a bear and three cubs  — white, red, black and yellow — are sacred colours to the Ojibway people, she said.

“For me, I was hoping that our art that we had on the bridge would be a teaching tool, that we are teaching people a little bit about who we are as a First Nation people, as Indigenous people,” she said. 

“And so the four colours are telling you something. They’re telling you that these are all the colours of the people of the world.”

Walpole Island First Nation artist Teresa Altiman created the works of a bear and three cubs. Daisy White, 17, also of Walpole Island First Nation, created the centre artwork seen here. (Darrin Di Carlo/CBC)

Altiman also emphasizes how important it was that her fellow contributors are young women. 

“I think it is really phenomenal that this is happening for them as young artists, and certainly for myself as an older artist. I mean, I am honoured that this is happening and that my work is going to be shown in such a prominent location.”

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Art is good medicine in these trying times – ThePeterboroughExaminer.com

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The pandemic has placed unique stresses on our community, with economic anxiety — combined with worry for the well-being of loved ones — affecting our collective mental health. That’s why it’s important to remember that Peterborough has always had the arts to bring us together. For years, artists, art therapists, and community organizations in Peterborough have worked with the shared understanding that the arts can have a beneficial effect on our mental health.

“Over the last 10 years I’ve been part of a number of art projects that engage with community members,” says John Marris, a community artist and consultant based in Peterborough. “Particularly those who face marginalization through poverty, disability and mental illness.”

Over the years — and to this day — a number of local artists in Peterborough have been involved in projects at The Mount Community Centre, the Youth Emergency Shelter (YES), Peterborough Regional Health Centre, and the Abbey Retreat Centre cancer care facility — to name only a few.

“There are many local artists involved in these projects,” says Brian Nichols, a Peterborough-based artist and psychotherapist who uses art therapy in his practice. “We don’t teach artmaking — we explore possibilities with folks who attend. It’s usually not possible to discern who is the ‘teacher’ and who is the ‘student.’ We’re all in it together, and that’s the fun of it.”

Prior to COVID-19, the open studios program at The Mount Community Centre had between 20 and 30 participants each week. Now, the program is limited to eight people who must register to attend, and must be residents at The Mount.

“Brian and I have just completed a six-week program of weekly art making sessions at The Mount for Mount residents,” says Marris. “Historically, before COVID-19, Brian was facilitating a roster of artists working in sessions that were open to the whole community to drop in and make art. This had been going on for two years.”

The pandemic has made these kinds of practices more challenging. Fortunately, there are innovative ways to work around the restrictions.

“I’ve just been involved in a pilot project where folks were sent a package of fabric and fibres, needles and thread and invited to ‘Take a Thread and Follow it,’” says Nichols. “The pilot was created for people living with health challenges.”

Nichols says he often leaves out the word “art,” as it can intimidate or exclude some people. Instead, he thinks of the practice as simply “making stuff.” The idea is to make the process as open as possible.

“Not everyone can be a Picasso,” says Marris, “but everyone has the capacity to express themselves, and needs to.”

Whether one considers oneself a serious artist or not, these kinds of programs, and the active involvement of both artists and non-artists, have been proven to have real societal benefit.

“There’s a ton of data now on some almost miraculous healing effects of immersion in various forms of art,” says Gord Langill, director of programs and services for the Canadian Mental Health Association, Haliburton, Kawartha, Pine Ridge. “Many mainstream community mental health programs in our communities now offer expressive arts groups and activities.”

There is great diversity in how arts and mental health can interact. There is Expressive Arts Therapy, the form of therapy Nichols employs, which is a proven tool for all sorts of healing, whether physical, mental, neurological or spiritual. There are galleries like Artspace, an artist-run centre in Peterborough, which has a history of supporting mental health recovery work. And then there are multidisciplinary arts organizations like Workman Arts — one of Langill’s favourites — which promotes a greater understanding of mental health and addiction.

“I have collaborated with Workman Arts on projects in my field of Early Psychosis Intervention, hosting visual and performance art exhibits at our conferences,” he says. “All of the work is produced by people living with mental health issues. For these shows, we brought visual art pieces and the young artists who created them from all over Ontario to our conferences in Toronto. They are always so moving for audiences, so empowering for artists.”

