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Hunter's social media posts prompt outrage, calls for more protection for wolves – Times Colonist

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An Island hunter who has said on social media that she wants to kill an entire pack of wolves has sparked outrage and calls for stricter provincial rules for hunting the apex predator.

Jacine Jadresko recently posted two selfies holding dead wolves on her Instagram account, Inked Huntress, which was made private in the past week.

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In a post, Jadresko says she was made aware of “a problem wolf pack that was snatching people’s cats and dogs.” She said she set traps, and has caught two wolves.

“Full pack removal is always the goal, so now we adjust and reset,” she wrote in the post.

Jadresko has an international reputation as a trophy hunter and was the subject of a 2016 Netflix documentary called The Women Who Kill Lions. In the film, Jadresko says she has killed 29 different species, including an African buffalo and a grizzly bear, in just a year and a half. She has received countless death threats for sharing photos of her kills online.

Wildlife photographer Cheryl Alexander shared screenshots of Jadresko’s photos with the dead wolves on her Facebook page dedicated to Takaya, the lone wolf who lived on ­Discovery Island for years.

The post drew nearly 1,000 comments, many of which expressed outrage.

To Alexander, Jadresko is a symbol of a broader problem — that the province’s regulations for hunting wolves, the only big game that does not require a tag, are too lax.

On Vancouver Island, a hunter is allowed to kill three wolves per year, but there’s no limit on how many wolves a trapper can take, according to the Ministry of Forests, Lands, Natural Resource Operations and Rural Development.

All hunters and trappers who kill a wolf on Vancouver Island must report it to the province, although there are areas of B.C. where that’s not required.

In a statement, the ministry said because wolves are difficult to trap and their pelts are not particularly valuable, the number of animals killed through trapping is typically low.

An average of 18 wolves have been killed on the Island through trapping over the past five years, out of an estimated 250 animals, the ministry said.

But Alexander said there’s not enough known about wolf populations to support the province’s management approach.

“Anyone can decide that wolves are a problem, or just for the heck of it go shoot a wolf — or as many wolves in most areas of the province as they want — without any solid scientific basis for that,” she said.

Alexander is pushing for a moratorium on recreational wolf hunting, as well as compulsory reporting of wolf kills in all areas of the province. She also wants the province to require hunters to buy tags to kill wolves.

The hunter who legally shot and killed Takaya wasn’t out looking for wolves at the time, Alexander said, and if a tag were required, he might not have been able to kill the wolf legally.

“It brings a level of accountability into the process of hunting wolves,” she said.

Most hunters who kill wolves do so to protect declining deer populations, said Jesse Zeman, director of fish and wildlife restoration for the B.C. Wildlife Federation.

But Alexander takes issue with the idea that wolves are at fault for changes to the deer population, pointing to habitat degradation as the culprit.

Katrine Conroy, minister of forests, lands, natural resource operations and rural development, said in a statement that Jadresko is taking advantage of a loophole in hunting regulations to boost her profile.

“We will be working with the B.C. Wildlife Federation and the B.C. Trappers Association to change the regulations to close this loophole so this type of behaviour is prevented in the future,” she said.

Jadresko declined an interview, but said in a message that her recent kills are not trophy or recreational hunting. “We are not trying to hunt an entire pack of wolves in East Sooke,” she wrote.

“The wolves in question have chased and cornered a human and have attacked and killed multiple pets.”

She said she has a trapping licence and permission from the property owners to trap wolves on their property, and that her partner is of Métis heritage, so trapping and using pelts is part of his culture.

She has also reported all trapping activities to conservation officers, she said.

regan-elliott@timescolonist.com

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Sens Sickos: A look at the Sens fans movement on social media – CTV Edmonton

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OTTAWA —
You may have seen a new term trending on social media about the Ottawa Senators called “Sens Sickos.”

It’s an unlikely rallying cry; born not from the Sens’ success, but from their struggles.

