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How long will it take to burn off these calories?: The controversial next step in nutrition labeling – Standard Freeholder

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Critics say putting exercise calorie counts on food packaging would only reinforce the notion that exercise earns people the right to eat ‘crappy foods’

A traditional nutrition label. Studies show the public consistently underestimates the number of calories in food. “Just putting numbers on a packet really has no relevance.”

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According to scientists, Brits consume, on average, 6,000 calories on Christmas Day alone.

So, in an experiment published last year in the British Medical Journal, U.K. researchers explored whether providing people with the amount of exercise required to burn off the calories in, say, a single piece of mincemeat pie (21 minutes of running) or one small Christmas pudding (a staggering 110-minute run) would help prevent weight gain over the holidays.

In fact, they found participants in the “brief intervention” group exposed to this new kind of food labelling ended the holidays weighing 0.5 kg less, on average, than a comparison group.

Now, in a new review and analysis that pooled data from 14 randomized controlled trials, some of the same collaborators are reporting that when labeling known as PACE — physical activity calorie equivalent — is displayed on menu items, people consume, on average, 65 fewer calories per meal compared with other types of labeling, or no labeling.

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It may not sound like much. However, the average person eats three meals a day, plus two snacks — five separate eating occasions where PACE might nudge people to reduce their total calorie intake by 200 to 250 calories a day, said Amanda Daley, of the School of Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences at Loughborough University.

“In the U.K., the guidance is that if you want to lose weight then you should look for a deficit of 500 calories per day, so already you could see how PACE could cut into that 500 calories,” she said.

The Royal Society for Public Health in the U.K. is already calling for PACE labeling on the front of food packaging.

But not everyone is so enthralled. Some worry it could lead to an exercise/eating disorder nightmare. “We know that many people with eating disorders struggle with excessive exercising, so being told exactly how much exercise it would take to burn off particular foods risks exacerbating their symptoms,” Tom Quinn, of the eating disorders charity Beat, told the BBC.

“Quite honestly, we have as a society, over quite a long time really, only focused on exercise as a means to manage weight or burn calories when it is poor at both,” said obesity specialist Dr. Yoni Freedhoff, an associate professor of family medicine at the University of Ottawa.

One advantage around PACE is that it tells people what it takes to burn that muffin or that Frappuccino

Freedhoff’s issue with the idea of putting exercise calorie counts on food packaging is that it would reinforce those messages, as well as the notion that exercise earns people the right to eat “crappy foods.” (In a related tweet, he also worried it could reinforce weight bias by suggesting people struggling with obesity are “lazy gluttons.”)

The idea that some “magical set of instructions” will lead everybody to make healthier choices is, well, magical thinking, he said, when the wider problem is the constant provision of junk food at every turn.

“And if you discourage the consumption of junk food and simultaneously discourage people from exercising, I don’t think that’s a public health win,” Freedhoff said.

Daley, however, argues that traditional nutritional labeling is difficult for the public to grasp and doesn’t provide any context or meaning. Many people don’t understand the meanings of calories or grams of fat in terms of energy balance, she and her coauthors wrote, and studies show the public consistently underestimates the number of calories in food. “Just putting numbers on a packet really has no relevance,” Daley said.

“One advantage around PACE is that it tells people what it takes to burn that muffin or that Frappuccino,” she said. It could help people decide whether the calories are “worth it.”


“We have as a society, over quite a long time really, only focused on exercise as a means to manage weight or burn calories when it is poor at both.”

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Some festive examples include: one thick slice of roast turkey (roughly 100 calories) would require 16 minutes of walking, three large roast potatoes (161 calories) 27 minutes of walking and one small Christmas pudding (1,280 calories) 110 minutes of running.

According to the formula, 100 calories is about 10 minutes of running and 20 minutes of walking for an 80kg man (the average weight for a man).

Daley said there is no evidence to date that physical activity campaigns lead to unhealthy or disordered eating. Obesity is related to cancer deaths, cardiovascular deaths and stroke, among other killers. “We’re interested in trying to save lives from those diseases,” she said.

Ultimately the researchers would like PACE to be seen on labels in supermarkets, on packages, and particularly on menus in restaurants and fast food outlets. “All those types of places where we eat high-calorie foods would be a really good place to start.”

There are some caveats: Most of the studies Daley and colleagues analyzed were small, and based on lab settings or “hypothetical meal selection scenarios,” not real life ones.

• Email: skirkey@postmedia.com | Twitter:

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51 new cases of COVID-19 announced in Manitoba on Sunday – CBC.ca

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There are 51 new cases of COVID-19 in Manitoba on Sunday, the province says in a news release, including 36 in the Winnipeg health region.

Another eight new cases are in the Interlake-Eastern Health region, and four are in the Southern Health region, the release says. Two new cases are in the Northern Health region and the remaining one is in the Prairie Mountain Health region.

More information will be released about the new cases if a risk to public health is identified.

There are 13 people hospitalized with COVID-19 in the province, the release says, including six in intensive care.

