Connect with us

Health

How the technology used to make COVID-19 vaccines could improve flu shots – CBC.ca

Published

 on


The Dose21:56What’s the latest in flu vaccines?

Some experts fear this year’s flu season will be severe – especially with the pandemic still raging in many parts of Canada. Dr. Brian Goldman speaks with Dr. Susy Hota, Medical Director for Infection Prevention and Control at University Health Network in Toronto, about the latest developments in flu vaccines. 21:56

With flu season fast approaching, people who haven’t been vaccinated against COVID-19 or qualify for a third dose can safely get shots to protect them against both illnesses in the same visit, say health experts.

They anticipate that in the future, by applying the latest advances in mRNA technology, it may be possible to vaccinate a person against COVID-19 and the seasonal flu with a single vaccine. 

That’s because vaccine developers have been working on developing influenza vaccines using mRNA technology, the kind used in the Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna COVID-19 vaccines, since before the pandemic, said Susy Hota, medical director of infection prevention and control at the University Health Network in Toronto. 

Several are already at the clinical trial stage.

No COVID-19 and flu combo vaccine is that far along. 

Hota says it would be incredibly convenient to leverage mRNA technology to better protect people against the flu.  

“What the future may hold is having one single, combined vaccine that addresses multiple infections that circulate at the same time. So that could be COVID 19 and influenza,” she told Dr. Brian Goldman, host of CBC Radio’s The Dose podcast.

“We’re not there yet. But wouldn’t that be nice, coming in for your one respiratory virus injection that will cover you for that season?” 

People get flu shots in Calgary last October. The vaccinations are available at pharmacies and primary care offices. (Leah Hennel/Alberta Health Services)

Flu viruses mutate frequently as they circulate around the world, Hota said. By the time scientists see what strains are taking off in the Southern Hemisphere and predict what to put in flu vaccines for people in the Northern Hemisphere, there could be mismatches.

On average, flu vaccines are about 40 to 60 per cent effective in protecting you from infection, Hota said. 

Since people infected with flu are at higher risk for having heart attacks and other cardiac problems than the general population, flu vaccinations save lives, she said.

“If we were to see too many COVID-19 and influenza patients coming to our hospitals, that could paralyze the system,” she said.

Speed is of the essence to beat flu

Vaccine makers are trying to catch up with the mutating virus so that what’s in their vials better matches the flu strains we might encounter from others who are coughing or perhaps talking a bit too close. 

That’s where mRNA technology comes in. Experts say perhaps they could observe flu activity worldwide for a longer period and then take advantage of the speed of mRNA vaccine manufacturing to add circulating flu strains to vaccines in time to better protect the public.

Dr. Susy Hota says getting two jabs at the same time to protect against COVID-19 and the flu is well worth it. (Craig Chivers/CBC)

Scott Halperin, a pediatric infectious diseases specialist and professor at Dalhousie University in Halifax, leads clinical trials for influenza and other vaccines at the Canadian Centre for Vaccinology in Halifax.

He says mRNA technology could likely accelerate the manufacturing of flu vaccines compared with the time-consuming approach of growing the virus in chicken eggs that’s used today.

At least three companies say they’re starting Phase 1 human safety trials of mRNA flu-only vaccines to check if the side-effects mirror those from conventional flu vaccines, such as a sore arm or fever. 

To eventually combine COVID-19 and flu protection in one jab, researchers first need to test that mRNA technology can be applied safely and effectively to influenza viruses. 

New technology brings better immunity

Moderna and Pfizer’s mRNA vaccines for COVID-19 include the genetic instructions to make a modified spike protein from the virus. Once the vaccine is injected into the body, human cells use the instructions to make copies of the spike protein for the immune system to learn to recognize.

WATCH | Flu shots recommended amid COVID’s 4th wave:

Doctors urging flu shots to prevent further health-care strain

10 days ago

Canadians are being urged to get flu shots as soon as possible because doctors expect the flu season to be much worse than last year, when there were very few cases. They want to avoid further strain on the health-care system already struggling with COVID-19. 3:30

For the three mRNA seasonal influenza vaccines in clinical trials now, companies need to show that combining flu strains this way doesn’t lessen the effectiveness of the immune response before regulators like Health Canada consider approval.

Alyson Kelvin, a scientist at the Vaccine and Infectious Disease Organization (VIDO) at the University of Saskatchewan, has spent years studying different influenza vaccines and also works on COVID-19 vaccine candidates.

“It seems that we do have this nice, broader immunity from mRNA vaccine technology,” Kelvin said. “Could you somehow target more than one influenza strain at once?”

Even if the answer is yes, Kelvin said, it’s a leap to go from using one spike protein from SARS-CoV-2, the coronavirus that causes COVID-19, to also covering four circulating influenza virus strains, as the current flu shots do, with a single shot.

“It’s exciting, but I think that we need to really complete the investigation,” Kelvin said. The all-in-one flu and COVID-19 vaccination studies haven’t reached clinical trials in humans, which normally take years to complete.

Researchers recognize that better strategies are needed to vaccinate against flu to achieve more protective responses, she said. 

Until then, public health officials hope people will continue wearing masks where necessary and washing their hands to protect against all of the pathogens that sicken people of all ages during respiratory virus season.

Adblock test (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Health

COVID-19 immunization clinics open to B.C. kids ages five to 11 today – Toronto Star

Published

 on


VICTORIA – Children in British Columbia between five and 11 years old can start getting shots of a pediatric COVID-19 vaccine today.

Provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry said last week that about 350,000 children are eligible to receive the modified dose of the Health Canada-approved Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine.

Health Canada approved the pediatric shot for use in Canada after an independent scientific review confirmed the first vaccine formulated for younger children is safe and effective.

Henry says the same vaccine has been administered to more than three million children in the United States and there have been no “safety signals” as a result.

She says the vaccine will help children and families safely return to activities that benefit physical and mental health.

Dr. Penny Ballem, the executive lead for B.C.’s vaccination drive, has said she expects the full children’s immunization effort including second doses to conclude by the end of January.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Nov. 29, 2021.

Adblock test (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Health

COVID-19 immunization clinics open to B.C. kids ages five to 11 today – Times Colonist

Published

 on


VICTORIA — Children in British Columbia between five and 11 years old can start getting shots of a pediatric COVID-19 vaccine today. 

Provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry said last week that about 350,000 children are eligible to receive the modified dose of the Health Canada-approved Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine.

Health Canada approved the pediatric shot for use in Canada after an independent scientific review confirmed the first vaccine formulated for younger children is safe and effective. 

Henry says the same vaccine has been administered to more than three million children in the United States and there have been no “safety signals” as a result.

She says the vaccine will help children and families safely return to activities that benefit physical and mental health.

Dr. Penny Ballem, the executive lead for B.C.’s vaccination drive, has said she expects the full children’s immunization effort including second doses to conclude by the end of January.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Nov. 29, 2021.

The Canadian Press

Adblock test (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Health

COVID-19: Children between five and 11 are eligible for vaccinations starting Monday – Vancouver Sun

Published

 on


Health Canada approved the Pfizer vaccine for children aged five to 11 on Nov. 19. This vaccine uses a lower dose of 10 micrograms — one-third of the dose given to older children and adults

Article content

Children in B.C. between five and 11 years old start receiving the first doses of their COVID-19 vaccines on Monday.

Advertisement

Article content

More than 90,000 out of the 350,000 eligible children, or 26 per cent, in that age category were registered a week before the rollout, according to the B.C. government.

The government’s own surveys show that most parents support getting vaccines for their young children, but there are some whose views might keep the vaccination rate lower for this age category.

Of B.C. parents who responded, 58 per cent will register to vaccinate their children right away, while another 18 per cent planned to wait, and nearly 25 per cent said they are not sure they will do it, according to Penny Ballem, the executive lead for B.C.’s immunization efforts.

A parent or legal guardian has to give verbal consent ahead of a child being vaccinated, according to Ballem.

Advertisement

Article content

Health Canada approved the Pfizer vaccine for children aged five to 11 on Nov. 19. This vaccine uses a lower dose of 10 micrograms that is one-third of the dose given to older children and adults.

COVID-19 information from the B.C. Centre for Disease Control from Nov. 25 shows that 80 per cent of British Columbians at the next age group up, aged 12 to 17, are now fully vaccinated and more than 87 per cent have a first dose.

There are varying rates in different health authorities, however. In Fraser, Vancouver Coastal and Vancouver Island, it is higher at 82 per cent, 89 per cent and 83 per cent, respectively. In Interior, it was 70 per cent and in Northern, it was 59 per cent.

Within authorities, there is also a wide spectrum. As of Nov. 23, Enderby and Kettle Creek in the Interior authority had only 38 per cent of 12- to 17-year-olds double vaccinated, while Kimberley posted 80 per cent. In Vancouver Coastal, Bella Coola Valley had 59 per cent of 12- to 17-year-olds double vaccinated, while North Vancouver was at 93 per cent.

Advertisement

Article content

Between Oct. 27 to Nov. 25, the number of average daily cases per 100,000 people among the double vaccinated for this 12 to 17 age group across B.C. was 2.5. Among those who had one vaccination, the number of average daily cases per 100,000 people was 8.2. And for the unvaccinated, the figure was 46.8 per 100,000.

For that same period, in the category of 0-11 year olds, who are all unvaccinated, the number of average daily cases per 100,000 people was 16.8.

“I think the most important thing is that vaccinations be readily available for all children and families,” said Teri Mooring, president of the B.C. Teachers’ Federation.

“For families where it’s not convenient for them to book an appointment in a separate clinic or perhaps they work long hours or there are other various individual circumstances, we think there should be an option (for COVID-19 vaccination) in schools as well.”

Advertisement

Article content

Mooring said that “it was a concern with the 12- to 17-year-olds as well and what we’re seeing in some parts of the province, where we have vaccine hesitancy, we are still those (vaccination) numbers lag behind. We don’t want that to be the case for the five to 11-year-olds.”

Youth aged 12 to 18 have to carry a B.C. Vaccine card, or have a trusted adult carry one for them, to go to restaurants and attend indoor, organized events. Unlike adults, they don’t have to also show government-issued identification. Children aged five to 11 are not be required to show proof of vaccination.

jlee-young@postmedia.com

Advertisement

Comments

Postmedia is committed to maintaining a lively but civil forum for discussion and encourage all readers to share their views on our articles. Comments may take up to an hour for moderation before appearing on the site. We ask you to keep your comments relevant and respectful. We have enabled email notifications—you will now receive an email if you receive a reply to your comment, there is an update to a comment thread you follow or if a user you follow comments. Visit our Community Guidelines for more information and details on how to adjust your email settings.

Adblock test (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Trending