adplus-dvertising
Connect with us

Health

Local Alzheimer Society to host conversations around aging and memory loss during Alzheimer’s Awareness Month

Published

 on

The Alzheimer Society of Huron Perth is hosting several conversations and programs focused around aging and memory loss as part of Alzheimer’s Awareness Month in January.

As part of Alzheimer’s Awareness Month, the Alzheimer Society of Huron Perth is inviting Stratford-area residents to explore the topics of aging and memory loss through different conversations and programs being hosted locally and virtually in the coming weeks.

Alzheimer Society staff and guest speakers are using this year’s month to share information on how aging can naturally affect memory and other cognitive abilities and what people can do to keep their memories sharp.

On Jan. 24 at 1:30 p.m., Dr. Alexandrea Peel, a local geriatrician who specializes in the aging process, will host a virtual presentation on Zoom on important topics facing seniors. While the presentation will include information on specific topics like new medications and knowing when to stop driving, it will also conclude with an expansive question-and-answer period to allow participants to ask about anything related to aging and memory loss.

300x250x1

“We’re actually lucky to have a geriatrician in Huron-Perth,” said Alzheimer Society Huron Perth public education co-ordinator Jeanette Sears. “There’s many places in Ontario where they don’t have as much access to a geriatrician as we do here.”

Registration for the free session is available at us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZYkceqpqDMiGddliVcijjKLekOO3ZjkSi96. For participants who would like to ask questions while maintaining their privacy, they can emailAlzheimer Society Huron Perth public education co-ordinator Christy Bannerman at christyb@alzhp.ca or call 519-271-1910.

Starting on Jan. 31, the local Alzheimer Society will be expanding its four-week Online Memory and Aging program to residents of Perth County, Stratford and St. Marys. Designed by medical experts for anyone experiencing natural, age-related changes in memory, participants will meet for weekly Zoom session for four consecutive Tuesdays starting on Jan. 31 from 1:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. These sessions focus on what memory is, how it changes with age and when to be concerned. Participants will also learn how to make healthy brain lifestyle choices and employ practical memory strategies.

“It’s for anybody. You don’t have to have a diagnosis of dementia. It’s really geared towards seniors interested in learning more about how their memory is changing.  … The biggest takeaway from this course is that people actually build confidence. So many times, when people notice their memory change, they’re scared to say anything because they’re scared they’re the only one noticing those changes. So it’s such a relief to be in a group of people where everybody’s saying, ‘Oh yeah, I’ve experienced that too,’” Sears said.

Residents can register for the Online Memory and Aging program by visiting us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZUsd-Cupj0jG9KwjiWiNl0lzdNsb6ucEUa0.

Also part of Alzheimer’s Awareness Month, Bannerman is hosting a three-part series at the Stratford Public Library on brain health. The first in-person session, Forgetfulness vs. the Big A: How to Tell the Difference, was held Jan. 13 and explored the differences between the early signs of Alzheimer’s and memory loss resulting from natural aging. Those who missed the first session are still encouraged to attend the remaining two sessions in Stratford: Games and Recipes for Optimizing Brain Health at 2 p.m. on Jan. 20 and Research and Medical Advances in Brain Health at 2 p.m. on Jan. 27.

For more information on the Alzheimer’s Awareness Month events at the library and other libraries across Perth County, check the events calendar on your local library’s website.

While the local programs and events are intended to provide information and education on dementia, aging and natural memory loss to the public, Sears also stressed the importance of connecting with the local Alzheimer Society for those who have been diagnosed with dementia or Alzheimer’s. Through the society, patients and their families can access helpful resources and information, a diverse range of programs and services to help strengthen brain health and teach coping strategies, and both social and in-home recreation programs.

For more information, visit alzheimer.ca/perth/en.

gsimmons@postmedia.com

728x90x4

Source link

Continue Reading

Health

Good Dental Health Essential in Sickle Cell Anemia, Study Finds |… – Sickle Cell Anemia News

Published

 on


Good oral health is essential in people with sickle cell anemia (SCA), according to a new study from Saudi Arabia that found that several disease-causing bacteria species — including Enterobacteriaceae — were significantly more abundant in a group of patients with poorer dental health than in those with better oral care.

“A healthy mouth has a balance of bacteria, but inadequate oral health narrows the range of bacteria, resulting in oral dysbiosis, a state in which beneficial bacteria decrease and potentially pathogenic [disease-causing] bacteria increase,” the researchers wrote.

The findings also indicated that patients with low levels of hemoglobin F — a type of hemoglobin normally produced during fetal development — had a significantly higher prevalence of harmful bacteria species than those who had higher levels of the protein.

300x250x1

“Our data further emphasise the importance of routine oral hygiene visits for patients with SCA,” the team wrote, adding, “This is especially important for patients with SCA and low [hemoglobin F], who have a higher probability of hospitalisation and clinical complications compared to patients with SCA and high [hemoglobin F].”

The research’s findings were reported in “Oral microbiota analyses of Saudi sickle cell anemics with dental caries,” a study published in the International Dental Journal

Recommended Reading

Examining good versus poor dental health in SCA

Sickle cell disease (SCD) is caused by mutations in the HBB gene that lead to the production of a faulty version of hemoglobin, the protein in red blood cells that is responsible for carrying oxygen through the body. This faulty version is called hemoglobin S.

People with sickle cell anemia or SCA, the most common and often the most severe form of SCD, have two faulty gene copies encoding hemoglobin S.

