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Join Jabs Army now and help rollout Oxford’s groundbreaking Covid vaccine – The Sun

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BORIS Johnson yesterday hailed the arrival of a life-saving jab — and predicted the war against coronavirus will soon be won.

The PM declared the new Oxford vaccine a “triumph of British science” as the first 530,000 doses were delivered to key hospitals.

⚠️ Read our coronavirus live blog for the latest news & updates

The first batch of the new Oxford vaccine arrived at Princess Royal Hospital in Haywards HeathCredit: PA:Press Association
The first 530,000 doses have been delivered to key hospitals
The first 530,000 doses have been delivered to key hospitalsCredit: PA:Press Association
Key workers queued for the vaccine in Brighton
Key workers queued for the vaccine in Brighton

Bosses at the NHS were last night scaling up for tomorrow’s launch of the biggest immunisation programme in its history.

Despite the size of the operation and the threat posed by a ­virulent new Covid variant, Mr Johnson is convinced the Oxford AstraZeneca vaccine will soon have the virus in retreat.

He said: “We know there are challenges still ahead of us over the coming weeks and months, but I’m confident this is the year we will defeat coronavirus and start building back better.”

Britain has ordered 100million doses of the vaccine — enough for 50million people. It means that along with the 40million doses of the Pfizer treatment, the UK has enough jab-power to protect the entire population.

The NHS will be the first health service in the world to deliver the new jab, which was approved by regulators only last week.

But NHS medics and an army of volunteers face a race against time to administer the vaccine before the virus wreaks further devastation.

Boris Johnson has predicted the war against coronavirus will soon be won
Boris Johnson has predicted the war against coronavirus will soon be wonCredit: PA:Press Association

Health Secretary Matt Hancock welcomed the arrival of the new jab as “a historic day and cause for celebration”.

The first batch arrived at Princess Royal Hospital in Haywards Heath, part of the Brighton and Sussex University Hospitals NHS Trust.

It is one of six hospital trusts that will start delivering the vaccine for the first few days under close monitoring conditions.

The others are the Royal Free and Guy’s and St Thomas’ in London, Oxford University Hospitals, University Hospitals of Morecambe Bay, Lancs, and the George Eliot Hospital in Nuneaton, Warwickshire.

Bulk supplies will then be sent to hundreds of GP-led services later in the week.

Hundreds of vaccination sites are due to come on stream, joining 700 already in operation.

The Army has been given the go-ahead to deploy hundreds of vaccination “surge teams” to help the mass roll-out.

They will be involved in transporting batches and even helping administer them.

Defence Secretary Ben Wallace has enough teams of combat medics ready to roll out 100,000 doses a day if required.

The military has been embedded at the NHS headquarters for the past few weeks.

Brigadier Phil Prosser, commander of 101 Logistics Brigade, has a desk on the top floor and has been chairing daily meetings with officials.

There is more than just the ­vaccine to deliver — with 12million pieces of equipment, including manuals, masks and surgical gloves.

How to sign up

VOLUNTEERS for the Jabs Army are being asked to first register online at nhsvolunteerresponders.org.uk

You will then receive an email with log-in details to sign up online.

Finally, you will be asked to download the GoodSAM app on a smartphone which will match you to a role in your area.

Services will be opening in the coming days and weeks, with different areas up and running at different times, so you might not be required on site for some weeks. Not everyone who signs up will need to be called upon.

You need to commit to only two six-hour shifts a month at a vaccination service, and no prior experience or qualifications are required.

You will work as part of a team that will include NHS staff and volunteers. The Royal Voluntary Service will conduct appropriate background checks.

Go to nhsvolunteerresponders.org.uk

And, if the PM’s earlier target of easing restrictions by Easter is to be met, vaccinations would have to run close to 1.5million a week by the end of the month and rise to more than 2million.

There are doubts whether AstraZeneca supplies can match that sort of demand.

But more Pfizer supplies are due next month, which makes the target realistic, if difficult.

The brigadier, experienced in ­crisis management and operational planning, has said: “The British Army soldier is proud to be part of the nation’s response to this unprecedented challenge.”

An MoD spokesman said: “The Armed ­Forces have personnel, including specialist planners, logisticians, and medics ready to support responses to the outbreak however required.”

The vaccination programme — the biggest in NHS history — has got off to a strong start

NHS chief executive Sir Simon Stevens

The Oxford vaccine is the second vaccine to be given the go ahead in the UK after the roll-out of the Pfizer jab began last month.

