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ImagineNATIVE film and media arts festival pivots to online presentations due to pandemic – CBC.ca

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The ImagineNATIVE Indigenous film and media arts festival is going online this year because of the COVID-19 pandemic but there’s still lots to look forward to starting Tuesday, says the festival’s artistic director.

“Film is really great in that it is quite adaptable, so we have a really great on-demand platform for everyone,” said Niki Little. 

Works will be released every day of the six-day festival and will be accessible for 48 hours. The festival will still feature micro meetings, keynote panels and an online hub for the iNDigital space showcasing 17 Indigenous-made digital and interactive media works.

“ImagineNATIVE is usually the place where people come together to connect to talk about their work and to really just celebrate each other,” said Little. 

A still from Audrey’s Story, which will be featured during the opening night shorts program. (ImagineNATIVE)

She said the gathering part was missing because of going online, so in order to honour the community and everyone that comes together to make the festival happen this year, there will be over $20,000 worth of prizes given away. 

There is also over $50,000 in cash awards for the artists. 

“It’s quite incredible how people have come together and rallied around this idea about the giveaway and about honouring our community and honouring the artists, because that’s really what it’s all about,” said Little. 

ImagineNATIVE began by creating space for Indigenous content creators and has expanded to being a nearly week-long festival. Last year it became an Oscar qualifying festival for the short format live action category.

“At the end of the day, we’re all about it being artist-centred and Indigenous-led and ensuring that Indigenous stories are being told by Indigenous people because that’s paramount,” said Little.

There will be four short film programs, each named after one of the colours in the medicine wheel.

The yellow shorts program will open the online festival, featuring works by artists from seven different nations across the world including: Theola Ross, Jack Steele, Ngariki Ngatae, Banchi Hanuse, Michelle Derosier, Hinaleimoana Wong-Kalu and Alisi Telengut.

The red, black and yellow programs will all feature a question and answer component running Wednesday, Friday and Saturday.

Special events include an hour of visual art, performances and curator talks from Toronto galleries in the form of a virtual art crawl led by Little. 

Lorne Cardinal will be presented with the 6th annual August Schellenberg Award of Excellence on Sunday. (ImagineNATIVE)

On Friday, the Night of Indigenous Devs will showcase international Indigenous video game talent. On Saturday, ImagineNATIVE’s annual concert will stream online in partnership with the Tkaronto Music Festival.

On Sunday, actor, producer, and director Lorne Cardinal will be presented with the August Schellenberg Award of Excellence.

Five film picks

Shadow of Dumont

Directed by Métis writer and director Trevor Cameron, this documentary explores Cameron’s cross-country road trip to the homelands of Gabriel Dumont. Dumont played a key role as a leader in the 1885 Métis uprising. 

Monkey Beach

In this adaptation of Eden Robinson’s novel by the same name, Lisa Hill is brought back to her Haisla village of Kitamaat by her dead cousin’s plea. Once she returns she has a vision of her younger brother Jimmy drowning. Jimmy goes out to sea to rid the village of a predator but then goes missing. This sets Lisa off on a journey to save her brother’s soul. This dramatic feature is directed by Cree/Métis writer, director and producer Loretta Todd. 

The Legend of Baron To’a

This film marks Māori/Pasifika actor, writer and producer Kiel McNaighton’s debut as a feature film director. The Legend of Baron To’a tells the story of Fritz, a Tongan entrepreneur, who after several years returns to his old neighbourhood to sell his family’s home, still grappling with his wrestling superstar father Baron To’a’s legacy.

Love and Fury

Seminole and Muscogee Creek filmmaker Sterlin Harjo followed a set of Indigenous artists over the course of the year to explore the question, “who classifies Native American art and what does that mean?” The documentary profiles musician and composer Laura Ortman, who performed at the 2019 Whitney Biennial; artist and composer Raven Chacon; famed poet, musician and author Joy Harjo; singer and guitarist Micah P. Hinson; among others. 

Tell Me A Story: A Multi-Generational Film Program

This program asks families to share stories both old and new. Directors include Phyllis Grant, Darryl Nepinak, Amber Twoyoungmen, Kes Lefthand, Winona Bearshield, Christiana Latham, Tristan Craig, Dustinn Craig, Darlene Naponse and Amanda Strong.

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Julie Courtemanche gets a bigger gig at V7 Media – Media In Canada

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Julie Courtemanche gets a bigger gig at V7 Media

The new position supports CEO Joseph Leon’s strategic objectives, including M&A opportunities.

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The new position supports CEO Joseph Leon’s strategic objectives, including M&A opportunities.

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Session 1 of Media and Journalism track of 3rd Virtual Global WHO Infodemic Conference – World Health Organization

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World Health Organization (WHO) and BBC Media Action and Internews,are pleased to invite you to participate in the media and journalism track of the 3rd Virtual Global WHO Infodemic Conference entitled “Whole-of-Society
Challenges and Solutions to Respond to Infodemics.” The WHO defines an Infodemic as “an overabundance of information – some accurate and some not – occurring during an epidemic, making it hard for people to find trustworthy
sources and reliable guidance when it is most needed.

