Connect with us

Economy

House conservatives call to immediately reopen the economy | TheHill – The Hill

Published

on


Conservatives in the House are calling for the country to immediately reopen, raising concerns that the closure of nonessential businesses due to COVID-19 infringes on individuals’ rights and could have detrimental long-term effects on the economy.

While critics fear reopening the economy too soon could lead to a spike in cases, House Freedom Caucus Chairman Andy Biggs (R-Ariz.) — who was recently appointed to President TrumpDonald John TrumpWuhan lab denies claims of coronavirus origination Banks say they ran out of PPP funding ‘within minutes’ Trump defends testing capabilities, blasts critics during WH briefing MORE’s “Opening Up America Again” task force — said he believes there is a way to reopen areas that haven’t been heavily impacted by the coronavirus while at the same time minimizing the risk of furthering the outbreak.

That would require being strategic in isolating vulnerable populations, testing health care workers and maintaining social distancing and hygiene practices, he said.

ADVERTISEMENT

“What you did is, you basically took a sledgehammer to the whole economy. And we now have a huge structural deficit, we’ve really exacerbated our national debt issue and we’ve put 22 million-plus people out of work. I mean, come on, it’s time to open this thing up and trust the American people. I trust the American people, I think that they will get it they will I think they will try everything they can to avoid passing this disease on and I think I think what’ll happen is, is you’ll see that, that we are a much more mature people than some of the draconian authoritarian leaders think we are,” he told The Hill in an interview. 

“We all want to take care of those who are vulnerable, and we want to protect them but we also want to be able to live our lives. I think everybody’s important. The people that are huddled up there, they’re not being treated as if they have rights, so not being treated as if they’re important.”

Biggs questioned why certain businesses have been deemed essential while others have had to shut their doors amid the pandemic, adding that he believes some state and local governments have mishandled the response.  

“I’m still trying to understand where some of these governors and mayors think that they have the power to close down businesses. Explain to me why the marijuana dispensary, the liquor store drive-through, the big box stores, why are those essential, and folks who have put their life savings into maybe building a small restaurant or a furniture store or a florist or bike repair shop, why aren’t those allowed to be opened up?” he continued.

He added he’s concerned about the effects of keeping people sheltered in place long-term on people’s mental health. 

ADVERTISEMENT

“Nobody’s even talking about the other issues that come up: increased suicide, domestic violence, child abuse, alcohol and drug abuse. You know, all kinds of things happen when you are isolated.”

Rep. Jody HiceJody Brownlow HiceHouse GOP lawmakers urge Senate to confirm Vought Top conservatives voice concerns over restrictions on religious gatherings due to COVID-19 Top conservatives pen letter to Trump with concerns on fourth coronavirus relief bill MORE (R-Ga.), the communications chair for the Freedom Caucus, also expressed fears over the impact the stay-at-home orders will have on small businesses after the pandemic.  

“It is impossible for us to sustain this, the only way we get over this is to open the economy and let free enterprise to this job, let people get back to work. And we’ve got to do that as rapidly as possible,” he told The Hill, adding that they can’t take a “one shoe fits approach.”

The Georgia Republican said he also has concerns over the stimulus bills passed by Congress, as lawmakers look at passing the fourth measure to provide an additional $250 billion for the Paycheck Protection Program (PPP), which provides forgivable loans to small businesses struggling amid the pandemic. 

“The last bill was that was $2.3 trillion, and in that was $350 billion for small businesses. We are told that there are some 30 million small businesses, at this point about one and a half million have participated in PPP, and we’ve already used up $350 billion. And so we’re being asked for another $250 billion,” he said.  “But if there are 30 million small businesses, I mean, this could end up costing trillions and trillions of dollars.”

ADVERTISEMENT

Biggs spearheaded efforts on a letter sent to the president on Friday — signed by 11 Freedom Caucus members including Hice — expressing their desire to move swiftly to reopen the country. 

“The American people are resilient, but they have suffered tremendously under the weight of this closed economy,” they wrote. 

“Measures enacted by Congress have provided limited relief. More government is not the answer to these economic woes—reopening the economy is the answer. We are a free people with a free and fair market. The sooner we return to it, the sooner our economy will again thrive.” 