As it can be kept at normal fridge temperature, it is easier to store and administer than the Pfizer treatment which needs cold storage at -70C.

NHS chief executive Sir Simon Stevens said: “The delivery of the Oxford AstraZeneca vaccine marks another first for the NHS, and a major milestone in humanity’s ­battle against coronavirus.

“The vaccination programme — the biggest in NHS history — has got off to a strong start, and by New Year’s Day we’d been able to vaccinate more people than the rest of Europe combined.

“Now we have a second, more versatile, jab in our armoury.”

Matt Hancock welcomed the arrival of the new jab as 'a historic day and cause for celebration'
Matt Hancock welcomed the arrival of the new jab as ‘a historic day and cause for celebration’Credit: PA:Press Association
Brigadier Phil Prosser said the British Army was 'proud' to be part of the nation’s response
Brigadier Phil Prosser said the British Army was ‘proud’ to be part of the nation’s response
Maggie Keenan was the first person in the world to be vaccinated against coronavirus
Maggie Keenan was the first person in the world to be vaccinated against coronavirusCredit: @NHSEngland

Mr Hancock warned people to stay on guard, but added: “The vaccine is our way out and this huge achievement brings us a step closer to the normality we’ve all been working hard to reclaim.

“From tomorrow, the British public will begin to receive a second highly effective vaccine, starting with the most vulnerable and frontline care home and NHS staff — another significant milestone in the expansion of the vaccination programme.”

The NHS made history when Maggie Keenan became the first person in the world to be vaccinated against coronavirus — outside of a clinical trial — at Coventry Hospital on December 8.

Celebs in praise of our drive

THE Oxford University team that helped develop the new Covid vaccine has backed our appeal for 50,000 volunteers to help roll out the jab.

They were joined by stars such as Harry Redknapp, Penny Lancaster, Shane Richie and AJ Pritchard, who called on readers to join the nationwide Jabs Army.

Harry Redknapp says we all need to 'get behind the NHS and do our bit'
Harry Redknapp says we all need to ‘get behind the NHS and do our bit’Credit: PA:Press Association
Penny Lancaster has called on Brits to volunteer to help roll out the Covid jab
Penny Lancaster has called on Brits to volunteer to help roll out the Covid jabCredit: Getty Images
Professor Sarah Gilbert, of Oxford University, has urged Brits to consider signing up
Professor Sarah Gilbert, of Oxford University, has urged Brits to consider signing upCredit: PA:Press Association

The Sun has joined the NHS and the Royal Voluntary Service to find volunteer stewards to assist in the campaign to make sure 15million people get a vaccine by March.

So far, 5,871 of you have pledged to join the effort — but more of you are needed.

And Professor Sarah Gilbert, of Oxford University, which developed the vaccine with AstraZeneca, said: “Many people have been sending the team congratulations and saying they wished there was something they could do — and now there is.

“Please consider signing up to help.”

Dr Maheshi Ramasamy, of the Oxford Vaccine Group, said: “The importance of an effective vaccine in preventing Covid is clear.

“Please consider signing up to help deliver vaccinations to those most at risk.”

The more people who volunteer, the quicker we can roll out the jab and get back to normal

Harry Redknapp

Last night, ex-Spurs manager Harry also urged people to join, saying: “We owe it to the NHS to help after what they’ve done for us over the last year.”

I’m A Celeb winner Harry, 73, said: “Everyone who can sign up should — let’s all get behind the NHS and do our bit.

“The more people who volunteer, the quicker we can roll out the jab and get back to normal.

“The NHS have done an utterly fantastic job. But they are now overwhelmed, there are vaccines but not enough people to help give them out.

“If Sun readers sign up, it would be a huge help.”

Loose Women’s Penny Lancaster added: “If ever there has been a time to step up and help, you can, by marshalling people at vaccination stations so they can safely get their jabs.

Brothers Curtis and AJ Pritchard have pledged to become volunteers
Brothers Curtis and AJ Pritchard have pledged to become volunteersCredit: Rex Features

“We need people to enable ­others to get vaccinated and stop this virus’s killing spree.”

Volunteers only need to commit to two six-hour shifts per month at a vaccination service near their home and no prior experience or qualifications are needed.

Brothers AJ and Curtis Pritchard, known for their appearances on Strictly, I’m A Celeb and Love Island, also last night pledged to become volunteers.

