Connect with us

Politics

Humorless politics a sad sign of our times | TheHill – The Hill

Published

 on


Where has all the humor gone in American politics? Sure, that may sound like a column for the dog days of late August, but I think our current humorlessness actually says quite a bit about the state of American politics.

It wasn’t too long ago that Bob Dole, Morris K. Udall, Alan Simpson, Bob Strauss and Ted Kennedy brought a welcome levity to politics, as did presidents John F. Kennedy and Ronald Reagan.

Humor can offer a respite.

“Gentlemen why do you not laugh?” Abraham Lincoln asked his cabinet during the Civil War. “With the fearful strain that is upon me day and night if I did not laugh, I should die.” He was the model; when accused of being two faced, Lincoln responded, “If I had two faces would I be wearing this one?” 

Politics today are downright dour. 

Mark Shields, who as a columnist, commentator and earlier a political strategist was unsurpassed for his keen humor as well as political insights, offers an explanation: “Contemporary politicians lack the sense of self or the self-confidence to use humor. Every issue is of gravity, and any use of humor might suggest not taking the issue being discussed seriously enough.”

The upshot, he says, is “our politics is more grim as a result of the absence of humor, less interesting, and our politicians are a lot more self-serious, even self-important.”

Dick Flavin is a legendary Boston humorist and former television commentator who has written speeches for prominent Democrats like Ted Kennedy. He traces much of this overbearing seriousness to Newt GingrichNewton (Newt) Leroy GingrichMORE, the former Republican Speaker of the House: “He rose to prominence by preaching that politics is war and that the other side should be treated as enemies, to be destroyed at all costs. The loss of our sense of humor is collateral damage.”

Self-deprecating humor used to be an effective tool. “If you can make fun of yourself, it says ‘I’m just like you,’” notes former Republican humor speech writer, Landon Parvin.

Eric Schnure, a Washington-based consultant who has written many humor speeches, mainly for Democratic politicians but also a few Republicans, agrees: “The goal no longer is to define yourself as witty and appeal to all while scoring a point. It’s now solely to score the point.”

A reprise, familiar mainly to us old-timers is revealing; try to imagine any of this from today’s politicians.

Self-deprecation was a staple of the Kennedys. I remember covering Ted Kennedy in the1970s when he was campaigning for Jay RockefellerJohn (Jay) Davison RockefellerBottom Line World Health Day: It’s time to fight preventable disease Lobbying World MORE in West Virginia. The brother of the former president said he was shocked that a young man — Rockefeller — would run for high office trading on a famous name.

Before the 1960 presidential primaries, Joseph Kennedy’s willingness to spend big money on his son’s race was controversial. At one Gridiron dinner, JFK read a telegram supposedly from his father: “Don’t buy one more vote than necessary. I’ll be damned if I’m going to pay for a landslide.”

When criticized for soaring deficits, Regan replied, “I am not worried about the deficit. It is big enough to take care of itself.”

Making light of your own party was a winner. Bob Dole once quipped that “Only a Republican would think that the best part of Viagra is the fact that you could make money off it.” Arizona’s Morris Udall, a Democrat, said he wanted to be buried in Chicago — so he could “remain active in politics.”

One of my favorite moments in years of interminable Washington press dinners was sitting next to Udall, a liberal Democrat, as he marveled at the timing of conservative Republican Alan Simpson.

The Wyoming Republican once noted that in “your country club, your church and business, about 15 percent of the people are screwballs, lightweights and boobs. You would not want those people unrepresented in Congress.”

My favorite story is the one Udall used to tell about the politician who was visiting an Indian reservation right before an election. If they voted for him, he promised a new hospital for the reservation: “Goomwah, Goomwah,” the tribe responded. Udall said the politician then added if they voted for him, they’d get a new school: “Goomwah, Goomwah” was the enthusiastic reply. As the self-satisfied politician was leaving by the horse corral, Udall said, the tribal chief cautioned him to be careful not to step in the goomwah.

Al Hunt is the former executive editor of Bloomberg News. He previously served as reporter, bureau chief and Washington editor for the Wall Street Journal. For almost a quarter century he wrote a column on politics for The Wall Street Journal, then The International New York Times and Bloomberg View. He hosts Politics War Room with James Carville. Follow him on Twitter @AlHuntDC.

Adblock test (Why?)



