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Indigenous genocide finding hangs over Canada's Myanmar court intervention – CTV News

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OTTAWA —
Cries of the pot calling the kettle black are emerging after Canada joined an international genocide lawsuit against Myanmar, because the national inquiry into missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls said Canada’s Indigenous Peoples are genocide victims.

Canada and the Netherlands announced with great fanfare this week that they were joining the genocide application launched by Gambia against Myanmar at the International Court of Justice in The Hague as interveners.

Gambia filed the case last fall on behalf of the 57 Muslim countries in the Organization of Islamic Co-operation under the 1948 Genocide Convention.

More than 850,000 Rohingya Muslims have fled Rakhine state after being targeted by Myanmar security forces, who killed thousands while burning villages and engaging in ethnic cleansing and gang rape.

Foreign Affairs Minister Francois-Philippe Champagne and his Dutch counterpart Stef Blok said their countries were joining the case to assist Gambia with “complex legal issues” in the case.

But Bruno Gelinas-Faucher, a University of Montreal international law expert who has worked at the ICJ, said Canada’s presence could cause delays and complications for the Gambian case because of an international legal axiom known as the “clean-hand” principle.

“There’s a risk for Canada to be perceived as adopting a contradictory position of leading a very active foreign policy based on prevention of genocide abroad, and at home, not responding to fully for the calls for justice made by the (inquiry),” said Gelinas-Faucher.

“I think there is a very important element for Canada not to be seen as putting forth this contradictory position in the world, and to be coherent — have a coherent foreign policy that is in line with its domestic policy as well.”

Gelinas-Faucher said it is likely Myanmar will raise the Canadian genocide finding in legal arguments that would seek to block Canada from gaining standing in the case. He said that could further brake the already slow-moving wheels of the international court and delay the case for as much as a year.

In June 2019, the landmark Canadian report on the victimizing of Indigenous women issued more than 200 recommendations and declared that violence against First Nations, Metis and Inuit women and girls was a form of genocide as that the crisis was “centuries in the making.”

Champagne said in an interview that he’s not concerned about Canada’s position on Indigenous issues at home, and that he is content to let “legal experts debate legal issues.”

“This is not about Canada. This is about genocide committed in Myanmar, and therefore I think Canada has every right to be standing side by side with a country like The Gambia, which is taking the leadership position and being supported by countries like the Netherlands and Canada,” Champagne said.

Another leading international legal expert said Canada has little to worry about, and that it should be joining the case against Myanmar.

Errol Mendes, a University of Ottawa international law specialist who has served as a United Nations adviser, said there is much to distinguish Canada from Myanmar on the question of genocide.

“I hope our many attempts to reconcile with our Indigenous Peoples will set us apart from the type of actions in Myanmar that we have not seen since the Nazi regime, the Rwanda genocide and the Bosnian genocide,” said Mendes.

“We are far from angels, but hopefully we are not in the same league of those that were involved in these genocides.”

Canada also brings a lot of international expertise to the case because it helped create the Rome Statute that established the International Criminal Court, said Mendes.

“We helped develop the Statute of the Court that includes express provisions on gender violence and rape as indicia of genocide,” said Mendes, which he said is relevant in the case against Myanmar at the separate International Court of Justice because of the allegations of sexual violence against its military.

Gelinas-Faucher said Canada’s feminist foreign policy does leave it well-suited to add value to the case against Myanmar. But the government will have to take concrete action to address the domestic genocide allegations contained in last year’s inquiry report.

“It has to show clearly its commitment to implement fully the recommendations and one of the elements is they said they would create a task force to implement these recommendations, which we haven’t seen yet,” he said.

Champagne said Canada is consulting with Gambia and believes its feminist foreign policy has a role to play in the case.

“We’ve seen acts of genocide, systemic murder, sexual violence, torture,” the minister said. “The international community is more seized now than ever with the plight of the Rohingya.”

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Sept. 6, 2020.

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We looked at every confirmed COVID-19 case in Canada. Here's what we found – CBC.ca

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Canada’s first known case of COVID-19 was detected eight months ago this week. As of Sept. 22, the coronavirus has been confirmed in 146,663 people across the country.