AJ said: “Let’s all jive down to help others get a jab. By becoming a volunteer, you’ll be doing your bit to help save a life.”

And Curtis said: “By becoming one of Britain’s Jabs Army volunteers, it will enable the historic vaccination roll-out to happen as quickly as possible.”

Shane Richie has called on readers to join the nationwide 'Jabs Army'
Shane Richie has called on readers to join the nationwide ‘Jabs Army’Credit: Getty Images – Getty

Boris Johnson last night sent a message to his 3.2million Twitter followers praising our drive.

He said: “The Sun’s campaign to help our NHS roll out the UK vaccination programme as fast as possible is a fantastic initiative.

“The British public volunteered in droves to support the NHS last year and I have no doubt they will be determined to help again.”

The Sun on Sunday says

AT LAST the game-changing Oxford Covid jab will be rolled out from tomorrow.

The key role of the military in getting the vaccine speedily to the right people is music to our ears.

And your magnificent response to The Sun’s Jabs Army campaign is truly inspirational.

But the problems in our schools are beginning to run out of control.

The unions are insisting that all schools stay shut for weeks as it is not safe for teachers to return to work.

We cannot afford another damaging stand-off between teachers and the Government.

Poorer kids would lose most in a shutdown as they fall further behind better-off classmates.

The economy would also take a hit as parents cannot go out to work if they have to look after their children.

As a top priority Boris Johnson must consider how to give teachers the jab so they can get back to the classroom in safety.

Otherwise kids and country face another crippling paralysis.

UK Covid cases in highest day EVER with 57,725 infections and 445 more deaths

GOT a story? RING The Sun on 0207 782 4104 or WHATSAPP on 07423720250 or EMAIL exclusive@the-sun.co.uk

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BC to stretch second doses of COVID vaccine to 42 days amid production delay – BC News – Castanet.net

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British Columbia is extending the interval between the two doses of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine, the province’s top doctor said Monday.

Dr. Bonnie Henry told a news briefing that further delays in the production and delivery of the vaccine over the next two weeks prompted health officials to extend the time period between the shots from 35 to 42 days.

“It’s about choosing in the short term to give more people protection from dose one instead of giving some people full protection and leaving others with none,” she said. “We will make up these doses and we will be providing the second dose of vaccine to everybody as soon as we possibly can.”

The province had assured residents last week that it remained committed to administering second doses on Day 35 and Henry said officials learned over the weekend B.C. would receive even fewer doses than expected.

“The amounts that we were expecting to receive in the first week of February have been dramatically reduced,” she said, adding B.C. officials do not yet know how many doses are set to arrive later next month.

The federal government is doing everything in its power to make sure vaccine supply gets back on track, Henry added.

Canada’s National Advisory Committee on Immunization has said prolonging the wait to 42 days is acceptable in places where vaccine supply is limited and where transmission of the illness is high and health-care resources are strained. The World Health Organization has also suggested that waiting up to six weeks after the first dose is acceptable.

About 60 per cent of the more than 119,000 doses of COVID-19 vaccine administered in B.C. so far have been used to protect residents of assisted living and long-term care facilities, said Henry.

That total includes all of the facilities in the Island, Vancouver Coastal and Fraser health regions, she said, while vaccinations in long-term care in the Interior and Northern health authorities are set to wrap up this week.

B.C. recorded 26 more deaths linked to COVID-19 on Monday and 1,344 new cases diagnosed over the last three days.

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The latest numbers on COVID-19 in Canada for Tuesday, Jan. 26, 2021 – Toronto Star

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The latest numbers of confirmed COVID-19 cases in Canada as of 4 a.m. ET on Monday Jan. 26, 2021.

There are 753,011 confirmed cases in Canada.

_ Canada: 753,011 confirmed cases (62,447 active, 671,326 resolved, 19,238 deaths).The total case count includes 13 confirmed cases among repatriated travellers.

There were 4,630 new cases Monday from 35,801 completed tests, for a positivity rate of 13 per cent. The rate of active cases is 166.13 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 37,939 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 5,420.

There were 144 new reported deaths Monday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 1,118 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is 160. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.42 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 51.18 per 100,000 people.

There have been 17,086,340 tests completed.

_ Newfoundland and Labrador: 398 confirmed cases (eight active, 386 resolved, four deaths).

