Connect with us

News

Hudbay Minerals resumes production at Lalor mine

Published

 on

yellow excavator

Hudbay Minerals Inc, a Canada-based diversified mining company, said late Thursday that it has resumed operations at its Lalor mine, where production was halted due to a fatality last week.

Hoisting activities resumed on June 23 and production has returned to normal levels at the mine, located in the town of Snow Lake in Manitoba, the company said in a statement.

The fatality at Lalor mine occurred when a worker employed by a service provider was fatally injured from a fall while working at a height.

(Reporting by Juby Babu in Bengaluru, Editing by Sherry Jacob-Phillips)

Continue Reading

News

How can Canada avoid a fourth wave of COVID-19? Doctors weigh in – CTV News

Published

 on


TORONTO —
After federal COVID-19 modelling showed that the fall could bring about yet another surge in COVID-19 cases with the Delta variant spreading rapidly, doctors say that the best way to avoid a fourth wave is to vaccinate, test, trace and isolate.

Canada’s Chief Public Health Officer, Dr. Theresa Tam, released modelling on Friday that indicates cases are beginning to rise as a result of the more contagious Delta variant, but there is still time to flatten the curve.

“There’s no summer vacation for getting second doses and first doses, because we don’t have that leeway,” Dr. Lisa Barrett told CTV News Channel on Saturday.

She added that people who are delayed in getting their shots, first or second, need to make an effort to get it as soon as possible.

“Before we get into all of these back to school and other situations in a respiratory virus season like the fall, we’ve got to keep going,” she said.

While breakthrough cases have happened among vaccinated people, they remain rare and vaccines remain the best defense against COVID-19.

”It very much is that these vaccines are amazing, and the cornerstone of our prevention toolbox, and our control,” said Barrett. “The limiting of virus really, really depends on people getting two doses of this vaccine.”

There are other steps Canadians can take to continue protecting themselves, vaccinated or not, and they’re no different than what’s been urged since early on in the pandemic: masking and testing.

“There’s some simple tools out there, in addition to vaccines, like masking and testing, that would reduce the risk of this being a disease of the unvaccinated,” Barrett said.

While the modelling shows the potential for a fourth wave in the fall, an infectious disease specialist said that models are only as good as the variables put into them, but that the possibility of another surge is possible.

“It’s possible that we could have a sort of fourth wave. I would guess that it could be a muted fourth wave, because unlike previous waves, we do have vaccinated people,” Dr. Ronald St. John, former director-general of the Centre for Emergency Preparedness and Response, told CTV News Channel on Saturday.

While provinces begin to loosen restrictions, or in some cases do away with them altogether, one doctor says that it’s the unvaccinated population who will be hit hardest by a fourth wave.

“The fourth wave is certainly going to affect those who are unvaccinated, but I think what we really need to start looking at are, who are these unvaccinated populations?” Dr. Veronica McKinney, director of Northern Medical Services at the University of Saskatchewan, told CTV News Channel on Saturday.

She said that unvaccinated populations need to be identified in order for doctors and experts can work with them, so that they can be comfortable getting vaccinated to protect themselves and others.

“The way that it’s been portrayed is that it’s an individual choice and that people are just being resistant but I really believe that now is the time to look at what are the pieces that have led to this in the system?” she said.

Policies need to change to encourage people to get vaccinated, but also to take time off in the event they do get sick, added McKinney.

“We need to look at those policies that are making it difficult, those people who don’t get sick time, who don’t want to be tested because they don’t want to be off work but also not necessarily trusting what is being presented,” she added.

Even with getting more shots in arms, McKinney said that provinces such as Saskatchewan and Alberta have lifted public health measures necessary to test, trace and isolate in a way to prevent a fourth wave.

“Part of the challenges that our communities are now dealing with is the fact that there are no longer public health orders that we can use to try to help in terms of keeping people isolated if they need be, testing, all of those pieces that were very helpful, but are no longer existent [Saskatchewan],” she said.

Adblock test (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

News

Coronavirus: What's happening in Canada and around the world on Saturday – CBC.ca

Published

 on


The latest:

  • 2 travellers arriving in Toronto from U.S. fined $20K each for fake vaccination documents.
  • Have a coronavirus question or news tip for CBC News? Email: COVID@cbc.ca

In Europe, thousands of people protested France’s special virus pass by marching through Paris and other cities on Saturday. Most demonstrations were peaceful, but some protesters in Paris clashed with riot police, who fired tear gas.