CBC News has dug deep into the data collected by the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) to examine how COVID-19, the illness caused by the virus, affects the young, the elderly, men and women in order to better understand what’s most likely to land you in hospital — or worse.

The data contains details on 121,795 cases up to the first week of September. See the methodology at the bottom to learn more.

Here are our findings.

Who is getting the virus?

In the early days, people over 80 years old made up the largest group getting sick as long-term care homes were hit hard, resulting in more older people getting tested.

But CBC’s analysis reveals that since mid-August, infections among young people (under 30) have surged and now, after a summer of provincial reopenings and expanded testing, cumulatively outnumber the elderly.

COVID-19 infections are also on the rise among the very youngest (under 20) as schools, colleges and universities reopen.

How is the virus affecting us?

Symptoms can vary by age group from youngest to oldest. Chills, sore throat and runny nose were reported more frequently among those under 50.

PHAC only has symptom data on seven per cent of cases in the detailed data as not every province records this. The way symptoms are defined and recorded may also vary across jurisdictions. But the 9,000 cases that do list those details suggest that people with COVID-19 suffer differently depending on age and symptoms.

*Other symptoms can include loss of taste and smell.

Who’s being hospitalized?

Close to 10 per cent of people who tested positive for coronavirus wound up in hospital, according to the cases tracked by PHAC.

Two per cent of cases landed in intensive care units (ICU) across all ages but mostly among people over 50.


In people admitted to hospital, shortness of breath and fever were more common symptoms while headaches, sore throat and runny nose were seen more often in less severe cases.

In fatal cases, shortness of breath and fever were also more common. 

“Keep in mind that mortality is often through respiratory distress,” said University of Ottawa epidemiologist Raywat Deonandan.

“It’s not surprising that those showing an early symptom of that distress [shortness of breath] would be on a shorter path to death.”

Deaths and serious illness

More than 9,200 people have died in Canada because of COVID-19.

Of all confirmed infections in Canada, six per cent, or 9,274 cases, have been fatal, with the elderly hit the hardest. Only two people under 20 are known to have died from the disease so far.

The age gap in deaths is so wide that the chart below had to be stretched for the younger victims to be visible:

More women in Canada have died from COVID-19, especially in the 80+ age group where they outnumber men. Outside that age group, more men are dying from the virus.

Deonandan says differences between men and women’s health might be affecting COVID-19 outcomes.

“Older men are more likely than women to have serious heart disease. COVID-19 might be expressing mortality through these disproportionate vulnerabilities that already exist,” he said.

But more men have been hospitalized or wound up in an ICU with COVID-19.

Recovery

By Sept. 22, of the 146,663 confirmed and presumptive cases in Canada, 126,905 had recovered.

Canada’s public health data only shows recovery times for about 10 per cent of cases.

Older people tend to suffer longer (based on this small sample), not surprising given the greater presence of other medical conditions among the elderly.

Some COVID-19 cases took as many as 11 weeks to resolve, though the average recovery time is two to three weeks.


“Older people are more likely to be hospitalized and need more intensive interventions, which in turn are associated with longer recovery periods,” said Deonandan.

Similarly, more severe cases that required hospitalization had longer recovery times.

The future

The fall return to school has health officials bracing for a rise in exposures and new infections, particularly among young people.

The data shows that the youngest cohort, age 19 or younger, is making up an increasingly larger share of Canada’s overall cases and by early September had overtaken people in their 70s.

METHODOLOGY

The main data source for this article is the detailed preliminary information on confirmed cases of COVID-19 compiled by the Public Health Agency of Canada and published by Statistics Canada.

The data is based on a case report form that provincial authorities send to PHAC for each confirmed case.

Provinces might define a confirmed case, symptoms and recovery time differently, so that must be taken into account when interpreting the data.

Not every province reports symptoms and recoveries, and those that do don’t report them for every case. Only about 9,000 cases out of 121,795 in the data contain symptom information, and only about 12,500 cases contain the recovery date.

Symptom onset and recovery dates are noted only with the week of the year. Recovery times were calculated by subtracting the recovery week from the diagnosis week and do not account for possible variations in days.

In some cases, details are excluded or modified by Statistics Canada if there is a risk of identifying a patient in the data. For example, the data does not show any fatal cases under 50 years of age, even though there were nearly 80 such cases in the daily epidemiological report from PHAC, which contains the most recent confirmed numbers. CBC used the daily epidemiological data for the chart on deaths by age and gender.

