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Letter: Piece about media was all about politics – Grand Forks Herald

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In an opinion piece two weeks ago, R.J. Ogaard claimed the left-wing media was running a smear campaign on President Trump, but at the same time, the letter he wrote was just that – a smear piece.

He would have you believe the mainstream news reporting is all highly biased garbage. Fortunately, this is just not true. Countless studies have investigated and found that news sources such as the AP, Bloomberg, Reuters, National Public Radio, ABC News, CBS news, Politico, The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, and the Los Angeles Times generally report factual and responsible news. Some of these sources, like Politico, may be a bit liberal. Others, like the Wall Street Journal may be a bit conservative. Even so, they are reliable sources of information.

Ogaard claims that media outlets like the above are ignoring the facts and just lashing out at Trump because they don’t like him. He wrote, “Those same news sources are now scapegoating Trump, with a frame that he did not respond to COVID-19 quickly enough.” Well, it’s a fact that Trump’s response was too little too late. In late January, Trump said, “We have it totally under control. It’s one person coming in from China.” In late February, just when Italy was locking down entire cities, Trump declared, “The Coronavirus is very much under control in the USA.” Clearly it wasn’t under control then, it still isn’t now, and these are critical issues that ought to be in the news.

One blatant omission from Ogaard’s piece is any mention of conservative media. He writes that corporate media is after three things: “Power. Money. Status.” Does that include Fox News? What about the Grand Forks Herald? He doesn’t say, and that highlights a big problem in his letter.

He says we should distrust corporate media, except for a few companies – the ones that match his extreme political views.

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A break from politics | The Blade – Toledo Blade

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Should Politics Be On The Discussion Menu On Thanksgiving? Experts Weigh In – CBS New York

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NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) — Getting ready to gather virtually with family on Thanksgiving?

How will you navigate inevitable conversations about the still-contentious election?

Is politics simply to be avoided? Can it be?

Those were the days, remembered Sheri Baker of Old Westbury. Thanksgiving will look very different this year with a giant family Zoom chat, but there are some things that won’t be different.

“We have learned sort of the hard way that there are some topics when it comes to politics that are better left unsaid in order to keep the holidays happy,” Baker told CBS2’s Carolyn Gusoff on Wednesday.

CORONAVIRUS PANDEMIC

Emotions are still running high following the the election, splitting not only the country, but families.

“I think our country is more divided than ever.

“It’s terrible,” another person said.

MOREJoe Biden Introduces New Members Of National Security, Foreign Policy Teams

And as we gather, even virtually, should politics be banned from Thanksgiving?

“What I do recommend is speaking to family in advance and having a plan,” said Dr. Amanda Fialk, chief of clinical services at the DORM, a treatment community in New York City for young adults.

Fialk said to set parameters ahead of time to either avoid politics or limit when it may be discussed.

“I think it’s useful to ask questions of them rather than to speak at them and make statements,” Fialk said.

And take a timeout when you’re simply not hearing one another.

“When it’s no longer productive, end it. And that doesn’t mean end it forever. That just means end it for right now,” Fialk said.

MOREGeneral Services Administration Tells Biden Team It Can Begin Formal Transition Process

Or take a cue from couples therapy techniques to help heal relationships with those on the other side of the political divide.

“We are an American family. We sit a the same table and if we expel people from the table because of their political views we will lose our ability to function as a country,” said family therapist Bill Doherty, co-founder of Braver Angels.

“I think everybody’s aim is to try to do their part, to keep healthy, keep safe, protect our friends and family and strangers, so we can get through this,” Baker added.

Baker said she plans to focus on being thankful, to count our blessings, not our differences.

MORE FROM CBS NEW YORK

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Politics Briefing: Ontario Auditor-General slams province’s pandemic response – The Globe and Mail

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Hello,

Ontario Auditor-General Bonnie Lysyk has slammed the provincial government’s handling of the COVID-19 pandemic.

In a special report, Ms. Lysyk said, among other flaws, the “command table” of experts handling the crisis ballooned from 21 to 500 people and did not meet for a video conference until July.

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The Auditor-General said the province had failed to learn its lessons from the 2003 SARS crisis.

This is the daily Politics Briefing newsletter, written by Chris Hannay. It is available exclusively to our digital subscribers. If you’re reading this on the web, subscribers can sign up for the Politics newsletter and more than 20 others on our newsletter signup page. Have any feedback? Let us know what you think.

TODAY’S HEADLINES

John McCallum, the former Liberal minister and ambassador to China who was dismissed in 2019, says Canada does not need a registry of foreign agents, similar to ones created in the United States and Australia.

Relatives of the Canadian victims of a Boeing 737 Max crash are urging the government to be extremely careful before clearing the plane for flying again.

The Liberal government has given notice it will table a bill to legalize single-game sports betting. A private member’s bill to legalize the practice sailed through the House in 2013, but stalled in the Senate before it could become law.

As Alberta sees rates of COVID-19 soar, the provincial government is enacting new lockdowns that still allow many businesses to operate.

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And Politico has a fascinating deep dive into the Trump campaign’s failed efforts to overturn the election results in Michigan, a state he lost by 154,000 votes — and the state Republicans who nevertheless supported the fraudulent claims of fraud.

Andrew Coyne (The Globe and Mail) on conspiracy theories about “The Great Reset”: “It would be of the greatest assistance in dispelling populist fears of shadowy globalist plots for world domination if the objects of their paranoia did not so often carry on like cackling Bond villains.”

André Picard (The Globe and Mail) on why Alberta’s new lockdown measures are inadequate: “What we saw Tuesday was inaction posing as action, a quasi-libertarian Premier bending over backward to do nothing while pretending otherwise.”

Jillian Kohler and Jonathan Cushing (The Globe and Mail) on what the pandemic means for pharmaceutical companies: “In the wake of the encouraging news about COVID-19 vaccine trials from Pfizer/BioNTech, Moderna and AstraZeneca, global attention is on pharmaceutical companies like never before. But in the understandable excitement, the companies in the spotlight risk overlooking a major opportunity: the chance to prioritize transparency and global health over profits, and build their credibility.”

Got a news tip that you’d like us to look into? E-mail us at tips@globeandmail.com. Need to share documents securely? Reach out via SecureDrop

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