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High art: Banksy and Warhol works to adorn Toronto pot shop – Yahoo Canada Finance

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The Tokyo Smoke store at 21 Bloor St. E. (Provided)
The Tokyo Smoke store at 21 Bloor St. E. (Provided)

A downtown Toronto cannabis store is featuring works by famed British street artist Banksy and American pop art icon Andy Warhol.

The Tokyo Smoke location at 21 Bloor St. E is owned by Toronto-based filmmaker Rob Heydon.

The art from Heydon’s private collection will include “never-before-seen in Canada” pieces by Banksy, as wells some of the artist’s most celebrated works. The store will also feature pieces from other “disruptive artists,” including Andy Warhol, as part of a permanent exhibit.

“In these strange times, it felt fitting to allow customers to browse, shop and learn about cannabis while enjoying some art, while waiting patiently as we practise social distancing,” Heydon stated in a news release on Monday.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Tokyo Smoke, a brand owned by cannabis giant Canopy Growth (WEED.TO)(CGC), currently has five stores open throughout the city.&nbsp;” data-reactid=”27″>Tokyo Smoke, a brand owned by cannabis giant Canopy Growth (WEED.TO)(CGC), currently has five stores open throughout the city. 

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="This new location is steps from one of Toronto’s poshest shopping districts, dubbed the “Mink Mile” for its concentration of luxury brands like Hermes and Prada. Cannabis retailer Fire &amp; Flower (FAF.TO) has been renting pricy retail space on the same stretch of Bloor Street for a store that has yet to open due to regulatory delays.” data-reactid=”28″>This new location is steps from one of Toronto’s poshest shopping districts, dubbed the “Mink Mile” for its concentration of luxury brands like Hermes and Prada. Cannabis retailer Fire & Flower (FAF.TO) has been renting pricy retail space on the same stretch of Bloor Street for a store that has yet to open due to regulatory delays.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Jeff Lagerquist is a senior reporter at Yahoo Finance Canada. Follow him on Twitter @jefflagerquist.” data-reactid=”29″>Jeff Lagerquist is a senior reporter at Yahoo Finance Canada. Follow him on Twitter @jefflagerquist.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Download the Yahoo Finance app, available for&nbsp;Apple&nbsp;and&nbsp;Android.” data-reactid=”30″>Download the Yahoo Finance app, available for Apple and Android.

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An art book to leaf through – St. Albert TODAY

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DETAILS

Very Fine Art Projects for Artists and Educators
by Rayma Peterson
93 pages
$33.25
Self-published
Available on amazon.ca

In one new and concise volume, you can find all of the fruits and flora of Rayma Peterson’s career as an art educator. Twenty-five years in the making, the genesis of Very Fine Art Projects for Artists and Educators might easily have begun when she was a child “growing up with a paintbrush in her hand” thanks to her artist mother. It definitely flourished, however, when she was a post-secondary arts student in her native United States.

“I really didn’t like how some of the professors were teaching art,” she explained. “I can’t speak for the U of A but there were professors who were trying to force you into their mould, and I didn’t like that.”

Eventually, she graduated and soon after found her artistic inspiration with the plants in the window of her friend’s place. She fell in love with their different shapes and colours, which drew her back to school to get a botany degree. After that, she received her education degree, specializing in elementary art and science. After a period of living in Barrhead, things really started to sprout.

“People started asking me to teach their kids. I started doing that in Barrhead and I volunteered in my children’s classes teaching. Then I started doing professional development workshops and conferences, and I started marking art lessons for Alberta Distance Learning. I did all kinds of things. The art teaching really took off, especially when I moved here to St. Albert,” she continued.

“I developed a whole Art 30 course for distance learning: I developed it and illustrated it. I have to say it’s one of the only courses that for Art 30 … it fulfills all the requirements for the curriculum for Art 30 and it’s been translated into French for the French schools and classes. I’ve had a lot of interesting experiences there. I ended up teaching a semester at the U of A. I taught a lot of art for the City of St. Albert. I substitute taught both for the school systems and for Alberta Distance Learning. I’ve taught every age from kindergarten through 12 including adults and artists and botanical artists and master gardeners.”

All she wants is to help instil and nurture the love of art in others.

This book, which is far from focused on botanical art, is a comprehensive manual that includes lessons on a vast range of different styles and methods, and draws on Indigenous art from different parts of the world as well.

It must have required much work to create a book such as this that is still easy to read and not too heavy on the hands.

“I developed the lessons … some of them I’ve totally developed myself and some were modified from magazine articles and art education magazines and books. I decided to do my own samples for the book, rather than dealing with copyright issues with student work. It took a really long time to do all those and write up all the lessons, and then I thought, ‘Well, what am I going to have for sections?’ I feel very strongly about drawing and how important it is. And so part of the book is almost like a mini course on drawing, even for people who are really inexperienced.”

The lessons also tap into her desire to bring people closer to nature.

“We live in this era of plant blindness, where people just aren’t terribly aware of plants and their environment, just trees and grass in the suburbs here and there. They’re so fascinating and beautiful, and have such interesting shapes and colours,” she said.

