Connect with us

Art

High school art relaunches online – St. Albert TODAY

Published

 on


If you’re going through with.draw.all withdrawal, then the cure is nigh.

The Gazette’s online venue that featured local high school students’ art from the latter end – re: the COVID end – of the school year was an über-popular place to get your visual fix from the creative wunderkinds. The students discovered a new way to get their work out there and learned even more about the therapeutic value of artistic creation.

Now that school is back in session, a new collaborative art project is being launched.

Re/LAUNCH/ing is aimed at hitting the same high notes that its predecessor did, but with the added emphasis on the intrinsic value of art to the artist.

“The importance of the arts in education can’t be stressed enough. Not only is it helping our youth with their mental health in a really stressful time but it is providing an avenue to really work on developing their creative and critical thinking skills. This is going to become even more crucial in the near future. These times that we are living through will require creative thinkers to help society move forward,” expressed Colleen Hewitt, art teacher at Paul Kane High School.

Students will explore a medium inside of a specific theme as part of their art educations. A selection of their creative output will be featured on stalberttoday.ca on the last Thursday of each month.

“We are so grateful for another opportunity to showcase the talent of our St. Albert art students. The city gets to have a sneak peek of what is currently going on in the art programs. It is so important for these students to have a platform to share their creative ideas and thoughts. Finding ways to connect our students with the art community and see how other youth in St. Albert are demonstrating their creative path allows for collaborative growth,” stated Teresa Wallsten, art teacher at St. Albert Catholic High School.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Art

Art-loving couple helping Bayfield arts hub get off the ground – Toronto Star

Published

 on


A Bayfield-based arts non-profit is moving forward with plans for an arts centre in the Huron County community, thanks to a large donation from a local couple.

The Bayfield Centre for the Arts (BCA) has purchased a building on the village’s edge that will be transformed into a 1,115-square-metre visual arts hub.

“The concept of a Bayfield arts centre had been cooking for several years, but I wanted to formalize the vision . . . in terms of acquiring a building and bringing together a number of art organizations under one roof,” said centre president Leslee Squirrell.

Squirrell said the new facility will include an art gallery to showcase local artists and travelling exhibits, plus studio spaces and rooms for workshops.

A variety of arts will be featured, from new media and photography to painting, pottery and woodworking.

“We do have a big vision,” Squirrell said. “Even though the centre itself might be located in Bayfield, the purpose is to be a destination arts centre. It’s for the broader local community and those all over the county.”

Purchase of the building, at Highway 21 and Cameron Street, was made possible by a “significant financial donation” from Huron County residents Mac Voisin and Marcela Bahar.

“This state-of-the-art facility will benefit generations to come,” Voisin said. “(We are) delighted to be part of this project.”

Along with educational workshops and art showcases, Squirrell said they plan a mobile art truck that will let the centre take programming on the road across the region.

A film festival is also in the works, spurred on by the recent shooting of the movie Trigger Point in Bayfield.

The film’s director, Brad Turner, lives in the Lake Huron village seasonally and is a BCA adviser, Squirrell said.

The centre now uses a converted barn on Bayfield’s Main Street as a temporary home.

Amid the COVID-19 pandemic, the organization has been holding outdoor painting and photography workshops.

“We’re doing the best we can to continue to create our vision even though COVID has created obstacles,” Squirrell said.

Loading…

Loading…Loading…Loading…Loading…Loading…

She said the picturesque village is the perfect backdrop for a Southwestern Ontario arts hub, since it’s already a popular tourist destination with many local artists nearby.

“We’re an incredibly beautiful, ideal, creative type of community on Lake Huron,” Squirrell said.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Art

Art-loving couple helping Bayfield arts hub get off the ground – WellandTribune.ca

Published

 on


A Bayfield-based arts non-profit is moving forward with plans for an arts centre in the Huron County community, thanks to a large donation from a local couple.

The Bayfield Centre for the Arts (BCA) has purchased a building on the village’s edge that will be transformed into a 12,000-square-foot (1,115-square-metre) visual arts hub.

“The concept of a Bayfield arts centre had been cooking for several years, but I wanted to formalize the vision . . . in terms of acquiring a building and bringing together a number of art organizations under one roof,” said centre president Leslee Squirrell.

Squirrell said the new facility will include an art gallery to showcase local artists and travelling exhibits, plus studio spaces and rooms for workshops.

A variety of arts will be featured, from new media and photography to painting, pottery and woodworking.

“We do have a big vision,” Squirrell said. “Even though the centre itself might be located in Bayfield, the purpose is to be a destination arts centre. It’s for the broader local community and those all over the county.”

Purchase of the building, at Highway 21 and Cameron Street, was made possible by a “significant financial donation” from Huron County residents Mac Voisin and Marcela Bahar.

“This state-of-the-art facility will benefit generations to come,” Voisin said. “(We are) delighted to be part of this project.”

Along with educational workshops and art showcases, Squirrell said they plan a mobile art truck that will let the centre take programming on the road across the region.

A film festival is also in the works, spurred on by the recent shooting of the movie Trigger Point in Bayfield.

The film’s director, Brad Turner, lives in the Lake Huron village seasonally and is a BCA adviser, Squirrell said.

The centre now uses a converted barn on Bayfield’s Main Street as a temporary home.

Amid the COVID-19 pandemic, the organization has been holding outdoor painting and photography workshops.

“We’re doing the best we can to continue to create our vision even though COVID has created obstacles,” Squirrell said.

She said the picturesque village is the perfect backdrop for a Southwestern Ontario arts hub, since it’s already a popular tourist destination with many local artists nearby.

“We’re an incredibly beautiful, ideal, creative type of community on Lake Huron,” Squirrell said.

Loading…

Loading…Loading…Loading…Loading…Loading…

maxmartin@postmedia.com

Twitter.com/MaxatLFPress

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Art

Cycling art tour offers outdoor engagement | The Star – Toronto Star

Published

 on


Cyclists and art lovers across Richmond can participate in a cycling art tour developed by the city.

Part of the #RichmondHasHeart campaign, the tour aims to bring Richmondites together safely while maintaining physical distancing protocols. City staff said the activity was developed during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic to invite community members to engage with and access the arts in meaningful ways—while staying safe. The program is free, self-guided and contactless, and is available to participants on their own or in small groups.

“Public art is important because it creates civic pride, a sense of place, urban beautification, livability, cultural interpretation and sustainability for residents and visitors of Richmond,” says city public art planner Biliana Velkova.

The self-guided tour begins at City Centre Community Centre and takes participants through 12 public art exhibits. It is about 12 kilometres long and takes an hour and a half. Many of the art pieces included in the tour demonstrate the power and resilience of community, connection, togetherness, home and place, according to city staff. The pandemic provides a unique lens through which to view these works.

Velkova says the city often develops similar self-led cultural events, particularly those that engage with the public art collection.

“As our collection grows, we are always programming different ways to experience it,” she says.

Find more information on public art in the city go to www.richmond.ca/culture/publicart/guides.htm

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Trending