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Indigenous art set to soar on Gordie Howe International Bridge project

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Indigenous artists and a project co-ordinator who created massive artworks set to adorn the Canadian-side tower of the Gordie Howe International Bridge say they hope their work represents more than just artistic beauty.

Several enormous paintings created by three artists — Teresa Altiman and Daisy White of Walpole Island First Nation, and Naomi Peters of Caldwell First Nation — will rise into the air up to 220 metres as the tower on this side of the border is constructed. The bridge company approached Paul White of Walpole Island First Nation to coordinate the effort.

White said his hope is that when people see these works, they’ll ask themselves the tough questions that may lead to education and healing.

“And through those answers they gain an understanding of the artists as Native people, and Native people in general, and the messages Native people are trying to convey through their art,” said White.

“[It’s] A way of really increasing the understanding between all the peoples of Canada and the United States too, and it’s just there is no better way to display it or describe it.”

 

Caldwell First Nation artist Naomi Peters works away on her piece for the Gordie Howe International Bridge project. (Submitted by Naomi Peters)

 

The artworks have now been installed, and the rise will be slow as construction on the tower begins. Once construction is over, the artworks will be repurposed in some way, say bridge company officials.

For her part, Peters painted a picture of a hoop dancer that is five metres by seven metres.

“I dedicated over a week to it, and I was working day to night,” she told CBC’s Afternoon Drive host Chris dela Torre.

“I’ve done a lot of larger canvas work. When I was young, my dad used to paint walls, and he taught me how to do it properly, so I had a little bit of a handle on it, but it really was a new experience, especially seeing those large panels. Holding them up, like you needed two people to even move them around.”

 

Peters said this is the largest artwork she’s ever created before, and was overwhelmed at first. (Submitted by Naomi Peters)

 

As with each of the artworks and the intricate details they include, Peters’ hoop dancer has great meaning behind it.

“I knew I wanted to do something that represented a lot of different tribes … Originally I was going to do something from my Pottawatomie heritage, like the grass dance or something, but I realized that would be a bit non-inclusive for other tribes,” she said.

“So the hoop dance is something that a lot of tribes can participate in and people who are even non-Indigenous are allowed to participate in without any kind of decorum … I just wanted to show you something that everyone could enjoy.”

LISTEN | Hear more from Peters about how she created her work and what it means to her:

 

Afternoon Drive7:04Indigenous artists featured on Gordie Howe International Bridge project

A massive art project is set to be revealed as part of the Gordie Howe International Bridge project. Afternoon Drive host Chris dela Torre speaks with Caldwell First Nation artist Naomi Peters about the undertaking. 7:04

The painting process took place at an arena near Walpole Island First Nation, and White’s construction team helped the three female artists with the big undertaking.

Workers traced sketches as outlines and even helped with some of the painting, which Altiman, who is 72-years-old, said she greatly appreciated.

Altiman’s painting of a bear and three cubs  — white, red, black and yellow — are sacred colours to the Ojibway people, she said.

“For me, I was hoping that our art that we had on the bridge would be a teaching tool, that we are teaching people a little bit about who we are as a First Nation people, as Indigenous people,” she said.

“And so the four colours are telling you something. They’re telling you that these are all the colours of the people of the world.”

 

Walpole Island First Nation artist Teresa Altiman created the works of a bear and three cubs. Daisy White, 17, also of Walpole Island First Nation, created the centre artwork seen here. (Darrin Di Carlo/CBC)

 

Altiman also emphasizes how important it was that her fellow contributors are young women.

“I think it is really phenomenal that this is happening for them as young artists, and certainly for myself as an older artist. I mean, I am honoured that this is happening and that my work is going to be shown in such a prominent location.”

Source:- CBC.ca

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Public invited to take part in Black History Month art project – Chatham Daily News

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The Thames Art Gallery and ARTspace will celebrate Black History Month this February by inviting the community to contribute to an artwork project.

For centuries, people of African descent have confronted and continue to confront prejudice and inequity, the gallery stated, with systemic barriers still preventing full and equal participation in society.

“Almost nine months after George Floyd’s death, the rise of Black Lives Matter, and C-K’s own peaceful march down King Street, we want to keep carrying it forward,” said gallery curator Phil Vanderwall in a release.

“Creativity can help us to confront and overcome our challenges. Art can help us create the world we want to live in and what better way to focus our energies than to join together as a community and participate in a positive vision for 2021?”

“Celebrating Black Lives” is the theme of this digitally based installation. Anyone who wishes to participate can complete a work of art on the theme in any media. Feel free to paint, draw, design, or write.

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Artists sought for Five Corners public art project in downtown Chilliwack – Chilliwack Progress

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The City of Chilliwack is looking for artists to submit their ideas for a new piece of public art to be installed at Five Corners.

The city issued a request for proposals (RFP) for the Five Corners Public Art Project on Jan. 11. The future artwork will be situated outside the front entrance of 46115 Yale Rd., located at the northeast corner of the intersection.

“The successful proponent will create and install public art that will add value to the cultural, aesthetic and economic vitality of the downtown core of Chilliwack,” reads the RFP document.

The proposed public art must:

• Fit in a footprint of 1.5 metres by 1.5 metres

• Be no more than 3 metres high

• Must be able to be illuminated

• Installation must be able to stand up to graffiti, natural elements

• Footprint must be secured to ensure the piece’s integrity and public safety

• Not impede traffic (ie must not be reflective)

RELATED: Public art stands tall in roundabout at Vedder Bridge in Chilliwack

RELATED: Photos of inaugural 2020 Chilliwack Mural Festival

“The goal of the Five Corners Public Art Installation is to increase foot traffic on the street, animate Chilliwack’s historic downtown and draw attention to Chilliwack as a vital municipality which promotes arts, culture and tourism.”

There will be a mandatory virtual site meeting through Zoom on Friday, Jan. 22 at 8 a.m. Proposals will not be accepted by the city from proponents who do not attend the meeting. (Link to Zoom meeting at end of story.)

Proposals can be submitted electronically (preferred) or as a hard copy. Deadline for submissions is Wednesday, Feb. 17 at 3 p.m.Submissions must include a technical proposal and a financial proposal. Electronic submissions are to be emailed to bids@chilliwack.com; hard copy proposals are to be delivered to:

RFP – “Five Corners Public Art”

City of Chilliwack

8550 Young Rd.

Chilliwack, B.C. V2P 8A4

CONFIDENTIAL – DO NOT OPEN

The successful proponent will be notified within 30 days of the Feb. 17 closing date.

Further information on the Five Corners Public Art Project can be found on the city’s website: Five Corners Project document and mandatory virtual site meeting via Zoom.


 

Do you have something to add to this story, or something else we should report on?
Email: jenna.hauck@theprogress.com
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Public invited to take part in Black History Month art project – The Beacon Herald

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Article content

The Thames Art Gallery and ARTspace will celebrate Black History Month this February by inviting the community to contribute to an artwork project.

For centuries, people of African descent have confronted and continue to confront prejudice and inequity, the gallery stated, with systemic barriers still preventing full and equal participation in society.

“Almost nine months after George Floyd’s death, the rise of Black Lives Matter, and C-K’s own peaceful march down King Street, we want to keep carrying it forward,” said gallery curator Phil Vanderwall in a release.

“Creativity can help us to confront and overcome our challenges. Art can help us create the world we want to live in and what better way to focus our energies than to join together as a community and participate in a positive vision for 2021?”

“Celebrating Black Lives” is the theme of this digitally based installation. Anyone who wishes to participate can complete a work of art on the theme in any media. Feel free to paint, draw, design, or write.

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