Complications of dental caries or tooth decay, including acute pain, are often observed in patients with SCA — and have been associated with poor quality of life.

In a healthy mouth, different bacteria species co-exist in a balanced ratio. However, in cases of inadequate oral health, the number of beneficial bacteria decreases, while that of potentially harmful ones increases. This can lead to dental caries, which often result in cavities and other oral health problems.

“Although ample evidence indicates a causative correlation between the disruption of the oral [bacteria] and dental caries, the effect in SCA has not been investigated,” the researchers wrote.

Now, a team from the Netherlands and Saudi Arabia conducted a study to examine oral bacteria composition in people with SCA. Their aim was to compare bacteria species in patients with a high decayed, missing, and filled permanent teeth (DMTF) index — a measure of dental health — compared with others who had a low index.

In addition, they evaluated the effect of hemoglobin F levels on bacterial composition by comparing the profiles of patients with low and high levels of the protein. Fetal hemoglobin or hemoglobin F is considered a major modulator of disease severity in SCA.

This type of hemoglobin normally is found in fetuses and newborn babies, but is typically replaced by another hemoglobin variant after birth. However, hemoglobin F is more effective at transporting oxygen than its adult counterpart, and may, therefore, help to counteract the harmful effects of hemoglobin S on blood flow and oxygen transport.

In some individuals, the levels of hemoglobin F remain relatively high during childhood, and only start to decline later on in life, rather than immediately after birth.

Recommended Reading

hygiene, self-care

High levels of Enterobacteriaceae bacteria found

This new study was conducted in the Eastern Province of Saudi Arabia, where the disease is highly prevalent. It included 100 patients, ages 5–12, from whom saliva was collected.

Among the patients, 27 had high dental caries — reflected by a high DMTF index of five points or more — and 73 had low dental caries, indicated by a low DMTF index of four points or fewer.

The research team identified 416 bacteria species in the patients’ samples. When analyzing their prevalence, seven were found to be significantly more abundant in patients with a high DMTF index than in those with a low index.

In addition, eight bacteria species were found to be significantly more prevalent in patients with low hemoglobin F levels compared with those with high levels of the protein.

In particular, the Enterobacteriaceae bacteria species, which have been associated with severe infections and high rates of antibiotic resistance, were found in great abundance in both patient groups, being the most significantly abundant bacteria species among those with low levels of hemoglobin F. 

“It has been suggested that the presence of the Enterobacteriaceae species in the oral cavity is favoured when an individual’s immunity is compromised,” the researchers wrote, adding that “patients with SCA are immunocompromised.”

Overall, these findings indicate that Saudi SCA patients with poorer dental health and low levels of hemoglobin F have a higher predominance of harmful bacteria in their mouth.

Our data further emphasise the importance of routine oral hygiene visits for patients with SCA.

“Our results provide a valuable addition to the global microbiome reference data set in an underexamined community,” the researchers wrote, adding, “These efforts are essential and warranted given the scarcity of [bacteria composition] data in Middle Eastern populations.”

Nevertheless, a study with a large sample size evaluating how oral bacterial species can relate to dental caries in SCA patients is required, the team noted.

The researchers said their findings indicate the important of good dental health in people with sickle cell anemia, given that the bacteria species otherwise found “are thought to drive the development and progression of dental caries.”

Adblock test (Why?)

728x90x4

Source link

Continue Reading

Health

Good Oral Health Crucial in People with Sickle Cell Anemia, Study Finds – Oral Health

Published

 on


iStock

A new study from Saudi Arabia found that good dental health is vital for people with sickle cell anemia (SCA). The findings observed that multiple disease-causing bacteria were seen much more in the patients with poorer oral health than those with better oral health.

Patricia Valerio, PhD, noted, “The findings also indicated that patients with low levels of hemoglobin F – a type of hemoglobin normally produced during fetal development – had a significantly higher prevalence of harmful bacteria species than those who had higher levels of the protein.”

This research shows how important good oral hygiene is for patients with SCA and low hemoglobin F.

300x250x1

Read more about this study from Sickle Cell Disease News.


Sign up for Oral Health Group’s weekly e-newsletter to have news delivered straight to your inbox!

Adblock test (Why?)

728x90x4

Source link

Continue Reading

Health

Respiratory viruses on decline: Province – Brandon Sun – The Brandon Sun

Published

 on


Hospitalizations due to influenza, COVID-19 and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) have all decreased in Manitoba, according to the province’s latest epidemiological respiratory virus surveillance report.

Data for the week of Jan. 15 to Jan. 21 indicates this respiratory virus season may finally be nearing its end, after it began earlier than usual and caused surges of severe illness and hospitalizations, particularly among babies and toddlers.

There were two flu-related hospital admissions that week, none requiring intensive care, while the Influenza A test positivity rate fell to 0.8 per cent, compared with 1.9 per cent the previous week. No cases of Influenza B have been detected provincially yet this season.

300x250x1

There were 105 detected cases of RSV, with a weekly RSV test positivity rate of 8.3 per cent. The previous week, the test positivity rate for RSV was 8.7 per cent.

There were seven patients with COVID-19 in hospital, as well as three in intensive care. No new COVID deaths were reported, but the province retroactively updated its COVID-19 death toll. There were 15 deaths added to the total count last week, for an overall number of 316 Manitobans who lost their lives to COVID since this fall.

» Winnipeg Free Press

Adblock test (Why?)

728x90x4

Source link

Continue Reading

Trending