The data analysis was done in Python. Questions about how it was done? Contact data journalist Roberto Rocha at roberto.rocha@cbc.ca.

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Things To Consider When Getting Motor Vehicle Insurance

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Owning and driving a vehicle is an exciting milestone. It brings about a level of independence that you might not have enjoyed before when you had to rely on others or public transport to get around. With car ownership comes the complex process of getting the right motor vehicle insurance. Several factors have to be taken into consideration when deciding which one works best for you.

 

Here’s a list of things to consider when getting motor vehicle insurance:

  1. Paperwork

 

Before you look into the kind of insurance to get, make sure that you have the correct paperwork required for the process. This usually includes a valid license and registration. Remember, the one who is registered is the one who has to apply for the insurance and drive the car majority of the time. You can’t have another party apply for insurance for you .

 

  1. Research

Once you have your documentation in order, dedicate some time researching different insurance providers. Familiarize with  Nova Scotia insurance laws and the standard insurance policy form. Knowing your local laws and how insurance works allow you to understand what you’re signing up for and what you’re entitled to in case an accident occurs.

The insurance dynamics you need to look into include the type of insurance and what exactly it covers. For instance, during your research, you’ll encounter a third party, third party fire and theft, and fully comprehensive car insurance options.

Third-party insurance is the minimum insurance required by the law, covering damages in an accident caused by another person. Third-party fire and theft insurance packages cover the basic legal requirements of insurance as well as damages caused by fire or theft. The fully comprehensive policy covers different types of damages, events, and scenarios. Different insurance companies cover different scenarios and factors for their fully comprehensive policies. You can get more information by requesting for a quote from the insurance company.

Once you research the various insurance dynamics that are provided by various providers, you’ll be able to figure out which one offers a policy that best suits your needs.

 

  1. Calculate Mileage

Every insurance policy application includes information about your mileage. This information is required because the further or more frequently you drive, the higher the risks of you getting involved in an accident, making your premiums more expensive. Make sure to be accurate about the information you provide about your mileage. In case you’re involved in an accident and the mileage recorded doesn’t match with the mileage assessed at the time of the accident, you might not get paid out.

Mileage costs are factored in differently depending on the insurance provider you choose. This can be calculated through quotes and consultations.

 

  1. Online Reviews

Independent online reviews about specific insurance motor vehicle providers can indicate whether they’re reliable or not. You must however use your discretion when analyzing online reviews as not all are authentic. The more positive the reviews, the more likely you’ll have a positive experience when you choose that specific provider.

 

  1. Consultation

Now that you’ve already come up with a list of your top options, it’s highly recommended to have a consultation session with these potential insurance providers. You can discuss and ask about certain details during this time, such as what the insurance company doesn’t cover. You can also get information about what they explicitly cover to avoid any assumptions or confusion. Give them a call, visit their office, or use the various contact channels provided by the insurance providers on their websites.

 

  1. Financial Means

When getting insurance, you must factor in your personal finances for monthly payments. Choosing an insurance provider and policy that can fit into your budget is advisable. It’ll be tough to commit to a policy only to find later on that you’ll be struggling to pay it off. Compare the different insurance policy costs and choose one that you can reasonably handle along with your other expenses.

 

Conclusion

Finding the right motor vehicle insurance requires effort on your side. You want to make sure that you’re securing the insurance policy and insurance provider that is right for you. Before you start the process, make sure that you have the correct documentation in order. Take the time to calculate your mileage as this is information that will be required from you. Research about the local motor vehicle insurance standards and regulations to know exactly what you’re signing up for. Once you’re familiar with the legal dynamics, don’t forget to factor in your finances and make sure you’re choosing one that budget.

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Mapping out Canada's COVID-19 hotspots: new modelling shows where cases are rising – CTV News

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TORONTO —
A map released by the federal government Tuesday as part of new COVID-19 modelling data shows that over the last 14 days, the rise in cases has been far from even across the country, with several hotspots bumping up numbers nationwide.

Canada has been experiencing a worrying uptick in new cases recently, leading federal health officials to recommend that we re-adopt earlier, more strict levels of health precautions.

