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LeBron James, Pat Riley put legacies on the line in NBA Finals – Sportsnet.ca

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Decades of NBA lore are built on rivalries — epic, titanic, ego-driven clashes that lend context, subtext and the weight of history to what are otherwise just games.

People pay for that stuff, and the league and its players have cashed in, with money spilling in so quickly that it can barely be counted, let alone spent.

It’s good versus evil; pride and prejudice, and pride going before the fall. It’s Celtics-Lakers; Bird-Magic; Michael vs. the Pistons, Shaq vs. Kobe, KD vs. the Warriors and LeBron over everyone.

Some of it is straight out of the Vince McMahon playbook: storylines that keep the plot twisting through never-ending winters until games that matter finally arrive, at which point the hype machine kicks it up another notch.

If there is a podcasting odd couple, this might be it. Donnovan Bennett and JD Bunkis don’t agree on much, but you’ll agree this is the best Toronto Raptors podcast going.

But some of it is real. Some of it is based on men of giant accomplishments and massive, never-satiated ambitions coming together and pulling apart like tectonic plates on ephedrine, the league’s foundations quaking along the way.

So yeah, the Miami Heat facing the Los Angeles Lakers has some juice to it.

This time it’s not an on-court rivalry that lends the final series of the NBA’s most unusual season its weight — though on paper the young, upstart Heat testing themselves against LeBron James and his insta-dynasty Lakers has all the ingredients to make it suitably delicious.

But what could make it memorable and a new plot point in the league’s decades-long drama is the way it pits two of sport’s most significant, preening, powerful, proud and successful figures against one another.

Heat president Pat Riley is 75 and his Goodfellas-inspired, slicked-back hair has long gone gray. But even in the bubble and wearing a mask, behind a glass partition, he has a presence. When current Heat star Jimmy Butler is looking for approval, he looks up into the stands, devoid of fans, for a post-game thumbs up from Riley. The Heat figurehead is the former Lakers role player turned coach turned executive turned living legend, the one who rode shotgun for Jerry West on the floor; earned Magic Johnson’s trust from the bench before pushing him too far and losing that war of wills after five championships.

Cast out from L.A., Riley perfected bully ball with the New York Knicks in the 90s, very nearly toppling Jordan in the process, before bolting for Miami, where he has somehow fused L.A. cool with New York edge, South Florida weather and no state income tax to create an NBA destination out of almost nothing.

It was Riley’s presence that attracted James after the kid from Akron was all grown up and looking to leave home. Riley plunked down a bag with the nine championships he’d won as a player, coach and executive and promised James he’d win a bunch more if they joined forces in Miami. James, without a title to show for seven years as a good soldier in Cleveland, followed the sun.

It was a perfect union – the world’s greatest player with the NBA’s most recognized superstar whisperer; the coolest, most gangster executive in the game with one more legend to pour his wisdom into. But after four Finals appearances and two championships, James was ready to graduate.

Pat Riley is Pat Riley because he’s his own man. He followed his basketball vision and in Miami created something in his image. “Heat Culture” is Riley: toughness, accountability, loyalty and no compromises.

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In year 17 of his NBA career, LeBron James is still peaking up to his prime

September 28 2020

But James took his lessons and wanted to improvise, play his own tune and win on his terms. When James left Miami to go back to Cleveland, he was following his own muse, looking to close his own circle and bring a championship back to the most un-Miami place in the league — taking what he learned and bringing it home.

Riley wasn’t having it. He wasn’t used to people saying “No” to him, let alone South Beach. For a moment he lost his cool. He lashed out.

“This stuff is hard. And you go to stay together, if you’ve got the guts,” he said after the Heatles had come up short against the San Antonio Spurs in 2014, triggering the break-up, and plenty of hard feelings. “And you don’t find the first door and run out of it.”

It was a ridiculous thing to say. All James was doing was taking his career into his own hands, launching himself on a trajectory few athletes in any sport have ever aspired to, let alone pulled off. James went back to Cleveland and completed one of the greatest stories in all of sports – bringing a title to his (adjacent) hometown after 52 years of being kicked around or forgotten by the coastal elites. He engineered a comeback from 3-1 against the Golden State Warriors, one of the greatest teams in NBA history. Along the way, James found his voice as a philanthropist and an activist — and proved that he didn’t need Pat Riley to be the primary figure in the NBA.

Riley couldn’t help but be chastened.

“I had two to three days of tremendous anger (after James left),” Riley told Ian Thomsen in 2018’s “The Soul of Basketball,” acknowledging that he hadn’t spoken with James since.

