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Hundreds of original works of art for sale at Maple Ridge show

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Watercolour artist Christopher Potter loves the challenge of capturing the outdoors – whether it be the play of light on water, a stormy sky, sun dappling through the forest canopy of the flash of a colourful bird.

A stark contrast to his surroundings growing up. Born in 1943, just outside London, England, during the Second World War, the artist said he spent his youth playing amid the devastation of bomb sites.

It was these images that gave Potter, an active member of the Garibaldi Art Club and also the Canadian Federation of Artists, an appreciation of the beauty of the British rural countryside, and a true appreciation of nature, which can be seen in his paintings that will be a part of the upcoming Garibaldi Art Club’s annual Fall Show and Sale.

Hundreds of pieces will be available for purchase at the non-juried show – featuring 41 local artists – in a variety of styles and subjects, painting in a variety of mediums including acrylic, watercolour, oil, pastel, alcohol ink, and more.

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This year there will be a special feature wall featuring 10”x10” pieces that will be specially priced for the show at $150 each. Unframed and matted pieces will be available in addition to art cards.

A raffle will be taking place for two gift baskets at the close of the show on Sunday. The baskets will have a variety of items such as kitchen & food items, art cards, and gift cards. Raffle tickets are $2 each or three for $5.

A cash-only wine bar will be open for opening night.

READ ALSO: Red is the colour of the Garibaldi Art Club’s fall show and sale

ALSO: Scenic scapes featured at Maple Ridge art club’s juried show and sale

Refreshments will be available all weekend including coffee and tea.

There will also be special artist demonstrations. From 11-12:30 p.m. Isabel Gibson will be painting in acrylics and from 2-3:30 p.m. Simone Sullivan will also be doing a demonstration in acrylics. On Sunday, from 11-12:30 p.m. Lyn Thomas will be demonstrating pastels and from 2-3:30 p.m. Jac Prasad will be working in acrylics.

The opening reception takes place from 7-9 p.m. Friday, Nov. 18. The art show continues 10-4 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, Nov. 19-20.

Garibaldi Art Club’s annual Fall Show and Sale takes place at the Albion Community Hall, 24165 104 Avenue, in Maple Ridge.

For more information about the Garibaldi Art Club go to garibaldiartclub.com.

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5 best AI art generators of 2023: DALL-E 2 and alternatives – ZDNet

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5 best AI art generators of 2023: DALL-E 2 and alternatives  ZDNet

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GUEST COLUMN: Local woman discovers the art of healing – OrilliaMatters

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GUEST COLUMN: Local woman discovers the art of healing  OrilliaMatters

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Richmond Art Gallery’s central location makes art easily accessible

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Artist Mike Bourscheid grew up in a “blue-collar family” that he said didn’t have time for museums and art. As his artistic interest grew, the Luxembourg native searched art and museums on his own.

Now Bourscheid is an international artist who is thrilled to have his first solo institutional show displayed at the Richmond Art Gallery (RAG) which sits in the well-frequented, transit friendly Richmond Cultural Centre hub that also includes the Richmond Public LibraryRichmond MuseumThe City of Richmond Archives and the Richmond Art Centre.

“I had to seek art out. It wasn’t easy. Here it is right in front of you. It’s incredible,” said Bourscheid about RAG’s central location by Zoom from Luxembourg recently. “It’s in a community space. It’s pretty cool.”

Bourscheid’s Sunny Side Up and other sorrowful stories along with the video Agnes will be on display Jan. 28 to April 2 at the gallery. Running simultaneously at the gallery is the new Codes of Silence, curated by the RAG’s Zoë Chan.

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“I think when it becomes about the art market often it can become something very elite and something that is hard to understand,” said Bourscheid, who splits his time between Luxembourg and Vancouver as his wife, fellow artist Vanessa Brown, is from Vancouver. “I think art is for everybody. That’s the main thing.

“It’s nice that here people can just walk by and walk in.”

Bourscheid’s new show offers up his signature approach of using handmade costumes, props and crafts to look at and challenge deep-rooted cultural values and relationships.

“I usually say I work in different media,” said Bourscheid. “I work in photography, video, performance, sculpture, drawing and that often it starts with a costume and with my own body then it turns, while doing it, into something. The costume or prop itself decides where it is going.”

 

Sunny Side Up and other sorrowful stories installations feature costumes, props, sculptures and a video by artist Mike Bourscheid. The show runs from Jan. 28 to April 2 at the Richmond Art Gallery.
Sunny Side Up and other sorrowful stories installations feature costumes, props, sculptures and a video by artist Mike Bourscheid. The show runs from Jan. 28 to April 2 at the Richmond Art Gallery. jpg

For the exhibition here, Bourscheid is premiering a new 45-minute, two channel video titled Agnes, which he says is a homage to the hard work of his seamstress single mother. Agnes is her middle name.

“It’s a lot about labour and housework,” said Bourscheid about the 45-minute video accompanied by a recreation of the video’s set complete with the costumes and props from the shoot.

RAG director Shaun Dacey programmed the Bourscheid show and says that for the past few years he has been watching Bourscheid develop, specifically through work with the VAG and Western Front, and was drawn to the “theatricality of his practice.”

“When speaking to Mike I was surprised to find out he had never had a solo exhibition in Vancouver and we wanted to give him the opportunity to play in our space,” said Dacey by email. “With this new project Mike engages familial memory through costume, set-building and video. I am interested in this body of work through his performance of a sort of masculine drag, exaggerating and interrogating this gender performance, as a clown and a cowboy, among other characters.”

The Chan-curated show Codes of Silence features the video artists Haitian/American Shirley Bruno, Aleesa Cohene, a Canadian based in Los Angeles, Caroline Monnet, an Indigenous artist based in Montreal, and American Cauleen Smith.

 

The new show Codes of Silence at the Richmond Art Gallery includes videos from Aleesa Cohene, Caroline Monnet, Cauleen Smith and Shirley Bruno, shown here.
The new show Codes of Silence at the Richmond Art Gallery includes videos from Aleesa Cohene, Caroline Monnet, Cauleen Smith and Shirley Bruno, shown here. jpg

“I think we are accustomed to the voice being a mode of expression. A way of communicating identity. Who we are. But I also wanted to think of ways of communicating that was not so public-facing but kind of delving inward,” said Chan during a phone call. “For example, in Cauleen Smith’s video we see the artist making bouquets. Paying homage basically to someone who has died. So, there is this really ritualistic moment where they are just silently making flowers and we know that this is an act of mourning, but there are no words spoken.

“So maybe it is also kind of saying too that words are not necessarily enough. And inviting the public to consider and focus in on these quieter moments that are more internal and inner-facing and asking the visitors to really listen.”

Chan, who joined the RAG last spring, added that the video presentations will be complimented by art work from the gallery’s own collection.

 

The new video show Codes of Silence marks curator Zoë Chan’s first exhibition for the Richmond Art Gallery since becoming its curator last spring.
The new video show Codes of Silence marks curator Zoë Chan’s first exhibition for the Richmond Art Gallery since becoming its curator last spring. jpg

Chan, like Bourscheid, appreciates the accessibility of the gallery and the deep community roots that have been nurtured with the help of location.

 

“We’re not just getting art aficionados coming to the gallery,” said Chan. “People are stopping by out of curiosity. We are very interested first and foremost in engaging our local communities, but we also hope we are presenting exciting programming that will interest a wide range of people … Any kind of engaged citizen.”

 

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