Some 3,000 security forces deployed around the French capital for a third weekend of protests against the pass, which will be needed soon to enter restaurants and other places. Police took up posts along the city’s Champs-Élysées to guard against an invasion of the famed avenue.

With virus infections spiking and hospitalizations rising, French lawmakers have passed a bill requiring the pass in most places as of Aug. 9. Polls show a majority of French support the pass, but some are adamantly opposed. The pass requires a vaccination or a quick negative test or proof of a recent recovery from COVID-19 and mandates vaccine shots for all health-care workers by mid-September.

Tensions flared in front of the famed Moulin Rouge nightclub in northern Paris during what appeared to be the largest demonstration. Lines of police faced down protesters in up-close confrontations during the march. Police used their fists on several occasions.

Protesters face off with riot police in front of Paris landmark Moulin Rouge nightclub on Saturday. (Geoffroy Van der Hasselt/AFP/Getty Images)

As marchers headed eastward and some pelted officers with objects, police fired tear gas into the crowds, plumes of smoke filling the sky. A male protester was seen with a bleeding head, and a police officer was carried away by colleagues. Three officers were injured, the French media quoted police as saying. Police, again responding to rowdy crowds, also turned a water cannon on protesters as the march ended at the Bastille.

A calmer march was led by the former top lieutenant of far-right leader Marine Le Pen who left to form his own small anti-European Union party. But Florian Philippot’s new cause, against the virus pass, seems far more popular. His contingent of hundreds marched on Saturday to the Health Ministry.

Among those not present this week was François Asselineau, leader of another tiny anti-EU party, the Popular Republican Union, and an ardent campaigner against the health pass, who came down with COVID-19. In a video on his party’s website, Asselineau, who was not hospitalized, called on people to denounce the “absurd, unjust and totally liberty-killing” health pass.

A protester uses a face covering to protect against tear gas as police move their line during a demonstration in Paris on Saturday. (Adrienne Surprenant/The Associated Press)

French authorities are implementing the health pass because the highly contagious delta variant is making strong inroads. More than 24,000 new daily cases were confirmed Friday night — compared with just a few thousand cases a day at the start of the month.

The government announcement that the health pass would take effect on Aug. 9 has driven many unvaccinated French to sign up for inoculations so their social lives won’t get shut down during the summer holiday season. Vaccinations are now available at a wide variety of places, including some beaches. More than 52 per cent of the French population has been vaccinated.

About 112,000 people have died of the virus in France since the start of the pandemic.


What’s happening in Canada

Workers prepare COVID-19 vaccine shots at a mobile clinic in Montreal on Saturday. (Jean-Claude Taliana/Radio-Canada)

  • COVID-19 modelling group sounds alarm over Alberta’s case trajectory.
  • The end of an order: A timeline from N.B.’s first COVID case to life in green.

What’s happening around the world

As of Saturday, more than 197.6 million cases of COVID-19 had been reported worldwide, according to Johns Hopkins University. More than 4.2 million deaths had been reported.

People wearing face masks board a train in Tokyo on Saturday. (Kantaro Komiya/The Associated Press)

In Asia, the number of COVID-19 cases reported in Tokyo reached a daily record 4,058 at the mid-point of the Olympics, according to city hall on Saturday.

In Africa, health officials say cases have risen sharply in Senegal, Ghana, Nigeria and elsewhere in the continent’s West amid low vaccination rates and delta variant spread.

In the Americas, the U.S. state of Florida reported 21,683 new cases of COVID-19 on Saturday, the state’s highest one-day total since the start of the pandemic, according to federal health data.

Adblock test (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

News

Window narrowing for Canada to hit COVID-19 vaccination targets needed to avoid worst of fourth wave – The Globe and Mail

Published

 on


Chief Public Health Officer Dr. Theresa Tam provides an update on the COVID-19 pandemic during a press conference in Ottawa, November 2020.

Sean Kilpatrick/The Canadian Press

Canada is in a race against the clock to vaccinate enough people to avoid the worst-case scenarios of a fourth wave of the coronavirus pandemic, driven by the highly contagious Delta variant.