There were zero new cases Monday from 186 completed tests, for a positivity rate of 0.0 per cent. The rate of active cases is 1.53 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of two new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is zero.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is 0.77 per 100,000 people.

There have been 78,319 tests completed.

_ Prince Edward Island: 110 confirmed cases (seven active, 103 resolved, zero deaths).

There were zero new cases Monday from 226 completed tests, for a positivity rate of 0.0 per cent. The rate of active cases is 4.46 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of two new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is zero.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is zero per 100,000 people.

There have been 88,633 tests completed.

_ Nova Scotia: 1,571 confirmed cases (15 active, 1,491 resolved, 65 deaths).

There were zero new cases Monday. The rate of active cases is 1.54 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 14 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is two.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is 6.69 per 100,000 people.

There have been 200,424 tests completed.

_ New Brunswick: 1,151 confirmed cases (349 active, 788 resolved, 14 deaths).

There were 27 new cases Monday from 1,071 completed tests, for a positivity rate of 2.5 per cent. The rate of active cases is 44.93 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 178 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 25.

There was one new reported death Monday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of two new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is zero. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.04 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 1.8 per 100,000 people.

There have been 136,180 tests completed.

_ Quebec: 254,836 confirmed cases (16,428 active, 228,887 resolved, 9,521 deaths).

There were 1,203 new cases Monday. The rate of active cases is 193.61 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 10,488 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 1,498.

There were 43 new reported deaths Monday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 434 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is 62. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.73 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 112.21 per 100,000 people.

There have been 2,695,925 tests completed.

_ Ontario: 256,960 confirmed cases (23,620 active, 227,494 resolved, 5,846 deaths).

There were 1,958 new cases Monday from 33,192 completed tests, for a positivity rate of 5.9 per cent. The rate of active cases is 162.15 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 16,596 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 2,371.

There were 43 new reported deaths Monday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 413 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is 59. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.41 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 40.13 per 100,000 people.

There have been 8,978,001 tests completed.

_ Manitoba: 28,810 confirmed cases (3,542 active, 24,464 resolved, 804 deaths).

There were 113 new cases Monday. The rate of active cases is 258.64 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 1,181 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 169.

There were five new reported deaths Monday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 31 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is four. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.32 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 58.71 per 100,000 people.

There have been 448,638 tests completed.

_ Saskatchewan: 22,416 confirmed cases (3,272 active, 18,890 resolved, 254 deaths).

There were 239 new cases Monday from 992 completed tests, for a positivity rate of 24 per cent. The rate of active cases is 278.6 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 1,854 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 265.

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There was one new reported death Monday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 35 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is five. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.43 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 21.63 per 100,000 people.

There have been 330,694 tests completed.

_ Alberta: 121,535 confirmed cases (9,339 active, 110,622 resolved, 1,574 deaths).

There were 742 new cases Monday. The rate of active cases is 213.64 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 4,224 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 603.

There were 25 new reported deaths Monday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 127 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is 18. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.42 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 36.01 per 100,000 people.

There have been 3,061,844 tests completed.

_ British Columbia: 64,828 confirmed cases (5,843 active, 57,831 resolved, 1,154 deaths).

There were 346 new cases Monday. The rate of active cases is 115.22 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 3,381 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 483.

There were 26 new reported deaths Monday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 76 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is 11. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.21 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 22.76 per 100,000 people.

There have been 1,044,931 tests completed.

_ Yukon: 70 confirmed cases (zero active, 69 resolved, one deaths).

There were zero new cases Monday from 13 completed tests, for a positivity rate of 0.0 per cent. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of zero new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is zero.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is 2.45 per 100,000 people.

There have been 6,229 tests completed.

_ Northwest Territories: 31 confirmed cases (seven active, 24 resolved, zero deaths).

There were zero new cases Monday. The rate of active cases is 15.62 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of three new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is zero.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is zero per 100,000 people.

There have been 9,064 tests completed.

_ Nunavut: 282 confirmed cases (17 active, 264 resolved, one deaths).

There were two new cases Monday from 121 completed tests, for a positivity rate of 1.7 per cent. The rate of active cases is 43.84 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 16 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is two.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is 2.58 per 100,000 people.

There have been 7,382 tests completed.

This report was automatically generated by The Canadian Press Digital Data Desk and was first published Jan. 26, 2021.

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What you need to know about COVID-19 in Ottawa on Tuesday, Jan. 26 – CBC.ca

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Recent developments:

What’s the latest?

