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iPhone 12 Models Might Support Reverse Charging of Future Apple Accessories According to FCC Filing – MacRumors

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iPhone 11 Pro Outlasts iPhone 12 and 12 Pro in Extensive Battery Life Test

Arun Maini today shared a new side-by-side iPhone battery life video test on his YouTube channel Mrwhosetheboss, timing how long the new iPhone 12 and iPhone 12 Pro models last on a single charge compared to older models, with equal brightness, settings, battery health, and usage. All of the devices are running iOS 14 without a SIM card inserted.
In the test, the iPhone 11 Pro outlasted both …

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A retail listing has revealed The Last of Us Part 2 PS5 upgrade could be in the works – VG247

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By Dom Peppiatt,
Monday, 23 November 2020 14:28 GMT

A next-gen upgrade may be in the works for Naughty Dog’s latest game, making The Last of Us Part 2 PS5 a reality sooner than we thought.

A store listing for The Last of Us Part 2 has appeared over at Best Buy that suggests a next-gen update for the game could be in the works at Naughty Dog.

The Best Buy store listing for the PlayStation 4 physical copy of one of 2020’s biggest games includes a tag that reads “includes next-gen upgrade”.

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The development studio itself hasn’t formally announced any specific upgrades for The Last of Us Part 2 on PS5 – though the game does benefit from all the usual system-side upgrades backwards compatible games enjoy if you boot it up on the new hardware (including faster loading times and so on).

The Last of Us Part 2 also supports haptic feedback via the DualSense controller on PS5, but that’s about the extent of its next-gen support at the time of writing.

It may be that Best Buy has made the listing in error, and we’re not going to see more upgrades released for the game, but given that other PlayStation exclusives have received patches to make them perform better on the new hardware, that seems unlikely.

The Last of Us Part 2 is one of the biggest games of the year, is a critical hit, and won over a lot of players’ hearts as you can see in our review.

There’s also no mention of an upgrade on The Last of Us Part 2’s PS5 store listing page, though, so take Best Buy’s tag with a pinch of salt. The official Sony description for the game on PS5 actually notes that “while this game is playable on the PS5, some features available on PS4 may be absent”.

Last week, HBO greenlit a series based on The Last of Us that’s due to go into production soon. It will be helmed by Chernobyl’s Craig Mazin and executive produced and written by Neil Druckmann.

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Used batteries are a safety hazard – Richmond News

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Did you know storing old batteries in a drawer or tossing them in the garbage is a safety hazard?

“Used batteries can still hold a residual charge. If you throw them in the garbage or store them with other batteries or metal items such as paper clips, they have the potential to cause a spark that could lead to a fire,” says Joe Zenobio, president, Call2Recycle Canada, Inc., Canada’s national not-for-profit consumer battery collection and recycling program. “Batteries can and should be responsibly recycled.”

Batteries cannot be put in municipal curbside recycling programs because residential recycling facilities are not designed to separate batteries from household recyclables. Due to their metals, batteries require a specialized recycling process, not to mention they can be a safety concern for people and property. However, it’s easy to drop off your used batteries for recycling at one of Call2Recycle®neighbourhood collection locations.

Although safety is reason enough to recycle your batteries, there are other valuable benefits. Used batteries often contain hazardous waste materials. By keeping your old batteries out of your local landfill, you’re helping to protect wildlife and the environment.

To recycle your batteries safely, follow these steps:

Bag them.Place all used, undamaged batteries in clear, plastic, produce-style bags. The bags will protect the batteries from sparking both in your home and while being transported for recycling.

Check for damage. If you have a battery that is swollen, corroded, leaking or showing burn marks, place it immediately in sand or kitty litter in a cool, dry place. Then, place it in a bag and take it to your municipal household hazardous waste (HHW) recycling centre. Do not put it in the garbage.

Drop them.Transport your bagged batteries to a Call2Recycle collection location. To find the battery collection and recycling location nearest to you, visit www.call2recycle.ca/locator. Call2Recyce will recycle the batteries and the recyclable bags used to safely protect the batteries.

Keep them cool. If you don’t plan to take your used batteries immediately to a collection location, store the bagged batteries in a cool, dry place in a non-metal container.