“I was absolutely livid, which I expressed to myself and my closest friends. My beautiful plan all of a sudden came crashing down. That team in 10 years could have won five or six championships.

“But I get it. I get the whole chronicle of (LeBron’s) life.

“While there may have been some carnage always left behind when he made these kinds of moves, in Cleveland and also in Miami, he did the right thing,” Riley told Thompson. “I just finally came to accept the realization that he and his family said, ‘You’ll never, ever be accepted back in your hometown if you don’t go back to try to win a title. Otherwise someday you’ll go back there and have the scarlet letter on your back. You’ll be the greatest player in the history of mankind, but back there, nobody’s really going to accept you.’”

In the moments before Game 7 in 2016, Riley reached out to James, via text: “Win this and be free.”

James never responded. He didn’t need Riley’s affirmation, but from the winner’s circle, he let on the vindication his third title provided.

“When I decided to leave Miami — I’m not going to name any names, I can’t do that — but there were some people that I trusted and built relationships with in those four years (who) told me I was making the biggest mistake of my career,” James told ESPN at the time.

“And that s— hurt me. And I know it was an emotional time that they told me that because I was leaving. They just told me it was the biggest mistake I was making in my career. And that right there was my motivation.”

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Having paid his debt to Cleveland, James eventually set out to make one more bold move in a career defined by them, leaving to join the Lakers in the summer of 2018, all while making a masterful long play to recruit the greatest teammate of his career, Anthony Davis.

After a season in limbo, it has worked out perfectly. The Lakers have been the best team in the West all year and have looked stronger as the playoffs have gone on.

But while Riley may have begun to show his age in the decade since he brought James to Miami as the centrepiece of what he thought would be a dynasty that would challenge the Lakers’ historical hegemony, he hasn’t lost any of his edge.

Since James left, Riley has been rebuilding on the fly: adding, positioning, developing and drafting. This past off-season he pounced and found a new soulmate in Jimmy Butler to lead his hand-picked crew of young talent.

The Heat have grown before everyone’s eyes, including Riley’s, as he looks down approvingly from behind his mask.

Now one more test: will Riley’s new team, built in James’ wake, be able to hand James one more bitter Finals disappointment, a seventh loss — this time to his former mentor — obscuring his three championships?

Or will James have the last laugh, winning his fourth title with his third team and proving that Riley needed him more than the other way around?

There are legacies at stake, and history, and two of the NBA’s proudest, vainest and most successful characters are awaiting one more chapter to be written.

But only one of them is one the floor. Advantage, LeBron.

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Mighty Heart, horse with N.S. connection, falls short in bid for Canadian Triple Crown – CBC.ca

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Mighty Heart, the one-eyed colt with a Nova Scotia connection, narrowly missed winning the OLG Canadian Triple Crown on Saturday.

“It’s been a crazy journey,” Cape Breton’s Siobhan Brown, Mighty Heart’s groom, said from Toronto before the Breeders’ Stakes race, the third jewel of the Triple Crown.

The three-year-old horse took an early lead at the Woodbine Racetrack in Toronto, but fell short after he ran out of steam, finishing seventh.

His stablemate, Belichick, captured the title instead.

Mighty Heart is held outside trainer Josie Carroll’s stable by exercise rider Des McMahon. (Chris Young/The Canadian Press)

Mighty Heart, nicknamed Willie, lost his left eye in a paddock accident when he was just two weeks old — but he’s never let that stop him.

Last month, he won the Queen’s Plate, the opening leg of the Triple Crown with a winning time of 2:01.98, the second-fastest since 1957. He went on to capture the second jewel, the Prince of Wales Stakes, only a couple weeks later.

If he had won the Breeders’ Stakes, he would become the first horse since Wando in 2003 to capture the Triple Crown — and the first to do it with one eye.

Mighty Heart was only two weeks old when he lost his left eye in a paddock accident. (Submitted by Siobhan Brown)

Brown has been Mighty Heart’s groom since last year. She said she understands Mighty Heart’s disability because she has epilepsy.

“I totally get, you know, not being all there so we just kind of bonded from that and it’s been really nice,” she said.

But she said it was his personality, sense of humour and his kindness that made her want to be his groom.

Mighty Heart, a one-eyed thoroughbred racing horse, is hoping to capture the Canadian Triple Crown. The colt, which lost an eye in a paddock accident at a young age, would be only the eighth horse in more than 60 years to win the coveted prize. Greg Ross has more. 1:51

“He just needs some love and he’s one of those [horses] that needs that confidence boost and time and patience,” she said. 

“… And the more I’ve worked with him now, I’ve just absolutely fallen in love with him.”

Earlier Saturday, Brown said her family back home in Nova Scotia and New Brunswick were rooting for Mighty Heart.