The lawmakers’ comments come as the United States has seen an uptick in protests against shelter-in-place policies across the country, with some states — including Florida which recently reopened its beaches — easing its policies. 

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Economy

Coronavirus 'a devastating blow for world economy' – BBC News

Published

on


The coronavirus pandemic is a “devastating blow” for the world economy, according to World Bank President David Malpass.

Mr Malpass warned that billions of people would have their livelihoods affected by the pandemic.

He said that the economic fallout could last for a decade.

In May, Mr Malpass warned that 60 million people could be pushed into “extreme poverty” by the effects of coronavirus.

The World Bank defines “extreme poverty” as living on less than $1.90 (£1.55) per person per day.

However, in an interview on Friday Mr Malpass said that more than 60 million people could find themselves with less than £1 per day to live on.

Mr Malpass told BBC Radio 4’s The World This Weekend: “It [coronavirus] has been a devastating blow for the economy.

“The combination of the pandemic itself, and the shutdowns, has meant billions of people whose livelihoods have been disrupted. That’s concerning.

“Both the direct consequences, meaning lost income, but also then the health consequences, the social consequences, are really harsh.”

Mr Malpass warned it’s been those who can least afford it who’ve suffered the most.

“We can see that with the stock market in the US being relatively high, and yet people in the poor countries being not only unemployed, but unable to get any work even in the informal sector. And that’s going to have consequences for a decade.”

The World Bank, along with its counterparts, has been providing support to the worst affected countries, but says much more is needed.

It is calling on commercial lenders such as banks and pension funds to offer debt relief to poor countries.

He would also like them to make the terms of their loans clearer, so other investors are more confident about putting money into those economies.

Targeted government support and measures to shore up the private sector are also vital to rebuild economies, the World Bank argues.

Investment and support would create jobs in areas like manufacturing, to replace those in the worst affected sectors, such as tourism, which may have been permanently lost.

‘Tensions and inequality’

Mr Malpass admits the damage to global trade, and inclinations to bring supply chains closer to home or erect trade barriers, are a challenge.

“When trade is reduced, that creates its own set of tensions and inequality… I’m sure [the global economy] will be interconnected in the future, maybe less than it was pre-COVID.”

But ultimately, Mr Malpass said the “catastrophe” could be overcome, and that people were “flexible, they’re resilient” .

“I think it’s possible to find paths, it’s hard work for countries and governments to do that.

“But we can encourage that effort… I’m an optimist, over the long run, that human nature is strong, and innovation is real. The world is moving fast and connectivity… has never been higher. And so that gives hope for the future.”

However, he admits the challenge is getting the right plans in place at the right time – and in the meantime, the pain could be considerable.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Economy

Guardians of the World Economy Stagger From Rescue to Recovery – Yahoo Canada Finance

Published

on


Guardians of the World Economy Stagger From Rescue to Recovery

View photos

(Bloomberg) — The world’s governments and central banks are shifting from rescue to recovery mode as the deepest slump since the Great Depression shows signs of bottoming out.

After rolling out trillions of dollars worth of measures to prevent their economies and markets from collapsing, they are now doubling down with even more spending to backstop a recovery as coronavirus lockdowns ease. In what counts for good news these days, Bloomberg Economics’ global GDP growth tracker showed economies contracted at an annualized rate of 2.3% in May, less than the 4.8% slump in April.

“Policy makers are moving from triage to recovery,” said Deutsche Bank Securities Chief Economist Torsten Slok. “They are realizing that more fiscal support will be needed to households and small businesses to prevent this liquidity crisis from turning into a solvency crisis.”

The new wave of stimulus has both governments and central banks moving in sync to continue flooding lenders, markets and companies with cheap credit at an unprecedented pace.

The European Central Bank last week expanded its asset purchases by 600 billion euros ($677 billion) to 1.35 trillion euros, and extended them until at least the end of June 2021. And Germany’s government agreed another 130 billion-euro fiscal stimulus push and said it will back a proposed new 750 billion-euro European Union recovery fund.

“Action had to be taken,” ECB President Christine Lagarde said in a press conference.

It’s a similar story in Asia.

