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Imagine High floated as name for new Chilliwack art and tech school – Chilliwack Progress

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Two schools that are joining the Chilliwack education system in the near future now have names.

The names are revealed in the April 28 board of education meeting agenda, and come from months of public input.

The school to be built along the Vedder River, which will serve students in Kindergarten to Grade 8, will have the Indigenous name of Stitó:s Lá:lém Totí:lt. The name was endorsed by local First Nations Chiefs, David Jimmie and Derek Epp.

It is pronounced ‘stee-tahs lah-lem tot-ilt.’

The name was the first choice of the naming committee, second to River’s Edge.

READ MORE: Site prep underway for Chilliwack southside school

The committee report says: “At our first meeting, the Naming Committee expressed a strong desire to select a place-based name, with preference for one with Indigenous significance. The committee was very happy to receive the thorough and thoughtful submission for Stitó:s Lá:lém Totí:lt. This was the unanimous first choice of the committee. Points in its favour included that the name fits well with its location, it is endorsed by Chiefs Epp and Jimmie, and the pronunciation is relatively easy for non-Halq’eméylem speakers.”

The name for the new integrated arts and technology school has also been chosen. It will be called Imagine High, and will be located at AD Rundle middle school and the old UFV site on Yale, following an expansion/upgrade there.

The committee’s decision included this statement:

“Imagine High was the only submission that would mark the new school as a different type of learning institution,” a report says. “It was agreed that it had a catchy sound that could help with marketing, especially if Chilliwack hopes to attract students from other districts in the future. Of note, a long discussion was had about the word “High” and whether or not it should be included. Some committee members expressed that it is a word more associated with American schools (whereas we typically use Secondary). However, in the end, it was agreed that Imagine High sounds good and has the added benefit of being a play on words (the name for a place of learning and also a sentence encouraging students to stretch their imaginations).”

The secondary choice for that school’s name was Midtown, the moniker for the community that was recently created on the majority of the former UFV site.

These names will be discussed at the April 28 Board of Education meeting, which will be conducted through Zoom but also will include participation opportunities for members of the public who pre-register.

To do so, visit www.sd33.bc.ca.

READ MORE: Chilliwack school board plans for an integrated arts school for grades 8-12 at old UFV location


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Levi Nelson art on display in downtown Pemberton – Pique Newsmagazine

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Hydro boxes in Pemberton just got a lot more exciting.

Pieces by Levi Nelson, a Lil’wat Nation artist in his last year at Emily Carr University of Art and Design, are now installed on hydro boxes along Portage Road and on the utility box at the Downtown Community Barn.

“We are incredibly grateful and honoured that Levi shared his artwork with us,” the Village of Pemberton said on a Facebook post on Friday, June 5.

Nelson’s work has been exhibited at the Talking Stick Festival, the Museum of Anthropology, North Vancouver City Art Scape, and the Emily Carr University of Art & Design Aboriginal Student Art Show. He also recently became the first Lil’wat Nation artist to have a piece in the Audain Art Museum’s permanent collection.

The recent hydro box wraps were made possible thanks to a contribution from BC Hydro’s beautification fund.

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Applications being accepted for public art funding – paNOW

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Macleod Campbell explained they are also happy to support public art projects as they help to improve the overall quality of life for people in the city.

“It’s nice to have public art for viewing at this time as well as of course supporting the artist,” she said.

Eligible groups can include a range of organizations from local art groups to private businesses. In order to be eligible, the group has to be working with a professional artist and the piece must be displayed publicly.

There is not a hard deadline for people to apply for funding. Macleod Campbell said applications are subject to approval from the art working committee and city council.

Macleod Campbell explained the city is also working to make people aware of the art which is on display in public spaces around the city, as they have created a public art tour brochure. The document is currently available on the city website and they are looking to get physical copies out into the public.

“That’ll be something as well,” said Macleod Campbell.

MichaelJoel.Hansen@jpbg.ca

On Twitter: @mjhskcdn

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Edmonton teen shares love of art with neighbourhood – Global News

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Paige Reid is brightening up her Edmonton neighbourhood, one driveway at a time.

The 15-year-old budding artist said chalk art was an easy way to spend less time cooped up in the house.

“It was a way to be outside and still do something I would have done inside anyway. I just wanted to have fun with a new kind of medium,” said Paige.


READ MORE:
Edmontonians bring a classic board game Monopoly to life

Before long, her work captured the attention of most of her neighbours in Riverbend.

“I’ve had a lot of kids run up to me and say, ‘Whoa, whoa whoa!’ They’ve been very amazed that I’ve done characters that they recognize.”

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Paige soon began to venture out from beyond her own driveway.

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“Paige offered to draw a cat on our porch,” said neighbour Shauna Scott. “Every single time someone comes to our door people stop and say, ‘Wow, who did this?’ It gives us a big kick when we open the door.”


Paige Reid working on her chalk art on June 4, 2020.


Jessica Robb/Global News

The young artist said she doesn’t charge for her drawings, but if someone offers compensation—she’ll use it to buy more chalk.

“People say you can’t put a price on happiness so I don’t want to do that. It’s fun for me. I don’t need a reward for doing something I already want to do,” she said.

Paige’s mom, Cori Reid, said it’s no surprise her daughter spends her day bringing joy to others.

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“She’s got a good heart. She’s very kind,” said Reid. “She thinks about other people all the time.”

This neighbourhood Picasso is also helping fill time during long summer days.

“[Because of COVID-19] there’s not a lot for kids to do right now, except for being stuck on the computer and be stuck with school on Zoom, dance class on Zoom. It’s nice to get out and feel productive,” said Reid.

While at the same time, bringing a neighbours a smile, one character at a time.

“I’m very happy I’ve achieved my goal of making other people happy.”

© 2020 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

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