Many of these approaches have one thing in common: they bridge the individual creative experience with a sense of community. This can help to address mental health issues that are connected to social isolation.

“There is a lot to be said for thinking of art as a collective experience,” says Annie Jaeger, a Peterborough-based visual artist. “Sit in a theatre, or listen to music, or read the same book — it is not entirely a solitary enjoyment. I think that’s kind of profound.”

That said, it would be wrong to assume that all artists are necessarily engaged in self-therapy. Though there is plenty of evidence to support the mental health benefits of art — for individuals, as well as for the community at large — the practice of making art is multifold.

“I resist the ‘art as therapy’ characterization,” says Jaeger. “Certainly, it is therapeutic — but so is fresh air. We need it.”

What is clear is that artmaking, and the appreciation of that making, can help to create community, which is good for the mental health of us all. It can empower and enrich, providing, in Brian Nichols’ words — “another way to think about and imagine the world.”

And that world can be an interesting an inspiring place, perhaps a little brighter than the one we inhabit in the day-to-day. As the celebrated Peterborough poet PJ Thomas says in the poem “Crimson Flowers,” from the recently released collection, Undertow: “ … the weather always changes, / and we will someday have / clear sailing again.”

Tim Wilson is a freelance journalist working in Canada and Mexico. In his native Canada, for his nonfiction writing he has received a CBC Canadian Literary Award (first) and a National Magazine Award (gold). Writing as TE Wilson, he is also the author of the Detective Sánchez series of crime novels.

EC3

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This series of articles about the arts, culture and heritage sector in Peterborough is presented by the Electric City Culture Council (EC3).

EC3 is a not-for-profit service organization supporting the arts, culture and heritage sector in Peterborough and the surrounding region.

EC3 provides strategic leadership, research, resources and connections that build and strengthen the sector.

EC3, along with the Community Foundation of Greater Peterborough, is currently raising funds for the Peterborough Arts Alive Fund, to provide Strategic Recovery and Resilience Grants for local arts organizations affected by COVID-19. You can donate at https://cfgp.ca/project/arts-alive-fund/.

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Three to See Saturday: Churchill lights, SNAP art sale and the awesome VISSIA – Edmonton Journal

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Holiday Light Up: The Downtown Business Association is teaming up with multiple partners to add a little warm glow to the core, and being outside we can all easily keep our distance. Six installations will be rolled out at different downtown locations over the next week, lit in stages though Jan. 8 in the evenings. The first two are Transformation: Promise and Wisdom by Sharon Rose Kootenay and Jason Symington — with an assist form The Works Art & Design Festival — and Winter Wonder by Vicky Mitall, and can now be viewed at Sir Winston Churchill Square. New installations around the inner grid will be updated on the DBA website — edmontontondowntown.com/holidaylightup.

Holiday Light Up has begun on Churchill Square, adding new outdoor features over the next couple weeks. Photo by supplied

Details: Every night at — so far — Churchill Square, no charge

SNAP Annual Members Show & Sale: From personal experience I can tell you this is one of the easiest and most appreciated ways of getting your “happy season” shopping out of the way, the gift of magnificent, meticulously-crafted art — now just a click away thanks to the hated 2020 plague. That said, if you book ahead at snapartists.com, you can still wander through the space. “When people make an appointment they have the entire gallery to themselves for 30 minutes,” explains SNAP exec April Dean. “The whole show is up and framed in the gallery and it looks beautiful. There’s 85 framed prints up, ready to deck your halls, if you will.” If you can’t make it Saturday, don’t worry, show’s up though Dec. 19, at which point the hardworking staff will take a break and be back in the new year, just another thing about 2021 that’s going to be awesome.

No Feeling is Final by Laurel Westlund is on sale at SNAP. Photo by supplied
Veiled Immersion: Suspension by Liz Ingram is on sale at SNAP. Photo by supplied

Details: noon on at SNAP Gallery (10572 115 St.) or online at snapartists.com

VISSIA: If all that sounds a little too “near any other human” for you, it’s about time you spent some virtual time with local singer Alex Vissia, who’ll be having some musical quality time with her fans and having a party to celebrate the release of her new single, About Moving On. This all happens on facebook.com/vissiamusic, you can do it!

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