Source link

Politics

Politics Briefing: Annamie Paul exits as leader of the Green Party of Canada – The Globe and Mail

Published

 on


Hello,

This is the daily Politics Briefing newsletter, written by Ian Bailey. It is available exclusively to our digital subscribers. If you’re reading this on the web, subscribers can sign up for the Politics newsletter and more than 20 others on our newsletter signup page. Have any feedback? Let us know what you think.

Annamie Paul has announced her departure as leader of the Green Party of Canada, calling the experience of being at the helm of the party the worst one of her life.

Ms. Paul’s exit comes after a challenging election for the Greens. She placed fourth in the Toronto Centre riding she ran in and, nationally, the party saw their share of the popular vote fall from 6.55 per cent in 2019 to 2.3 per cent.

Although they won a seat in Ontario – Mike Morrice was the victor in Kitchener Centre – they lost the Vancouver Island riding of Nanaimo-Ladysmith, one of two seats they held at dissolution.

Ms. Paul said she was not up to trying to keep her leadership role by securing at least 60 per cent support in a leadership review to be held within six months.

“I just don’t have the heart for it,” she said, citing conflict within the party – particularly with the federal council that governs it.

She noted that there were insufficient resources to compete in the campaign, including the absence of a national campaign manager, and that she realized the campaign would be a challenge.

Ms. Paul said she knew the Greens would likely not do well, and she would take the blame, but she decided to proceed because of candidates who had committed to run for the party, and the need to show that “someone like me could get as far as I could.” She is the first Jewish woman and Black person elected leader of a federal party.

“When I was elected, put in this role, I was breaking a glass ceiling. What I didn’t realize at the time is I was breaking a glass ceiling that was going to fall on my head and leave a lot of shards of glass that I was going to have to crawl over throughout my time as leader,” she said.

“For those Green Party members who have taken great pleasure in attacking me and calling for assaults against me and calling for organization against me and suggesting I am part of a conspiracy against the party, you may take small comfort but please know there are many more people like me than you and you will not succeed in the end.”

Without elaborating, Ms. Paul warned members of a continuing struggle for the soul of the party.

And she said she would look for other ways to serve and pursue her interest in public policy, “This was always about service and I have been outside of politics for most of my life so I know there are other ways to serve.”

Overall, she said, “It has been the worst period of my life in many respects.”

She then left without taking media questions.

Ms. Paul, a lawyer, was elected Green Party leader in October, 2020, succeeding interim leader Jo-Ann Roberts and Elizabeth May, the party’s leader from 2006 to 2019.

Fundraising challenges meant that while other party leaders travelled widely in Canada in search of votes, Ms. Paul rarely left Toronto Centre.

The limited campaign effort followed months of conflict between Ms. Paul and members of the party’s governing federal council, which sought at times to oust her.

Also, the Greens only nominated candidates in 252 ridings, not all 338.

Before the election, the Greens lost their only seat outside British Columbia. Jenica Atwin, who won the riding of Fredericton in 2019, defected to the Liberals in June. She held on to the seat in last week’s election.

TODAY’S HEADLINES

THE TWO MICHAELS

WHAT NEXT? -The emotional return of Michael Kovrig and Michael Spavor to home soil after nearly three years of arbitrary detention was warmly embraced by Canadians this weekend, but their ordeal will have long-lasting implications on this country’s relationship with China.

CHINA’S CLAIMS ON THE RETURN OF THE TWO MICHAELS – Two Canadians detained in late 2019 who were allowed to return to Canada in a prisoner swap were released on bail for health reasons, China’s Foreign Ministry said Monday.

HUAWEI AND 5G – A long-delayed decision facing the federal government about whether to ban Huawei Technologies Co. Ltd. from the build-out of Canada’s 5G wireless networks is back in the spotlight after the return of Michael Spavor and Michael Kovrig.

CHINESE STATE MEDIA ON CANADA-CHINA RELATIONSHIP – The release of Huawei chief financial officer Meng Wanzhou is an opportunity for a reboot of bilateral relations with the United States and Canada but “toxic political rhetoric” could still “poison” the atmosphere,” Chinese state media said on Monday.

MICHAEL KOVRIG, IN HIS OWN WORDS – “I’m running on about two hours of sleep in the last 24 hours so I don’t have any exciting plans just yet,” Michael Kovrig, speaking, on Sunday to Global News’ The West Block in a brief interview available here.

MEANWHILE

KENNEY SPEAKS OUT – Premier Jason Kenney rejected calls for a “hard lockdown” during an appearance on a radio program Sunday, the same day his province’s former top doctor signed a letter calling for immediate “fire break” measures to deal with surging cases of COVID-19.