Thanks to an unlikely fan, the movement now has a theme song.

James Mellish is a Sens super-fan.  While many locals have embraced the hometown team, Mellish is unique because he lives in St. Louis, Missouri.

“The Senators jersey just really caught my eye. I had nothing else to go on other than aesthetics,” says Mellish.

Mellish became a fan 15 years ago, while playing the “NHL 2004” video game at a sleepover when he was 12.

“I fell in love with hockey that very night,” said Mellish.

When he purchased the game, Mellish said, “And then I was like, I wonder if this team is any good in real life – and yes they were at that time, very much so; and, I’ve been them following them even more closely ever since.”

He’s now more than just a member of the Sens fan base; he created a theme song to the growing social media movement “Sens Sickos.”

“It ended up getting played in the arena, during a game that I fortunately was able to hurry home and be able to watch it live,” said Mellish.

He watched that game with his girlfriend, “and, we were just screaming on the couch when we realized it was me on the speakers.”

The “Sens Sickos” started when fans were hoping for a loss to increase Ottawa’s chances at the first overall pick in the NHL draft lottery last year.

Chris is a Sens fan, who goes by the Twitter handle @brochenski. He modified a political cartoon, and it grew from there.

“It was originally a meme made by the Onion,” Chris tells CTV News Ottawa.

He added a Senators hat and foam finger on the character, and says it then took off.

“It just kind of flows well, and it just fits the overall vibe of how Sens feel,” says Chris, “Sens fans feel kind of beaten down by the last few years.”

“That’s what we’ve come to in Ottawa; we’re at the stage now where the Sens have been losing games on the ice for so long that fans have found a way to amuse themselves,” says TSN 1200’s John Rodenburg.

Rodenburg thinks fans are ready to see the team not just win, but get back to the rink,

“Fans are just so thirsty to one day find a winning team, a team they can cheer on, be back in the rink at some point, experience what it’s like to be a fan again,” said Rodenburg, morning host on TSN 1200.  “But in the meantime, it’s like, what can I do to make this entire experience as fun as I possibly can.”

Mellish is looking forward to visiting Ottawa again and meeting other fans in person once the pandemic is over.   He’s visited Ottawa once, about 11 years ago.

“Definitely excited to do that.”

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Penguins admit they edited masks onto fans for social media post – CBS Sports

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The Pittsburgh Penguins have admitted that someone in their social media department altered a photo to make it look like everyone in it was wearing their mask correctly for a social media post. The team said in a statement to the New York Post that the staffer responsible for the edit has been disciplined.

The post itself, which is still up as of this writing, was made for the return of fans to the team’s arena for the first time since fans were barred from games as part of the league’s COVID-19 prevention policy. It included a quote from the Penguins’ coach about appreciation for the team’s supporters. The original image, however, included three people who didn’t have their masks over their nose and mouth, as DK Pittsburgh Sports reporter Taylor Haase noted.

A group of 2,800 fans was allowed into PPG Paints Arena on Tuesday for the first time since March 8, 2020. This came in response to a ruling from Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Wolf, who permitted gatherings up to 15 percent capacity at indoor venues. The Penguins marked the moment with a 5-2 win. 

As for the edit itself, the Penguins said that while the staffer was “perhaps well-intended” the move was against the organization’s policy. The team also made sure to note that the edits were only made on “a few fans” not following the rules.

“Our social media team should never send out altered photos to our fan base,” the statement continued. “This is a violation of our social media and safety policy, and this staffer has been disciplined.”

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Media group disputes Facebook Canada official's suggestion that exiting news markets an 'appropriate' option – Financial Post

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‘I am not sure why they would want to repeat what they did in Australia,’ News Media Canada President Johm Hinds said

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As Canadian legislation looms to level the playing field between news publishers and big tech platforms, the two sides continue to be divided over what value each brings to the other — even as multi-million-dollar agreements are forged to pay for news content in Europe and Australia. 