If you’ve made the trip to downtown Ottawa recently, you’ve likely noticed the desolate streets and empty storefronts.

CBC asked an architect, an urban planner and geographers what would bring people back to the city’s core after the pandemic.

Officials from that city are giving an update on their vaccine plan starting at 9 a.m. ET. The prime minister and Quebec’s premier are also expected to speak later in the day.

Officials are debating whether additional public health measures are needed to rein in a more contagious coronavirus variant that is now spreading in Ontario, including Ottawa and Kingston.

How many cases are there?

As of Monday, 12,977 Ottawa residents have tested positive for COVID-19. There are 869 known active cases, 11,689 resolved cases and 419 deaths from COVID-19. 

Public health officials have reported more than 24,100 COVID-19 cases across eastern Ontario and western Quebec, including more than 20,900 resolved cases.

One hundred and fourteen people have died of COVID-19 elsewhere in eastern Ontario and 150 people have died in western Quebec. 

CBC Ottawa is profiling those who’ve died of COVID-19. If you’d like to share your loved one’s story, please get in touch.

What can I do?

Ontario says people must only leave home when it’s essential to avoid more COVID-19 cases, hospitalizations and deaths. Some places, like Kingston, Ont., have started taking on patients from other regions struggling with hospital capacity.

People who leave home for non-essential reasons can now be fined, though police won’t stop people just for being outside.

Travel within Ontario is not recommended. Residents who leave the province should isolate for 14 days upon returning.

Private indoor gatherings are not allowed, while outdoor gatherings are capped at five. It’s strongly recommended people stick to their own households and socializing is not considered essential.

People who live alone are still allowed to interact with one other household.

Only a few people stroll the area connecting the Rideau Centre mall to the ByWard Maket area in downtown Ottawa on Jan. 14, during Ontario’s stay-at-home order. (Francis Ferland/CBC)

Students in areas covered by four of eastern Ontario’s six health units can return to the classroom, but not in Ottawa or the area covered by the Eastern Ontario Health Unit (EOHU).

Most outdoor recreation venues remain open, although Ottawa has closed one of the most popular sledding hills. The Rideau Canal Skateway is expected to open this week under pandemic rules.

In-person shopping is limited to essential businesses. Others can offer pickup and delivery.

The lockdown rules are in place until at least Feb. 11. Health officials say there are signs they have slowed COVID-19’s spread and there’s been talk about what it will take to lift them.

WATCH | Where the lopsided economic impact of COVID-19 goes from here:

More than a million Canadians are still under- or unemployed as a result of COVID-19, but the crisis also allowed others, who were easily able to work from home, save more money. 2:34

In western Quebec, residents are also being asked to stay home unless it’s essential and not see anyone they don’t live with to ease the “very critical” load on hospitals and avoid more delayed surgeries.

An exception for people living alone allows them to exclusively visit one other home.

Quebec’s 8 p.m. to 5 a.m. curfew is now in effect, with fines of up to $6,000 for breaking the rules.

The province has shut down non-essential businesses, but has brought students back to classrooms. Like in Ontario, travel from one region of Quebec to another is discouraged.

Those rules are in place until Feb. 8.

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Robin Andrew’s photography business is not keeping her very busy, during the pandemic. So she decided to create a 30-day Winter Play Challenge to bring some fun to herself – and other people feeling the stay-at-home winter blahs these days. 6:34

Distancing and isolating

The novel coronavirus primarily spreads through droplets when an infected person speaks, coughs, sneezes, or breathes onto someone or something. These droplets can hang in the air.

People can be contagious without symptoms.

This means it’s important to take precautions like staying home while symptomatic, keeping hands and frequently touched surfaces clean and maintaining distance from anyone you don’t live with — even with a mask on.

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Ben Lacroix launched a delivery app called “Getit Local.” The app charges businesses less than bigger food delivery services like Uber Eats and Skip the dishes 5:32

Masks, preferably with three layers, are mandatory in indoor public settings in Ontario and Quebec.

OPH says residents should also wear masks outside their homes whenever possible.

A person walks their dog in Major’s Hill Park on Jan. 25, during the COVID-19 pandemic. (Andrew Lee/CBC)

Anyone with COVID-19 symptoms should self-isolate, as should those who’ve been ordered to do so by their public health unit. The length varies in Ontario and Quebec.

Health Canada recommends older adults and people with underlying medical conditions and/or weakened immune systems stay home as much as possible and get friends and family to help with errands.