Japan is planning another $1.1 trillion worth of spending in its biggest splurge yet and the central bank in May called an emergency meeting to roll out 30 trillion yen ($274 billion) of loan support for small businesses.

China last week unveiled another 3.6 trillion yuan ($508 billion) in spending and South Korea’s 76 trillion won ($63 billion) ‘New Deal’ fiscal package is its largest to date.

In the U.S., lawmakers continue to debate extra fiscal stimulus and the Federal Reserve, which meets on June 10, has just launched a new Main Street Lending Program, the latest in trillions of support it has already poured into the economy and markets.

While the Fed is unlikely to signal any moves when its officials gather this week, many economists expect it to harden its commitment to easy monetary policy later in the year and perhaps even start pursing a Japan-style campaign to control long-term borrowing rates.

The latest U.S. jobs numbers give some hope that the stimulus unleashed so far is beginning to kick in. A record 2.5 million workers were added by employers during May while unemployment declined to 13.3%, wrong footing economists who had forecast widespread job losses.

Read more: Economists Have Biggest Miss Ever in U.S. Jobs-Report Shocker

To be sure, there’s far from consensus that the latest wave of support will be enough to get growth back to where it was at the start of the year. Some of the steps being taken are merely to replace existing policies as they start to expire.

“It seems clear already approved packages are perceived to be not enough,” said Alicia Garcia Herrero, chief Asia-Pacific economist at Natixis SA.

There are other concerns that monetary policy can only do so much to revive growth before it loses its potency.

“How does the Fed actually get money to millions and millions of households and small businesses, that is difficult to do operationally,” former New York Federal Reserve Bank President William Dudley told Bloomberg Television.

“It’s much easier to intervene in the capital markets where the Fed can rely on counterparties, primary dealers and others,” Dudley said. “It is much more difficult to lend one by one to millions of different entities.”

Another risk is a return to austerity, even if it seems unlikely now. JPMorgan recently predicted a fiscal thrust of 3.3% of GDP this year and 1.5% drag next year.

U.S. senators have put the brakes on a $3 trillion fiscal package that was approved by lower house lawmakers. China’s government has ruled out a return to the kind of large scale stimulus it rolled out after the global financial crisis, preferring to keep a lid on rising debt.

Still, because the crisis meant economies were forced into shutdown, much of the emergency response so far has been less about driving growth and more about avoiding total collapse. It’s that dynamic which is leaving governments with little option but to borrow harder.

“We shouldn’t look at the positive immediate growth impact of the opening up process as being the rate of growth that may last,” said David Mann, chief economist for Standard Chartered Plc.

Creating jobs will be mission critical to cementing any upswing. That will need support for firms to retrain employees, incentives to hire older workers and for governments to continue with wage subsidies. More than one in six people have stopped working since the onset of the crisis, according to the International Labour Organization, which in April estimated more than 1 billion workers were at high risk of a pay cut or losing their job.

“A faster job market recovery will speed up the economic healing and reduce the risk from widening income inequality and social stress,” said Chua Hak Bin, senior economist at Maybank Kim Eng Research Pte.

Ultimately, the rescue of economies will go well beyond quantitative solutions and into the realm of story telling too, as policy makers will need to inject confidence back into wary consumers and executives, said Stephen Jen, who runs hedge fund and advisory firm Eurizon SLJ Capital in London.

“Human psychology is the same and is now as important as the mechanics of delivering the fiscal stimuli themselves,” he said.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com” data-reactid=”58″>For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Subscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.” data-reactid=”59″>Subscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.

©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Economy

Guardians of the world economy stagger from rescue to recovery – BNNBloomberg.ca

Published

on


The world’s governments and central banks are shifting from rescue to recovery mode as the deepest slump since the Great Depression shows signs of bottoming out.

After rolling out trillions of dollars worth of measures to prevent their economies and markets from collapsing, they are now doubling down with even more spending to backstop a recovery as coronavirus lockdowns ease. In what counts for good news these days, Bloomberg Economics’ global GDP growth tracker showed economies contracted at an annualized rate of 2.3 per cent in May, less than the 4.8-per-cent slump in April.