On Friday, an association representing publishers across the country took issue with statements made by Facebook Canada’s head of policy in an interview with The Logic, including a suggestion that the presence of news on the social media platform provides a value to publishers equivalent to several hundreds of millions of dollars. 

John Hinds, president of News Media Canada, disputed that figure, and pointed to a report published by his association last year that estimated the value of news content on the platforms at more than $600 million, an amount he said “far outstrips any benefit that publishers derive from the platforms.” 

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During the interview with The Logic, Facebook’s Chan suggested the News Media Canada report last year dealt primarily with the business model — and impact — of other online platforms, not Facebook’s.

Hinds, however, said his view is bolstered by a flurry of multi-million-dollar dollar deals Alphabet Inc.’s Google struck with publishers in Australia last month as the country put the final touches on a mandatory bargaining code governing the relationship between traditional publishers and the tech platforms. 

Google signed multi-year deals with three of Australia’s largest media companies, including Rupert Murdoch’s News Corp., which are reportedly worth tens of millions of dollars to the publishers. 

  1. Facebook said this week it would raise its funding of news publishers to US$1 billion over three years.

    Facebook exploring potential news licensing agreements in Canada: source

  2. Facebook blocked all Australian news content on its service over proposed legislation requiring it and Google to pay fees to Australian publishers for news links.

    Canada vows to be next country to go after Facebook to pay for news

According to Google, each publisher’s deal is different, depending on what they bring to the table, and some of the compensation will come in the form of services “in kind” rather than cash for the publishers. 

Both Google and Facebook objected to Australia’s code, and pushed to be able to negotiate commercial licensing agreements with the publishers of their choice to feed specific news products, rather than being forced to pay for simply carrying news links or snippets. But the spectre of the mandatory code has been credited with pushing forward arrangements that were acceptable to both sides. 

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One of the most visible objections to the legislation was Facebook’s decision to pull Australian news from its platform for several days last month in protest of that country’s mandatory bargaining code. However, just days before the code became law with some minor amendments, Facebook struck its first commercial licensing deal with Australia’s Seven West Media. 

In the interview with the Logic, Chan said such an approach could still be “appropriate” depending on the situation.

“At the end of the day, if it doesn’t work for the platform because the regulation is not workable for them, then exiting the news market is an appropriate response,” he said.

News Media’s Hinds said he was surprised Facebook still views exiting a news market as a viable option.

“I am not sure why they would want to repeat what they did in Australia,” Hinds said.

Canadian Heritage Minister Steven Guilbeault speaks to media in Ottawa.
Canadian Heritage Minister Steven Guilbeault. Photo by Blair Gable/Reuters files

Canada’s heritage minister Steven Guilbeault has pledged to introduce legislation in Canada by June to level the playing field between digital platforms and traditional media players and support the domestic news industry. That plan has won favour with News Media Canada, which said Canadian news publishers and the heritage minister agree legislation is needed “to ensure there are fair negotiations” under a code of conduct. 

“We saw Facebook make threats but finally agree to compensate news publishers in Australia,” the statement said. “That behaviour shows it does not want to pay willingly and will only come to the negotiating table when legislation is passed.” 

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The online platforms have pointed out that publishers willingly share their stories and should simply remove them if they are unhappy they aren’t being compensated. But News Media Canada countered that an “unbalanced power structure” between publishers and the platforms has developed over time. After initially enticing publishers to display their wares, Facebook has now become “such a powerful platform that news publishers have no choice but to use it,” the organization said in Friday’s statement. 

Officials at Facebook declined to comment on the News Media Canada statement. 

Guilbeault has said Canada is studying both the Australian bargaining code and a European response based on copyright. It is understood there will be further consultations with publishers, the tech platforms, and other affected parties and experts before legislation is introduced.

In-depth reporting on the innovation economy from The Logic, brought to you in partnership with the Financial Post.

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