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Art Hounds: An audio play about understanding people who disagree politically – Minnesota Public Radio News

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Actor, singer and director Ben Lohrberg is looking forward to hearing the show “Understood” from Trademark Theater. The theater has adapted its 2018 stage play into an audio production, and Lohrberg looks forward to hearing how the COVID-accessible format changes the show. The play takes on the timely topic of how we connect with people with whom we disagree. It follows a young, separated couple who each start relationships with individuals who share very different political views. Written by Tyler Mills and directed by Tyler Michaels King, it’s a show about navigating relationships and finding common ground. The audio play streams from Thursday through Nov. 4. Pricing for digital tickets is pay-what-you-choose.

Photographer Jacinda Davis is planning to visit the Hutchinson Center for the Arts to see the new exhibit “Malaise” by fiber artist Liz Miller and beadwork artist Chris Allen. The title of the show reflects the uncertainty of the times, but Davis says she finds the bright colors of their work energizing. Liz Miller uses knotted ropes to make large sculptures, while Chris Allen’s fine beadwork creates textures on a smaller scale. The show runs through Nov. 13.

Theater artist Ariel Johnson of Burnsville, Minn., loves the work of St Paul singer/songwriter Hannah Bakke, who writes folk and comedy music for mandolin and acoustic guitar. Bakke describes herself as “three shots of espresso with a dash of nutmeg; energetic, sweet and will remain fresh for up to nine months if stored properly.” During the pandemic, Bakke has been performing “little free concerts” outside of people’s homes in the Twin Cities area, which will continue as long as weather permits this fall.

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5 Art Accounts to Follow on Instagram Now – The New York Times

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As the pandemic continues to devastate countries around the world, natural disasters bear down and Election Day draws nearer, I find myself struggling with opposite impulses: I want to keep up with the news, and I want to escape into pleasure and imagination. Instagram offers both. Some accounts help me process current events, others provide aesthetic wonder, and still others manage the two at once. This list covers all the points on that spectrum. Consider it a creative coping mechanism for staying engaged during a trying time.

Many artists who started projects while on lockdown in March have stopped posting about them on Instagram, but Piotr Szyhalski is still going strong with his “Daily Covid-19 “Labor Camp Reports.” (“Labor Camp” is the framework within which Mr. Szyhalski has made art since 1998.) The series consists of black-and-white drawings that use the style and language of propaganda posters to capture the pain and absurdity of the pandemic, with heavy doses of sarcasm and rage at the federal government’s response. Some are direct, like one with a hand pointed at the viewer that implores “You! (Do Something)”; others are more abstract, like a sparse drawing of silhouetted birds above the words “Limitless Melancholy.” Either way, the works are meticulous but piercing, like a carefully released primal scream.

The work of Patience Zalanga, a freelance photojournalist who often covers the Movement for Black Lives, has a gripping, quiet intensity. She tends to forgo the drama of big action for the intimacy of portraits and smaller moments. For instance, a photo of young men inside a ransacked Office Depot seems to hit pause on the scene, as a hooded figure stops to check his phone; through that mundane gesture, Ms. Zalanga creates a feeling of familiarity, even tenderness. There’s also a welcome honesty to her captions, which include a mix of information about the images, personal comments and thoughts on the ethics of documentary photography. Ms. Zalanga, whose work has been featured in The Guardian, Minnesota Public Radio and Time, among other places, and who got her start in Ferguson, Mo., after the killing of Michael Brown, doesn’t pretend to be an all-knowing, objective observer, but lets her followers in on her process and works in community.

If Ms. Zalanga’s images speak to an experience of being Black in the United States, Jamie Lee Curtis Taete’s showcase a culture of whiteness. The Los Angeles–based photographer has an eye for distinctly American forms of consumerism and, and over the past few months he’s brought it to bear on events like pro-Trump rallies and coronavirus lockdown protests. Many of his pictures carry a tension between the ironic distance of the viewer and the subjects’ earnestness, encapsulated by a proudly carried sign or boldly emblazoned T-shirt. In one of my favorites, a yelling blond woman holds an American flag and a poster reading “Give me liberty or give me death,” while standing outside a Baskin Robbins. The intensity of her crusade of victimhood is palpable. As with so many of Mr. Taete’s photographs, I’m not sure whether to laugh or cry.

Part of what I love about the artist Tiffany Jaeyeon Shin’s account is that when I come upon her posts, I don’t necessarily know what I’m looking at. Maybe it’s an almost abstract image of bubbles, or maybe a pair of hands holding dirt, but I’m still wondering: Why this dirt? What’s she doing with it? Such murkiness is appropriate, since Ms. Shin is interested in processes we can’t see, like brewing, fermentation and the cultivation of mold, and how they reflect the complexities of society. It’s a delight to come across one of her photographs and be awed by the extent of the natural, and largely invisible, world. Her captions offer limited explanations — the dirt contained hyphae nuggets, which she brought home to feed — but just as quickly generate new questions, like what are hyphae? (The answer: parts of fungi.)

What does an exhibition look like when it doesn’t comprise objects in a gallery? The pandemic has prompted a variety of answers to this question, from bland online viewing rooms to printable PDF shows. The Flag Art Foundation’s inventive response has been to post “impossible exhibitions” on Instagram. Each one takes the form of a slide show, with a title, curatorial statement and checklist. What makes them “impossible” is that they can include anything available in image form, even if it no longer exists or is physically inaccessible. Eliminating the logistical aspect of curating has freed up people’s imaginations in intriguing ways. The miniature shows are cross-cultural, richly associative and sometimes deeply evocative. The curator Amy Smith-Stewart’s “In this short Life,” for example, is titled after an Emily Dickinson poem and in just nine slides evokes a spiritual sense of the fleetingness of life.

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