“Policy-makers are moving from triage to recovery,” said Deutsche Bank Securities Chief Economist Torsten Slok. “They are realizing that more fiscal support will be needed to households and small businesses to prevent this liquidity crisis from turning into a solvency crisis.”

The new wave of stimulus has both governments and central banks moving in sync to continue flooding lenders, markets and companies with cheap credit at an unprecedented pace.

The European Central Bank last week expanded its asset purchases by 600 billion euros (US$677 billion) to 1.35 trillion euros, and extended them until at least the end of June 2021. And Germany’s government agreed another 130 billion-euro fiscal stimulus push and said it will back a proposed new 750 billion-euro European Union recovery fund.

“Action had to be taken,” ECB President Christine Lagarde said in a press conference.

It’s a similar story in Asia.

Japan is planning another US$1.1 trillion worth of spending in its biggest splurge yet and the central bank in May called an emergency meeting to roll out 30 trillion yen (US$274 billion) of loan support for small businesses.

China last week unveiled another 3.6 trillion yuan (US$508 billion) in spending and South Korea’s 76 trillion won (US$63 billion) ‘New Deal’ fiscal package is its largest to date.

In the U.S., lawmakers continue to debate extra fiscal stimulus and the Federal Reserve, which meets on June 10, has just launched a new Main Street Lending Program, the latest in trillions of support it has already poured into the economy and markets.

While the Fed is unlikely to signal any moves when its officials gather this week, many economists expect it to harden its commitment to easy monetary policy later in the year and perhaps even start pursing a Japan-style campaign to control long-term borrowing rates.

The latest U.S. jobs numbers give some hope that the stimulus unleashed so far is beginning to kick in. A record 2.5 million workers were added by employers during May while unemployment declined to 13.3 per cent, wrong footing economists who had forecast widespread job losses.

To be sure, there’s far from consensus that the latest wave of support will be enough to get growth back to where it was at the start of the year. Some of the steps being taken are merely to replace existing policies as they start to expire.

“It seems clear already approved packages are perceived to be not enough,” said Alicia Garcia Herrero, chief Asia-Pacific economist at Natixis SA.

There are other concerns that monetary policy can only do so much to revive growth before it loses its potency.

“How does the Fed actually get money to millions and millions of households and small businesses, that is difficult to do operationally,” former New York Federal Reserve Bank President William Dudley told Bloomberg Television.

“It’s much easier to intervene in the capital markets where the Fed can rely on counterparties, primary dealers and others,” Dudley said. “It is much more difficult to lend one by one to millions of different entities.”

Another risk is a return to austerity, even if it seems unlikely now. JPMorgan recently predicted a fiscal thrust of 3.3 per cent of GDP this year and 1.5 per cent drag next year.

U.S. senators have put the brakes on a US$3-trillion fiscal package that was approved by lower house lawmakers. China’s government has ruled out a return to the kind of large scale stimulus it rolled out after the global financial crisis, preferring to keep a lid on rising debt.

Still, because the crisis meant economies were forced into shutdown, much of the emergency response so far has been less about driving growth and more about avoiding total collapse. It’s that dynamic which is leaving governments with little option but to borrow harder.

“We shouldn’t look at the positive immediate growth impact of the opening up process as being the rate of growth that may last,” said David Mann, chief economist for Standard Chartered Plc.

Creating jobs will be mission critical to cementing any upswing. That will need support for firms to retrain employees, incentives to hire older workers and for governments to continue with wage subsidies. More than one in six people have stopped working since the onset of the crisis, according to the International Labour Organization, which in April estimated more than 1 billion workers were at high risk of a pay cut or losing their job.

“A faster job market recovery will speed up the economic healing and reduce the risk from widening income inequality and social stress,” said Chua Hak Bin, senior economist at Maybank Kim Eng Research Pte.

Ultimately, the rescue of economies will go well beyond quantitative solutions and into the realm of story telling too, as policy makers will need to inject confidence back into wary consumers and executives, said Stephen Jen, who runs hedge fund and advisory firm Eurizon SLJ Capital in London.

“Human psychology is the same and is now as important as the mechanics of delivering the fiscal stimuli themselves,” he said.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Trending