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Hospitalizations continue to spike as B.C. announces 762 new cases of COVID-19 and 10 more deaths – CBC.ca

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B.C. health officials announced another record high of 762 new cases of COVID-19 on Wednesday and 10 more deaths.

In a written statement, Provincial Health Officer Dr. Bonnie Henry and Health Minister Adrian Dix said there are 6,861 active cases in B.C. of people infected with the disease caused by the novel coronavirus. With the latest deaths, the provincial death toll stands at 320.

There are currently 209 people in hospital, with 58 in intensive care. There are now more people in hospital with COVID-19 and more active cases than at any other point in the pandemic to date. 

Henry and Dix pleaded with British Columbians to “put the brakes on the virus” and help slow the second wave of this disease by staying local and following public health advice to prevent transmission.

“This second surge is putting a strain on our health-care system, our workplaces and us all. We need to ease this pressure so we can continue to manage the virus in our province and also continue to do the many activities that are important to us,” they said.

“While your personal efforts may seem small or having little impact, the collective benefit to every community in every region is significant. Our safety layers are there to help protect us and they work best when we are all using them, all of the time.”

Public health is now actively monitoring 9,871 people across the province who are in self-isolation due to COVID-19 exposure. To date, there have been 24,422 confirmed cases of the disease in B.C.

Wednesday’s update also includes three new outbreaks in long-term care and assisted living at Agecare Harmony Court Estates in Burnaby, Menno Home in Abbotsford and Peace Villa in Fort St. John.

The majority of the new cases announced Wednesday continue to be in the Lower Mainland, with 481 or 63 per cent in the Fraser Health region and 210 or 28 per cent in the area covered by Vancouver Coastal Health.

People who live in those regions are currently subject to strict restrictions that include a prohibition on socializing with anyone outside of their household. Henry has also advised against any non-essential travel.

On Wednesday morning, Surrey Mayor Doug McCallum said the idea of mandating masks within the largest city in Fraser Health is on his mind, though for now he stills prefers to emphasize personal responsibility.

“I’m very, very close to saying that we should have mandatory masks,” McCallum told CBC.

Earlier Wednesday, Premier John Horgan said he is calling on the federal government to implement a “pan-Canadian approach” to non-essential travel during the COVID-19 pandemic.

He said the travel restrictions brought in a week-and-a-half ago in B.C., which advise against non-essential travel in and out of the Vancouver Coastal Health and Fraser Health regions, will be extended for “the next two weeks at least.”

Later in the day, the premier said he had connected with faith leaders from across the province and encouraged them to limit in-person festivities for upcoming celebrations including Gurpurab, Chanukah and Christmas.

“The actions that Hindus, Sikhs, Buddhists and Jains in B.C. took to avoid in-person gatherings for Diwali and Bandi Chhor Divas helped save lives and protect the most vulnerable,” Horgan said in a news release.

“There will be a time when we can all come together again like we did before. Until then, thank you to everyone for doing their part. Together, we’re showing that we’re stronger when we come together in common purpose.”

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COVID-19 update for Nov. 26: B.C. records deadliest day so far in pandemic with 13 deaths – Standard Freeholder

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The latest case numbers, exposure alerts and guidelines: Here’s your daily update with everything you need to know about COVID-19 in B.C.

The latest case numbers, exposure alerts and guidelines: Here’s your daily update with everything you need to know about COVID-19 in B.C.

Handout via REUTERS

Here’s your daily update with everything you need to know on the novel coronavirus situation in B.C. for Nov. 26, 2020.

We’ll provide summaries of what’s going on in B.C. right here so you can get the latest news at a glance. This page will be updated regularly throughout the day, with developments added as they happen.

Check back here for more updates throughout the day. You can also get the latest COVID-19 news delivered to your inbox weeknights at 7 p.m. by subscribing to our newsletter here.


B.C.’S COVID-19 CASE NUMBERS

As of the latest figures given on Nov. 25:
• Total number of confirmed cases: 29,086 (7,616 active)
• New cases since Nov. 24: 738
• Hospitalized cases: 294
• Intensive care: 61
• COVID-19 related deaths: 371 (13 new)
• Cases under public health monitoring: 10,270
• Recovered: 19,814
• Long-term care and assisted-living homes, and acute care facilities currently affected: 63

IN-DEPTH: COVID-19: Here are all the B.C. cases of the novel coronavirus


LATEST NEWS on COVID-19 in B.C.

3 p.m. – Health officials are set to share latest figures on COVID-19 in B.C.

Health officials are expected to update the number of COVID-19 cases, deaths and recoveries across the province.

12 a.m. –B.C. records 738 new cases, 13 additional deaths

Provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry said Wednesday that a further 738 people tested positive for COVID-19 and an additional 13 people have died from the respiratory disease. It was the pandemic’s deadliest day so far in British Columbia.

Of the new cases, 443 were recorded in the Fraser Health District, while 169 tested positive in Vancouver Coastal Health.

There are 294 people being treated in hospital with 61 in critical care.