Five of those people, or a little over one-third, are attributed the Winnipeg health region, according to provincial data. Two of those people are in intensive care.

There are three people hospitalized with the illness are linked to the Prairie Mountain Health region (with two in intensive care) and three are attributed to the Southern Health region (with one in intensive care).

There is one person hospitalized with COVID-19 from the Northern Health region, and one person from the Interlake-Eastern health region is in intensive care.

Manitoba’s five-day test positivity rate — a rolling average of the proportion of COVID-19 tests that come back positive — is down slightly to 2.2 per cent, the release says.

There are now 589 active cases of the illness in Manitoba, including 490 — or 83 per cent — in the Winnipeg health region, according to provincial data.

There have been 1,880 cases of COVID-19 detected in Manitoba, the release says; 1,272 have recovered and 19 have died.

Masks being distributed

Manitoba Families will give out more than 227,000 reusable masks to its clients, the release says. That will come out to two per every adult in a household, and for kids aged five to nine. Older kids will instead get masks through their school or child-care provider, the release says.

That distribution will start in Winnipeg and continue across Manitoba in the coming weeks.

Starting Monday, people in Winnipeg and 17 surrounding communities will have to wear masks in all public indoor spaces and cap gatherings at 10 as the region moves to the orange — or “restricted” — level under the province’s pandemic response system.

The new rules will stay for at least four weeks, Manitoba’s top doctor said, which is roughly two incubation periods of the illness.

That timeframe, announced by Chief Provincial Public Health Officer Dr. Brent Roussin on Friday, includes Thanksgiving. The holiday falls on Oct. 12 this year.

The province is still working to increase capacity and reduce wait times at sites in Winnipeg as demand for COVID-19 testing spiked in response to increasing cases in the region.

On Saturday, 2,200 COVID-19 tests were done in Manitoba. There have now been 178,067 tests completed in the province since early February, the release says.

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Coronavirus: Latest developments in the Greater Toronto Area on Sept. 27 – Global News

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Here are the latest developments on the coronavirus pandemic in the Greater Toronto Area for Sunday:

Ontario reports nearly 500 cases

Ontario reported 491 new cases of the novel coronavirus on Sunday, bringing the total number of cases in the province to 49,831.

It’s the biggest single-day increase in cases since May 2 when 511 were reported.

“Locally, there are 137 new cases in Toronto with 131 in Peel, 58 in Ottawa and 58 in York Region,” Health Minister Christine Elliott said on Twitter.

“Sixty-three per cent of today’s cases are in people under the age of 40.”

Elliott said more than 42,500 additional tests have been completed, which is among all-time highs.

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Around 600 people possibly exposed at Toronto bar

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Toronto Public Health says around 600 people may have been exposed to the novel coronavirus after three staff members at a bar tested positive.

Officials said the possible exposure period is from Sept. 13 to Sept. 22 at the Regulars Bar on King Street, near Bathurst Street.

All known close contacts of the individuals who tested positive have been contacted, officials said. Anyone not contacted is viewed as low risk.

People who attended the bar are being advised to monitor for symptoms of COVID-19 for 14 days since their last visit and if symptoms develop, self-isolate and get tested.

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Toronto restaurant closed after employee tests positive

Reyna on King, a restaurant located near Parliament and King streets, is temporarily closed after an employee tested positive.

In a social media post, the restaurant said the employee last worked mid-week.

Neighbouring Reyna Bazaar is also closed for deep cleaning while employees are tested, the post said.

“Unfortunately, we have had to cancel all reservations for the next few days and will re-open as soon as we have the green light that our team has a clean bill of health and it is safe to re-open,” the restaurant said.

“We feel confident that this is a one-off incident as nobody else on the team was showing any symptoms and our health and safety procedures are very strict.”

© 2020 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

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1 new COVID-19 death, 58 new cases in Ottawa – CBC.ca

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Ottawa Public Health is reporting 58 new COVID-19 cases Sunday and one new death.

The city’s death toll now stands at 281.  There have been 4,063 cases of COVID-19 recorded in the nation’s capital since the start of the pandemic — and of those, 3,207 are considered resolved, approximately 79 per cent. 

Unlike yesterday, the majority of Sunday’s 58 cases are in people over age 30. 

There are now 575 confirmed active cases in the city, up eight since yesterday and an increase of 90 since the same time last week.

There are also 39 ongoing outbreaks at city institutions like long-term care facilities, child-care centres and schools.

Ontario reports 491 new cases, highest since May

The reports from OPH don’t necessarily reflect how many people tested positive for COVID-19 on the day they’re made public; rather, they indicate the number of new cases OPH is notified of as of 2 p.m. the previous day.

Provincewide, another 491 new cases of COVID-19 were reported Sunday, the highest number since May 2, and two new deaths.

As of 10:30 a.m., there had been 2,839 deaths in Ontario from COVID-19, according to provincial figures.

In western Quebec, meanwhile, health officials have confirmed 14 new cases since yesterday.

The region has had 1,265 cases of COVID-19 and 34 deaths since the pandemic began.

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