“It’s so amazing to see such a community come together for something that nobody really knew anything about, because we don’t have thoroughbred racing at home.” 

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UFC 254 results: Robert Whittaker outstrikes Jared Cannonier to win unanimous decision – MMA Fighting

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Robert Whittaker proved yet again at UFC 254 why he’s the No. 1 ranked middleweight contender in the world.

The former champion put on a technical striking showcase to avoid Jared Cannonier’s power for the better part of all three rounds before earning a unanimous decision in the co-main event on Fight Island. The judges all scored the fight 29-28 with Whittaker earning his second straight win after defeating Darren Till back in July.

“I’m very happy,” Whittaker said. “Obviously we got the result we wanted. It was a good fight, he’s a tough guy.”

The middleweight clash was really a display of speed and accuracy against a whole lot of power as Whittaker was fast with his hands and feet while Cannonier was looking for the knockout with almost every shot thrown. While Whittaker was connecting with better volume, Cannonier fired back with a series of thudding leg kicks that left a serious mark behind the former champion’s knee.

As time passed, Whittaker really started to establish his lead jab, which Cannonier was struggling to avoid. Whittaker continuously flicked out the jab and the straight punches were giving Cannonier problems as he looked for a way to counter.

While the leg kicks were still paying dividends for Cannonier, he just couldn’t keep up with Whittaker’s pace where he was throwing and connecting with much more regularity.

With Cannonier trying to find an answer to the punches, Whittaker set up a beautiful combination that he capped off with a staggering head kick. The shot glanced off Cannonier’s head and he was immediately rattled but he managed to survive the subsequent onslaught.

As the final round was coming to a close, Cannonier cracked Whittaker with a hard punch that wobbled the former champion momentarily but he wasn’t able to capitalize. The fight ended with both fighters launching shots at each other as the middleweights left everything in the cage.

After losing his title to Israel Adesanya almost exactly one year ago, Whittaker has now dispatched two top ranked middleweights in a row. With these past pair of performances, Whittaker may be looking at a rematch with Adesanya once both fighters are ready to return in 2021.

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Time check! Khabib Nurmagomedov, Justin Gaethje will fight at UFC 254 around 4:15 p.m. ET today – MMA Mania

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We are just hours away from one of the biggest lightweight battles in recent UFC history as undefeated champion Khabib Nurmagomedov meets interim titleholder Justin Gaethje for the undisputed belt this afternoon (Sat., Oct. 24, 2020) at UFC 254 live on ESPN+ PPV from inside Flash Forum on “Fight Island” in Abu Dhabi.

Nurmagomedov, who is currently 12-0 in UFC competition, is hoping to push his overall MMA record to 29-0 with a win over “Highlight.” It won’t be easy, though, even for a dominant champion like Khabib. That’s because “Eagle” will be competing for the first time in over 13 months, the first time without his father by his side, and the first time in front of no fans. It will be a shock to say the least, but one that Nurmagomedov should be able to handle.

Gaethje, who destroyed Tony Ferguson this past May to claim the interim strap, is hoping to pull off the biggest upset in recent UFC history. The “Most Violent Man in the Sport” has all the ingredients to take it to Khabib and give him his toughest test to date, but it’s all going to come down to whether or not Gaethje can keep his back off the cage and feet on the ground. If he can do that and utilize his elite collegiate wrestling background then maybe Gaethje can actually pull it off.

It will be a lightweight title fight for the ages, but when exactly should fight fans expect Khabib and Gaethje to step inside of the cage on a loaded PPV card smack dab in the middle of the day?

With five other fights taking place on the PPV main card starting at 2:00 p.m. ET, Khabib vs. Gaethje is likely to begin sometime around 4:30 p.m. ET. The co-main event will showcase a middleweight scrap between former UFC champion Robert Whittaker and rising contender Jared Cannonier, which could very well end in spectacular fashion early. Mix in a heavyweight class between Alexander Volkov and Walt Harris, as well as a rematch between light heavyweight finishers Magomed Ankalaev and Ion Cutelaba, and UFC 254 might move along quicker than anticipated.

If things run early/late Mania will be sure to provide an updated start time for today’s Khabib vs. Gaethje main event.

MMAmania.com will deliver LIVE round-by-round, blow-by-blow coverage of the entire UFC 254 fight card RIGHT HERE, starting with the ESPN+ “Prelims” matches online, which are scheduled to begin at 11:00 a.m. ET, then the remaining undercard balance on ESPN+/ESPN2 at 12 p.m. ET, before the PPV main card start time at 2 p.m. ET on ESPN+.

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