More information on battery recycling can be found at call2recycle.ca.

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Smelling blood, Huawei’s Chinese mobile rivals look to capitalise on its U.S. woes – Reuters Canada

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SHENZHEN, China (Reuters) – Chinese handset rivals of Huawei Technologies including Xiaomi, Oppo and Vivo are making aggressive moves to seize market share from their giant rival, after stepped-up U.S. sanctions hobbled Huawei’s supply chains, industry insiders say.

FILE PHOTO: A smartphone with the Huawei and 5G network logo is seen on a PC motherboard in this illustration picture taken January 29, 2020. REUTERS/Dado Ruvic/File Photo

Last week Huawei said it had sold its budget brand smartphone unit Honor for an undisclosed sum in a bid to safeguard the latter’s supply chain from U.S. action, which has made it difficult to source essential components.

All the same, Huawei’s Chinese rivals smell blood in the mid- to high-end phone market. In August a Huawei executive said the company will not be able to produce its flagship processors that power its high-end smartphones.

“What we can see now, whether from Xiaomi, Oppo or Vivo, is that they’re raising their forecasts for next year,” said Derek Wang, an executive in charge of production at handset maker Realme, which shares a supply chain with Oppo.

“They believe the sanctions against Huawei will more or less hurt it in the international market, and they may want to take a share of the market from Huawei.”

Founded in 2018, Realme is on course to double its smartphone shipments to 50 million this year, Wang said. It has built a base with low price-offerings in Southeast Asia and India, and is looking to target Europe and China next year with a push into the high-end market, regardless of Huawei’s situation, Wang said.

In August, the U.S. Commerce Department further choked Huawei’s access to U.S. technology essential to its handset business, on the grounds that Huawei poses a security threat – a charge Huawei denies.[L4N2FK1NT]

Huawei briefly overtook Samsung as the world’s biggest handset maker in the first half of this year, before shipments fell 23% to 51.7 million units in the third quarter, according to research firm Canalys.

Huawei still commanded 41.2% of the market in the third quarter, followed by Vivo with 18.4%, Oppo with 16.8% and Xiaomi with 12.6%, Canalys said. Apple has a lower share in China with 6.2%, but is attracting strong demand for its 5G iPhone 12, Canalys said.

Slideshow ( 2 images )

(Graphic: China Smartphone Shipments, Q3 2020 (Millions) )

Industry watchers have confirmed a ramping up of orders from vendors. Xiaomi has been most bullish, placing enough orders for up to 100 million phones between the fourth quarter of 2020 and first quarter of 2021, up 50% on projections before the August restrictions, consultancy Isaiah Research says.

Oppo and Vivo’s production forecasts had also risen by around 8% each since August, with orders for up to 90 million and 70 million handsets respectively, Isaiah Research’s data showed.

Conversely, Huawei orders fell 55% to 42 million handsets in that time.

All four companies declined to comment on the numbers.

Xiaomi is also attempting to court Huawei’s distributors in Southeast Asia and Europe in the hopes of gaining exclusive deals, and is actively targeting Huawei’s high-end market share in China, said a source at Xiaomi familiar with the matter.

Five industry sources on the supply chain side confirmed they had a surge in orders from the three companies.

Some analysts believe the companies might be too optimistic about their targets, but Realme’s Wang said stockpiling of components have also been driven by disruption to production caused by COVID-19 lockdowns earlier in the year and because Huawei’s move to boost its inventories impacted rivals’ supply chains.

The rush to secure supplies has reverberated across the electronics chain, said Paul Weedman, a supply chain project manager. “Prices have been rocketing recently,” he said, noting that it has become much harder to source LCD screens even for tablets.

Analysts said Huawei’s sale of Honor may partly fend off competitors’ intrusion into the budget-end of the market, provided that Honor is able to resume sourcing U.S. technology.

“We still expect clear year-on-year growth from Huawei and Honor’s smartphone rivals in 2021, but likely at a lower ratio than their earliest expectation.” said Flora Tang, an analyst with research firm Counterpoint.

Reporting by David Kirton; Editing by Shri Navaratnam and Emelia Sithole-Matarise

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