There has been total of 29,066 positive tests and 371 COVID-19 related deaths in B.C. since the start of the pandemic. There have been more than 100 deaths in November alone.

There are 7,615 active cases in B.C.


B.C. GUIDES AND LINKS

COVID-19: Here’s everything you need to know about the novel coronavirus

COVID-19: Have you been exposed? Here are all B.C. public health alerts

COVID-19 at B.C. schools: Here are the school district exposure alerts

COVID-19: Avoid these hand sanitizers that are recalled in Canada

COVID-19: Here’s where to get tested in Metro Vancouver

B.C. COVID-19 Symptom Self-Assessment Tool



LOCAL RESOURCES for COVID-19 information

Here are a number of information and landing pages for COVID-19 from various health and government agencies.

B.C. COVID-19 Symptom Self-Assessment Tool

Vancouver Coastal Health – Information on Coronavirus Disease (COVID-19)

HealthLink B.C. – Coronavirus (COVID-19) information page

B.C. Centre for Disease Control – Novel coronavirus (COVID-19)

Government of Canada – Coronavirus disease (COVID-19): Outbreak update

World Health Organization – Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak

–with files from The Canadian Press

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Vancouver doctor, patient raising awarness about dangerous condition linked to COVID-19 – CTV News Vancouver

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VANCOUVER —
There’s a dangerous complication from COVID-19 you might not know about.

But 29-year-old Jordan Hoey and doctors at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver are trying to raise awareness about what it is and how serious it can be.

“Honestly, I was terrified. It was nothing I was expecting when I first got that positive diagnosis,” Hoey said in an interview with CTV News.

Last May, Hoey ended up testing positive for COVID-19 .

“My partner works in health care. There was an outbreak in her workplace,” he explained. “I was pretty scared. It was quite shocking, for sure.”

He battled the virus, but just as he thought he was turning a corner in the right direction, his health took a turn for the worse.

“A couple days after the fevers ended, I started getting a bit of chest pain and then noticing a little bit of red when I was coughing.”

And it didn’t improve.

“I coughed, filled the whole inside of the mask with blood. We knew it was time to go to the emergency room right away,” he said.

At St. Paul’s Hospital, he says, a CT scan revealed multiple pulmonary embolisms.

Dr. Anna Rahmani of the hospital’s thrombosis clinic said they’ve been seeing an increase in blood clots associated with COVID-19 infections.

The doctor told CTV News that while incidents of blood clots are higher in COVID-19 patients who are hospitalized, they are also seeing the condition in patients like Hoey who are young and otherwise healthy.

“Blood clots don’t really discriminate. They can affect any age, race,” Rahmani explained.

She said it’s crucial that people know the warning signs.

“Signs and symptoms of blood clot in the leg include tenderness, redness, increased swelling and pain,” Rahmani said.

But she said there are other signs people might be less familiar with.

“Symptoms and signs of blood clot in the lung (like Hoey experienced) include increasing shortness of breath, cough, bloody cough. Some people even experience dizziness and light headedness,” she said, urging anyone with symptoms to seek medical help right away.

Meanwhile, Hoey has only recently returned to working from home on a part-time basis as he continues to recover.

“I’m getting better but I’m not what I used to be yet,” he said.

“People need to be more aware of the serious side effects and serious complications of COVID itself. It’s not just a flu. It will take you out.”

On Thursday, Nov. 26 from 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., the thrombosis clinic at St. Paul’s will be presenting a free public Zoom session. You can find out more information here.

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Manitoba Human Rights Commission reports increased calls from mandatory mask opponents – CBC.ca

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Manitoba’s attempt to cut rising COVID-19 numbers appears to be paying off, officials say, but it’s leading to some public anger and a sharp rise in complaints to the province’s human rights commission.

“I would say our office is dealing with anywhere between 50 to 100 calls per month on the mask issue, from individuals who are telling us that they’re being denied access to retail premises or being asked to wear a mask for some reason or other,” Karen Sharma, the commission’s acting executive director, said Wednesday.

Overall call volumes are running about 30 per cent above normal, Sharma said.

“We tell people that the province’s current mask mandate, from a human rights perspective, is generally not an issue unless … that person does have a disability-related need not to wear a mask, in which case they might require some form of accommodation.”

Manitoba has implemented a series of increasingly tough restrictions over the last two months as COVID-19 numbers have spiked. The most recent orders mandate mask use in all indoor public areas, require restaurants and bars to close except for takeout and delivery, and forbid people from having guests in their home with some exceptions.

The public health orders also require that when someone has come into close contact with a known COVID-19 case, that person must self-isolate, even from other members of his or her household.

Chief Public Health Officer Dr. Brent Roussin said nurses and others who call known contacts of COVID-19 cases often face abuse.

“We are again hearing reports from public health contact tracers … of very angry people on the other end of the telephone line when they’re advising them that they’re contacts or cases and need to self-isolate,” Roussin said.

“When someone is isolating … the whole purpose is that should you become a case, which a certain proportion do, you’re going to have zero contacts. There’s not anyone you could have passed (the virus) to.”

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