Anyone returning to Canada must go straight home and stay there for 14 days. Air travellers have to show recent proof of a negative COVID-19 test.

WATCH | Federal government considering more rules around international travel:

The federal government keeps hinting at stricter travel restrictions to curb the spread of new coronavirus variants inside Canada. 1:58

Symptoms and vaccines

COVID-19 can range from a cold-like illness to a severe lung infection, with common symptoms including fever, a cough, vomiting and loss of taste or smell. Children can develop a rash.

If you have severe symptoms, call 911.

Mental health can also be affected by the pandemic, and resources are available to help.

WATCH | Are there pandemic habits worth keeping?

Canadians have all adapted to change to some degree since the pandemic started one year ago. Four Canadians reflect on whether some of those changes will be worth keeping after it’s over. 7:11

COVID-19 vaccines have started being given to health-care workers and long-term care residents in most of the region. Renfrew County expects its first doses in early February.

Local health units have said they’ve given more than 33,600 doses, including about 23,900 in Ottawa and more than 8,400 in western Quebec. 

The fact Pfizer is temporarily slowing its vaccine production to expand its factory, however, means some jurisdictions can’t guarantee people will get the necessary second dose three weeks after the first. It may take four to six weeks.

Ontario is giving its available doses to care home residents and delaying them for health-care workers.

Its campaign is still expected to expand to priority groups such as older adults and essential workers in March or April, with vaccines widely available in August.

Ottawa believes it can have nearly 700,000 residents vaccinated by then.

Quebec is also giving a single dose to as many people as possible, starting with people in care homes and health-care workers, then remote communities, then older adults and essential workers and finally the general public.

Before Pfizer’s announcement, the province said people would get their second dose within 90 days.

It has had to delay vaccinating people in private seniors’ homes.

Where to get tested

In eastern Ontario:

Anyone seeking a test should book an appointment.

Ontario recommends only getting tested if you have symptoms, if you’ve been told to by your health unit or the province, or if you fit certain other criteria.

The KFL&A health unit says people that have left southeastern Ontario or been in contact with someone who has should get a test as they track one of the new COVID-19 variants.

People without symptoms but part of the province’s targeted testing strategy can make an appointment at select pharmacies. Travellers who need a test have very few local options to pay for one.

Ottawa has 10 permanent test sites, with mobile sites wherever demand is particularly high.

A person inside Rideau station on OC Transpo’s Confederation Line Jan. 25, 2021. (Andrew Lee/CBC)

The Eastern Ontario Health Unit has sites in Alexandria, Casselman, Cornwall, Hawkesbury, Rockland and Winchester.

People can arrange a test in Picton over the phone or Bancroft, Belleville and Trenton, where online booking is preferred.

The Leeds, Grenville and Lanark health unit has permanent sites in Almonte, Brockville, Kemptville and Smiths Falls and a mobile clinic.

Kingston’s main test site is at the Beechgrove Complex, another is in Napanee.

Renfrew County test clinic locations are posted weekly. Residents can also call their family doctor or 1-844-727-6404 with health questions.

In western Quebec:

Tests are strongly recommended for people with symptoms and their contacts.

Outaouais residents can make an appointment in Gatineau at 135 blvd. Saint-Raymond or 617 ave. Buckingham. They can check the wait time for the Saint-Raymond site.

There are recurring clinics by appointment in communities such as Maniwaki, Fort-Coulonge and Petite-Nation.

Call 1-877-644-4545 with questions, including if walk-in testing is available nearby.

First Nations, Inuit and Métis:

Akwesasne has had more than 140 residents test positive on the Canadian side of the border and six deaths. More than 280 people have tested positive across the community.

Its curfew from 11 p.m. to 5 a.m. is back and it has a COVID-19 test site by appointment only.

Anyone returning to the community on the Canadian side of the international border who’s been farther than 160 kilometres away — or visited Montreal — for non-essential reasons is asked to self-isolate for 14 days.

Kitigan Zibi logged its first case in mid-December and has had a total of 20. The Mohawks of the Bay of Quinte had their only confirmed case in November.

People in Pikwakanagan can book a COVID-19 test by calling 613-625-2259. Anyone in Tyendinaga who’s interested in a test can call 613-967-3603.

Inuit in Ottawa can call the Akausivik Inuit Family Health Team at 613-740-0999 for service, including testing, in Inuktitut or English on weekdays.

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