THE NEXT LIBERAL LEADER? – Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s job as Liberal Party leader seems secure, but The National Post is ranking possible successors in case Mr. Trudeau exits. Ranking begins here.

NEW JOB FOR BAINS – CIBC has hired former Liberal cabinet minister Navdeep Bains as vice-chair, global investment banking. Mr. Bains stepped down as innovation minister in January and did not run in the recent federal election. Story here.

THE CASE FOR A FEMALE DEFENCE MINISTER – Canada’s only female defence minister was in 1993. Is it time for another? The Canadian Press assesses the issue here.

KEEP O’TOOLE AS TORY LEADER: BRAD WALL – “I don’t think the Conservatives should be changing their leader right now, but they really need to reach out and say, `We had a strong platform from Western Canada’ and maybe they ought to stop trying to win in Quebec because it just ain’t happening no matter what they do. That embarrassing bow to Bill 21 or endorsements from [Quebec Premie François] Legault didn’t help. Maybe it’s time to fashion a new strategy.” – Mr. Wall, the former Saskatchewan premier, on The Roy Green show – available here – over the weekend. Mr. Wall also talks about country music singer Colter Wall – his son.

THE MODERATOR OF THE ENGLISH-LANGUAGE LEADERS’ DEBATE SPEAKS OUT ON `THE QUESTION.’

Shachi Kurl (president of the Angus Reid Institute, and moderator of the 2021 English-language leaders’ debate) on the debate question, during the leaders’ debate, that caused a storm in Quebec: “So here was the question: “You deny that Quebec has problems with racism. Yet you defend legislation such as Bills 96 and 21, which marginalize religious minorities, anglophones, and allophones. For those outside the province, please help them understand why your party also supports these discriminatory laws.” To those asking me to take it all back: I stand by the question. Unequivocally. I stand by it because the question gave Mr. Blanchet the opportunity to talk to people outside Quebec, about secularism, about laïcité. He could have shared the Quebec perspective with the rest of Canada. He chose not to.”

PRIME MINISTER’S DAY

“Private meetings,” according to an advisory from the Prime Minister’s Office.

LEADERS

Bloc Quebecois Leader Yves François Blanchet addresses members of caucus during a meeting in Shawinigan, and takes media questions.

Green Party Leader Annamie Paul, in Toronto, announced her resignation as leader of the party, but did not take media questions.

No schedules released for other party leaders.

OPINION

The Editorial Board of The Globe and Mail on the Conservative need for big-city seats:Canada is mostly urban and suburban, and becoming more so every day. In fact, the map of Parliament will be redrawn over the next couple of years, in light of the 2021 census. Since the last census, Metro Vancouver gained more than 400,000 people. Calgary gained more than 300,000, Ottawa a quarter-million, Montreal more than half a million, and the GTA roughly one million people. All those places will be getting more seats before the next election. That’s the Conservative Party’s future.”

Campbell Clark (The Globe and Mail) on the hard lesson of the the situation with the two Michaels:Politically and economically, a lot of damage has been done to Canada-China relations. Now there will be a rush to try to undo that damage, particularly in the business community. But not so fast. There remains an unavoidable need to work with China in some areas, but Beijing’s long-standing call of “win-win” relations has to be distrusted more now, because when push comes to shove, China reserves the right to decide what is a win for each party. We know that because push did come to shove.”

Ann Dickie, Sanjay Ruparelia (Policy Options) on the need for additional research into why the expansion of special voting arrangements didn’t stop a worrisome decline in turnout in recent provincial elections: “Many democracies have confronted a key challenge since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic in early 2020: how to balance public safety and electoral participation. However, many of the changes introduced to meet this imperative were already in existence, at least in part, before the pandemic arrived, and their ramifications will extend beyond our current election cycle. As the world becomes more digitally oriented, electoral modernization via special voting arrangements (SVAs) – from early and postal voting to proxy voting – is vital for all countries and constituencies seeking to combat apathy, disaffection and exclusion.”

Send along your political questions and we will look at getting answers to run in this newsletter. It’s not possible to answer each one personally. Questions and answers will be edited for length and clarity.

