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Levi Nelson art on display in downtown Pemberton – Pique Newsmagazine

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Hydro boxes in Pemberton just got a lot more exciting.

Pieces by Levi Nelson, a Lil’wat Nation artist in his last year at Emily Carr University of Art and Design, are now installed on hydro boxes along Portage Road and on the utility box at the Downtown Community Barn.

“We are incredibly grateful and honoured that Levi shared his artwork with us,” the Village of Pemberton said on a Facebook post on Friday, June 5.

Nelson’s work has been exhibited at the Talking Stick Festival, the Museum of Anthropology, North Vancouver City Art Scape, and the Emily Carr University of Art & Design Aboriginal Student Art Show. He also recently became the first Lil’wat Nation artist to have a piece in the Audain Art Museum’s permanent collection.

The recent hydro box wraps were made possible thanks to a contribution from BC Hydro’s beautification fund.

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Whitehorse artist's milk jug dress aims to inspire people to find art in recycling – CBC.ca

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Leslie Leong says it’s not a practical dress, “but it is wearable.”

At this week’s “Artist in the Window” at the Yukon Artists @ Work gallery in Whitehorse, Leong’s creating a dress out of milk jugs.

“I like to use recycled materials because I feel like we have plenty of good materials already in the world,” she explained. “We don’t need new stuff — we should use what we’ve got.”

Leong said she first got the idea to make a milk jug gown when she was invited to do an artist in residence presentation at the Sewing Through a Landscape gala in Haines Junction. 

Leong expects her second milk jug dress to take about a week to put together. (Submitted by Nicole Bauberger)

Model Lyn Fabio went on to wear the gown in a fashion show, and it was also featured in a performance by Teslin actor and playwright Melaina Sheldon where it was worn with a raven mask.

However, over the wintertime, Leong lost the dress while driving home from an art fair.

“I loaded up the truck and it blew away,” she said. “I tried to find it; I spent hours looking everywhere.”

Leong put the word out, hoping someone would return it — or, she joked, best case scenario she’d find someone “walking around town in it.” But it never showed up.

Now, months later, Leong said it was time to take a stab at “version two.”

Crafting the perfect gown

To build the milk jug dress, Leong said she starts by using a mannequin as a rough guide.

From there, she cuts the milk jugs into flat panels and attaches them all together, with each piece having at least four pop rivets in it to attach to the other pieces.

At that point, she said sewing patterns are quite useful. Because the panels are see-through, the patterns are often easy to follow, she explained.

“It’s beautiful material — and it bends too,” Leong said, noting it’s similar to gift wrapping ribbon.

Environmental concerns have influenced Leong’s artmaking for the last 15 years. She made her first necklace from upcycled computer parts in 2005. (Submitted by Nicole Bauberger)

New inspiration during pandemic

Leong said the COVID-19 pandemic has been tough on her as an artist. 

Right before the pandemic hit, she had just opened an art exhibit, only to have it closed shortly after. 

Now that things are slowly reopening, Leong admitted — like many others during this time — finding motivation can be challenging. 

However, being able to showcase her talents in this new way brings her comfort.

“It is good to have this,” Leong said. “It’s really nice to have something to be inspired by.”

Leong will be working on her milk jug dress in the gallery window of Yukon Artists @ Work on Fourth Avenue from Wednesday to Friday between 11 a.m. and 2 p.m.

Leong is working on the milk jug dress alongside an installation of other works made of recycled materials. This ‘electric powered plant’ uses pop bottles, egg cartons and milk jugs. (Submitted by Nicole Bauberger)

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Whyte Avenue Art Walk goes on display – CTV News

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EDMONTON —
The Whyte Avenue Art Walk is taking a creative approach to comply with public health guidelines while still displaying local artists’ work.

For the last 24 years, Art Walk has been an outdoor event, with artists lined up along Whyte Avenue sidewalks showcasing their work, but COVID-19 restrictions have challenged organizers to come up with an alternative.

This year, the 25th anniversary of the event, art work from 22 artists will be displayed in the windows of 18 Old Strathcona businesses from July 10 to 30.

The event will also include a virtual aspect, maps and information are on the Art Walk website, and people can use the hashtag #YegArtWalk to find artist video features, video demonstrations and information about past and present Art Walk artists.

The hashtag #YegArtForSale can also be used to connect buyers with artists if they wish to make a purchase.

The 25th Whyte Avenue Art Walk starts Friday on Whyte Avenue from 101 Street to 108 Street.

For more information on the event, click here.

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Jae Sterling explores race, violence, sexuality and Calgary with debut art exhibit – Calgary Herald

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It would be tempting to assume the title of Jae Sterling’s first art exhibit, Riding Horses with White Men, is a not-so-subtle reference to a young Jamaican man’s response to Calgary and its most prominent cultural event. 

Sterling says the paintings are definitely inspired by a sense of isolation and fish-out-of-water feeling he has had since arriving from Jamaica in 2009 as a 19-year-old. But while the title and timing of the exhibit, which opens Thursday during what would have traditionally been the height of Stampede fever, may suggest a direct correlation to the Greatest Outdoor Show on Earth, Sterling says the scope is much broader.

Artist Jae Sterling. Photos by Esther Cho. /jpg

“It’s about Calgary and about my experience here in Calgary, so I guess the Stampede ties into it,” says Sterling. “But it’s about my entire experience here. And, funny enough, (the Stampede) was not that foreign to me. That’s the catch. I’m from Jamaica, I come from an island, and I came to Calgary. But I did grow up on farmland in Jamaica. My parents, my grandparents, we all grew up on farmland. It’s really not that foreign to me, that whole Stampede thing. But what is foreign to me is to see it in this setting.”

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