The objective of the conference is to bring together all segments of society to find a truly multi-sectorial approach to managing Infodemics.  Your media and journalism experience is needed to help ‘repair’ and ‘prepare’ the
media’s response to the Infodemic. No matter your role in the media industry, your opinion can help shape the future of journalism during the next pandemic.

Session descriptions

Topic: The Challenge: Infodemics & the Media – learning from the past
Date: 2 December 2020 14:00 – 16:00 CET
Your participation in this session will help identify challenges and lessons learned
from the 2020 Infodemic.
 
Part 1 (14:00 – 15:00 CET) is a roundtable discussion between global leaders in media and journalism.

  • Hussein Al Sharif, Maharat Foundation (Lebanon)
  • Imogen Foulkes, Geneva Correspondent, BBC (Switzerland)
  • Asha Mwilu, Founder and editor at large at Debunk Media (Kenya)
  • Palagummi Sainath, People’s Archive of Rural India (India)
  • Moderator: Ida Jooste, Internews

Part 2 (15:00 – 16:00 CET) will include invitation only “Repair Cafe” breakout sessions. Participants (you) will be randomly chosen to participate through separate calendar invites.

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Cavani apologizes for social media post, says opposes racism – Yahoo Canada Sports

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The Canadian Press

Veteran Canadian centre back David Edgar to retire at end of the year

Veteran defender David Edgar, who became a Newcastle United favourite with a highlight-reel goal as a teenager and went on to captain Canada, has announced his retirement effective the end of the year.The 33-year-old from Kitchener, Ont., is currently with Canadian Premier League champion Forge FC in the Dominican Republic for Tuesday’s Scotiabank CONCACAF League quarterfinal against Haiti’s Arcahaie FC in Santo Domingo.A Forge win Tuesday would mark Edgar’s swansong. Should the team lose, he could play in one final game — a play-in match later in December to gain entry into the 2021 CONCACAF Champions League.The six-foot-three centre back won 42 caps for Canada, making his senior debut in February 2011 against Greece, and captained his county five times. His last appearance was in a friendly against New Zealand in Spain in March 2018.At the club level, Edgar left Canada at 14 to join Newcastle’s academy. The seventh Canadian to feature in the Premier League, he made his debut in England’s top tier on Dec. 26, 2006, against Bolton. He turned heads for the senior side at the age of 19 with a long-range rocket in a 2-2 tie with Manchester United on Jan. 1, 2007.Edgar went on to make more than 100 appearances for Burnley, also playing for Birmingham City in England with loan spells at Swansea, Huddersfield Town and Sheffield United. He returned to North America in 2016 to play for the Vancouver Whitecaps, Nashville SC and Ottawa Fury.While with the Whitecaps, he underwent surgery In January 2017 to repair the posterior cruciate and medial collateral ligaments as well as the meniscus in his right knee after being hit by a car on holiday in Scottsdale, Ariz., in December 2016. After a short stint with England’s Hartlepool, he signed on with Forge in August 2019, helping the Hamilton side to back-to-back CPL titles.Canada coach John Herdman, who worked with Edgar in his first camp in charge of the, Canadian men, called Edgar “a real leader of men.”“What stood out was his selflessness and willingness to support those young players coming through the system, but at the same time to give everything he had on and off the field to be ready to compete for his country,” he added.Costa Smyrniotis, Forge’s director of football, called Edgar “a true professional who has brought valuable leadership qualities to our young group at the club.””He has played an important role in our continued success here in Hamilton and will forever be part of the Forge FC family,” he added in a statement.Edgar has made 26 appearances (23 starts) with Forge, including 21 in CPL play and five CONCACAF League matches. Edgar represented Canada in three FIFA World Cup qualifying cycles and two CONCACAF Gold Cups as well as CONCACAF Nations League qualifying. He was third in voting as a nominee for the Canadian Player of the Year Award in 2014.He scored international goals against Cuba, Jamaica, Uzbekistan and El Salvador, adding three assists in Canadian colours.At the international youth level, Edgar was a Canadian U-20 Player of the Year Award winner in 2006. Edgar was 15 when he made his debut in the Canadian youth program with coach Ray Clark and was the first Canadian selected to three FIFA U-20 World Cups, starting with UAE 2003 when Canada reached the quarterfinals.On his 19th birthday — May 19, 2006 — he scored the opening goal in a 2-1 win over Brazil in Edmonton, Canada’s first victory at the men’s youth level against the South American powerhouse.Edgar is currently enrolled in the National Teams Education Program, which supports the coach education of its current and former national team players.—Follow @NeilMDavidson on Twitter This report by The Canadian Press was first published Nov. 30, 2020Neil Davidson, The Canadian Press

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