Got a news tip that you’d like us to look into? E-mail us at tips@globeandmail.com. Need to share documents securely? Reach out via SecureDrop

Adblock test (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Politics

Letter: Playing politics with the virus – Cowichan Valley Citizen

Published

 on


Playing politics with the virus

Have always been of the opinion that politicians worldwide chose to play politics with the COVID-19 virus instead of stopping it from spreading by closing their respective international borders. Either they learned nothing from the Spanish flu pandemic which spread worldwide via the soldiers returning from the First World War or they chose to ignore it?

It appears that these viruses have a definitive life cycle. The Spanish flu faded into oblivion after the forth wave. The P.H.O for B.C informed us that all pandemics have four waves. So if they knew how the COVID-19 virus would react, how many waves there would be etc. why did they not take steps to prevent it from arriving in Canada? Politics, is my opinion. How many elections have we had in Canada, called by political parties whose only ambition is extending their power base and time in office?

My cynicism and distrust of the motives for the handling of this virus were confirmed while reading the following.

Dame Sarah Gilbert, the lead scientist from Oxford University, and the brain behind the vaccine manufactured in India as Covishield, stated the following: “The virus cannot completely mutate because its spike protein has to interact with the ACE2 receptor on the surface of the human cell, in order to get inside it. If it changes its spike protein so much that it can’t interact with that receptor, then it’s not going to be able to get inside the cell. So, there aren’t many places for the virus to go to have something that will evade immunity but still remain infectious.”

Dr. Gilbert is reported as saying that the virus that causes COVID-19 will eventually become like the coronaviruses which circulate widely and cause the common cold.

She also stated, “What tends to happen over time is there’s just a slow drift, that’s what happens with flu viruses. You see small changes accumulating over a period of time and then we have the opportunity to react to that.”

“It has been pretty quiet since Delta emerged and it would be nice to think there won’t be any new variants of concern. If I was pushed to predict, I think there will be new variants emerging over time and I think there is still quite a lot of road to travel down with this virus,” she said.

So thanks to our political masters, we are going to have this virus around for some time. Wonder if they think the cost in financial and human terms was/is worth it?

Ian Kimm

Duncan

Letters

Adblock test (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Politics

Green Party chief Annamie Paul resigns, calling it ‘worst period’ of her life

Published

 on

Annamie Paul announced her resignation as head of Canada‘s Green Party on Monday after losing in her own district in last week’s parliamentary election, stepping aside just under a year after becoming the nation’s first Black leader of a mainstream national party.

Paul, 48, said she felt she was never truly allowed to lead the fractious environmentally focused party and was not interested in going through a fight to remain its chief. She called her time as party leader “the worst period in my life.”

“When I was elected and put in this role, I was breaking a glass ceiling,” Paul told reporters in Toronto. “What I didn’t realize at the time is that I was breaking a glass ceiling that was going to fall on my head.”

Paul came in fourth in her own Toronto constituency – won by the Liberals – and the Greens dropped 4 percentage points nationally in the Sept. 20 election compared with 2019. They won only two seats in the 338-seat House of Commons compared with three two years ago.

Liberal Prime Minister Justin Trudeau won a third term, albeit with a minority of seats in parliament.

Paul, a Toronto lawyer, beat out seven other contenders to win the leadership of the party last October. But she has for months been in a battle with the party’s federal council, which tried to oust her before the election. The party did not provide funding for Paul to hire a campaign staff or a national campaign manager.

“I just don’t have the heart for it,” Paul said, referring to going through a leadership review invoked by the party immediately after the election.

Of the discord within the party, Paul said she had never been given the opportunity to lead and “I will not be given that opportunity.”

Jenica Atwin, one of the three Green parliamentarians, left the party in June and joined the Liberals. Atwin was elected as a Liberal last week.

Atwin has said her exit was in large part due to a dispute over the party’s stance on Israel. Paul is Jewish. Atwin on Twitter criticized Israel’s treatment of Palestinians. A senior adviser to Paul, Noah Zatzman, posted on Facebook that some unspecified Green members of parliament were anti-Semitic.

The Greens had appeared to be well-positioned going into this year’s election, as most Canadians indicated that fighting climate change was one of their priority issues. But Liberals and the left-leaning New Democrats promoted their own climate plans and capitalized on the sense of chaos within the party.

Paul said during the campaign that she had thought several times about quitting, but wanted to stay and fight for important causes. Paul was the second person of color to head a federal party in Canada after Jagmeet Singh took over the left-leaning New Democrats in 2017.

 

(Reporting by Steve Scherer; Editing by Will Dunham)

Continue Reading

Trending