Dr. Theresa Tam stopped short of calling it a second wave on Tuesday, noting that it’s too early to tell whether cases will continue trending upwards or go back down, but cautioned that a new jump in cases could “overwhelm our health system capacity and significantly impact social and economic systems as well.”

According to the latest modelling data, the hotspots across Canada are largely centred around metropolitan areas, but also, in some instances, include regions that saw far lower case levels in the first wave of the pandemic.

WHERE ARE THE NEW CASES?

The map of recent case data shows that the three territories in Canada’s north have had zero new cases over the past two weeks, along with Labrador, northern Manitoba, and some regions of northern Quebec.

The Atlantic provinces have also fared well, with regions ranging from zero cases to four for every 100,000 people.

The darkest regions of the map, which represented areas with 50 to 99 new cases per 100,000 people, were northern Alberta, the Edmonton region, several regions around Quebec City and up the St. Lawrence River, the Gatineau region directly across the river from Ottawa, and in B.C. the region around Vancouver.

One difference from the first wave is that across the country, more cases are thought to be due to community spread, as opposed to outbreaks in long-term care facilities, which pushed numbers up earlier in the pandemic. This likely reflects the fact that Canadians have been returning to workplaces, retail spaces and larger gatherings as provinces have loosened restrictions over the last few weeks.

The map was put together with data from the COVID-19 Canada Open Data Working Group.

QUEBEC

In Quebec, 489 new cases were confirmed on Tuesday.

The province’s health minister, Christian Dube, announced on Tuesday that two more regions in Quebec were moving from yellow (denoting regions in Level 2 – Early Warning) to orange (Level 3 – Alert). Laval and Outaouais joined Montreal, the Quebec City region and Chaudiere-Appalaches to make five regions of Quebec in Level 3.

Regions in Level 3 have extra measures to “target specific sectors of activity and settings where the risk of transmission is deemed higher,” according to the province.

Outaouais, which has had 1,157 cases of COVID-19 since the start of the pandemic, is one of the regions with the highest levels of new cases in the province (50 to 99 per 100,000), according to the map released Thursday, along with the Quebec City area, Chaudiere-Appalaches, and Bas-Saint-Laurent.

Bas-Saint-Laurent has had 274 total confirmed cases since the start of the pandemic. Capitale-Nationale has had 3,153.

Dube pointed out that the new cases are not necessarily following the same path as the first wave.

“We see that regions that have been spared such as Capitale-Nationale, Chaudiere-Appalaches during the first wave are now very affected by the virus,” he said.

Quebec’s public health director Dr. Horacio Arruda said on Monday that the province had officially hit a second wave after they reported 586 new cases.

ONTARIO

Although vast swaths of Ontario are seeing barely any new cases, in the most populated regions of the province it’s a different story. The province recorded 478 new cases of COVID-19 on Tuesday, which is the highest number for a single day since May 2, when 511 cases were reported.

Most of these new cases are in Ottawa, Peel region and Toronto, with 90, 95, and 153 new cases respectively.

ALBERTA

In the province’s capital, the COVID-19 case count reached the highest it has ever been since the start of the pandemic last week. Including the region around the city as well, the Edmonton area had 751 active cases of COVID-19 last Thursday, which was more than half of Alberta’s active cases at the time.

Within the city, the neighbourhoods with the highest active case count were Northgate with 109 cases, Northeast with 104 and Eastwood with 74.

The province as a whole reported 150 new cases of COVID-19 on Tuesday, bringing them to more than 1,500 active cases. 

BRITISH COLUMBIA

On the map showing hotspots, it appears as though two separate regions on British Columbia’s coast are experiencing a surge, but they actually are counted together — both fall under the Vancouver Coastal Health region, and are assessed as one area.

There have been nearly 3,000 cases recorded in the Vancouver Coastal Health region, with more than 4,200 recorded in the neighbouring Fraser Health region. The new modelling showed that the Fraser Health region has had 20 to 49 new cases for every 100,000 people over the last two weeks, putting them in the second highest category on the map.

A new outbreak at Vancouver’s St. Paul’s Hospital was discovered Tuesday, according to provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry.

Over the weekend, 366 cases of COVID-19 within the province were recorded, and 96 new cases were identified on Tuesday.  

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