Chief Public Health Officer Theresa Tam and her deputy Howard Njoo presented the monthly modelling update at a news conference on Friday, showing an uptick in COVID-19 cases. They outlined the potential for numbers to surge in the next month past those seen in the last wave of the pandemic, even if vaccinations increase. However, they said the increase may not lead to a comparable surge in hospitalizations and deaths.

“I think we are in a slightly precarious period at the moment in between these people trying to get the vaccines in and reopening,” Dr. Tam said.

The five-week countdown to Labour Day is the key focus for the government’s vaccination push, she said. The modelling from the Public Health Agency of Canada says more than 80 per cent of eligible people need to be fully vaccinated to avoid overwhelming hospitals in the case of a fourth wave. According to COVID-19 Tracker Canada, 81 per cent of eligible Canadians have received their first shot and 66 per cent are fully vaccinated. Health Canada has approved vaccines for people 12 and over.

Experts warn of a resurgence in COVID-19 cases as New Brunswick prepares to lift nearly all restrictions

The unofficial end of summer in Canada is also when colder weather and a return to classrooms will start driving more people inside. “This time is crucial for building up protection before we gather in schools, colleges, university and workplaces,” she said.

Some infectious disease specialists have said Canada should aim for at least a 90 per cent vaccination rate for eligible people in order to limit the impact of the fourth wave. Dr. Tam said her agency put the focus on protecting hospitals, but added vaccination shouldn’t stop at 80 per cent coverage.

“If we can get to 90, I’ll be popping open the champagne,” Dr. Tam said.

Getting to that level is no easy task and will require much more targeted outreach, said Noni MacDonald, a professor of pediatric infectious diseases at Dalhousie University and Halifax’s IWK Health Centre. Dr. MacDonald, who researches vaccine safety and hesitancy, said Canada has come close to but never fully hit the targets for other vaccines, but noted the context for COVID-19 is different because of how front-and-centre the disease is in daily life.

About 5 per cent of adults are hardliners who won’t get the vaccine, Dr. MacDonald said, but there is a “movable middle” group of people – including those looking for more information and others who face barriers owing to a disability, lack of trust in the the system, geographic challenges, irregular work schedules and even needle phobias. All those issues can be addressed, she said, pointing to B.C.’s effort to send mobile vaccination clinics to where people already are – namely beaches and summer camps.

“Barriers of access is a big deal … you’ve got to actively think about those barriers, and how as a health care program you can overcome them,” Dr. MacDonald said.

To reach higher vaccination levels, peer groups and neighbours can also play an important role in normalizing vaccinations and helping others access the shot, she added.

The Friday modelling also showed that even with 85 per cent full vaccination coverage, cases could surge to about 7,500 a day by the start of September if individual contacts increase by 25 per cent. If the number of people we come in contact with stays unchanged, the modelling predicts about 1,300 daily new cases by September. The trajectory will depend on how high Canada can push its vaccination coverage and “the timing, pace and extent of reopening,” Dr. Tam said.

Of the provinces, Alberta is taking the most aggressive approach to reopening, already ending the majority of its COVID-19 health measures and no longer requiring masks indoors. It will soon lift the self-isolation mandate and stop widespread testing and contact tracing. On Friday, Ontario said once it has met its remaining vaccination targets, it will end the vast majority of public-health measures, including capacity limits at events. However, it will still require masks indoors.

When asked about Alberta’s decision, Dr. Tam said she firmly believes in isolating cases and that the province’s decision puts more onus on individuals.

In June, the public-health agency’s modelling said Canada needed to hit 83 per cent full vaccination coverage to avoid overwhelming hospitals. On Friday, Dr. Tam didn’t explain why that figure was removed from the latest update. She said it was a “very granular number,” but added she does expect that Canada’s vaccination coverage will pass 83 per cent.

Younger people have had less time to book vaccine appointments than older populations who are more vulnerable to COVID-19 and were prioritized earlier in provincial and territorial vaccination campaigns. The Friday modelling underscored the need for many more 18-to-39-year-olds to get their jabs to protect hospitals in the next wave of the pandemic.

If only 72 per cent of that age group are fully vaccinated, then hospitals could again be overwhelmed. According to the models, that risk is greatly reduced if full vaccination coverage in that age group hits 80 per cent.

Know what is happening in the halls of power with the day’s top political headlines and commentary as selected by Globe editors (subscribers only). Sign up today.

Adblock test (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Trending