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Local groups relishing a return to the ice at Art Hauser Centre – paNOW

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Instructor Mark Odnokon told paNOW in previous years the camp goes for nine days and this year it will only go for five days from Aug. 10 to 14.

They’re allowed 30 participants on the ice at one time and that includes the instructors.

“We figured we had to try and at least do something just to get the kids out on the ice again and get them going or get them out of the house,” Odnokon said. “We’re fortunate that we work well with the city, we’ve had a good relationship there and they’ve been good and upfront about everything.”

Those who wish to participate in the camp can visit the website and check updated information such as a new schedule.

This year there will be no specific camps for goaltenders, defencemen or checking this year. Odnokon said these will be instructed during other ice sessions. Even though they didn’t want to remove those specific camps, they wanted to maximize the ice as much as they could.

“Those are specialized camps and we would love to do them, but I think what we’re looking at is just getting the kids on the ice,” he said.

The group has had lots of calls, texts and emails asking when the camp will begin.

“There’s people just really eager to get going so that encouraged us also,” he said. “If you don’t hear from anybody, you’re kind of going ‘oh geez should we even run this thing?’ but we’ve had a lot of interest again.”

Prince Albert Skating Club

Head coach of the Prince Albert Skating Club Carla Jenkins said starting on Aug. 17 they will have three hours a day of ice time from Monday to Friday for two weeks as a kickoff for their preseason for figure skaters.

“We haven’t had the go ahead yet for our other programs so we’re starting with our figure skaters, which is usually around the time we normally start with them,” Jenkins said.

Since the skaters have been off the ice for so long, they will be practicing a lot of the basics.

“A lot of technique, turns, edges, all kinds of basic stuff, stroking to get them back into shape,” she explained.

The figure skaters attending the camp will be anywhere from six-years-old to 17.

“We’re super excited, we didn’t know what to expect this year,” Jenkins said.

The club will have two different groups on the ice each day to make sure all the skaters have a chance to take part.

“We are just opening actually the online registration I believe will open the beginning of August,” she said.

Prince Albert Raiders

The Art Hauser Centre is of course the home of the Prince Albert Raiders.

Business manager for the club, Michael Scissons, said he wasn’t surprised to hear the ice would be going back in and the rink would be reopening.

“This is a regular time for the ice to be going back in because there is a bunch of camps,” he said. “I was excited to see that this is a positive step forward in a return to hockey for not only the Prince Albert Raiders but for all players in Prince Albert.”

He said the optimism about a return of the Western Hockey League season potentially in October has never failed. The WHL announced in June their Return to Play Protocol for the 2020/21 season is a target date of Oct. 2.

“The fact of the matter is everybody is doing everything they can to make sure we get on the ice as quickly as possible. To me it’s not a question of if, it’s just a matter of a question as to when,” Scissons said.

He explained the return to the ice for WHL teams will be up to the league but said if they’re going to start on Oct. 2 training could potentially start a couple weeks beforehand. That means if the WHL’s plan goes as hoped for the Raiders could be on the ice as early as Sept. 15, although, amid the pandemic the decision is still up in the air.

ian.gustafson@jpbg.ca

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Vernon Community Art Centre holding annual Christmas art sale – Vernon News – Castanet.net

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You will not find any of these gift ideas in a big box store.

The Vernon Community Art Centre is hosting its 15th annual Artsolutely artisan sale full of Christmas gifts.

Sheri Kunzli, with the Arts Council of the North Okanagan, said all of the works are made by local artists and are a one-of-a-kind creation.

The art centre sells art year round, but in December they shut down their programs and dedicate the entire Polson Park building to the art sale that is open seven days a week through Dec. 24.

Works from more than 35 artists are on sale.

Every piece is carefully handcrafted and locally made, and each artisan is selected through a jurying process to ensure the highest quality throughout.

“Everything is hand made, unique quality and all of the artists go through a jurying process to participate which keeps the quality up,” said Kunzli.

“The Arts Centre is one of Vernon’s gems. It’s more than a place to shop, and it is more than an arts education facility. It’s a community space that offers a place for people of all ages and abilities to create, play, laugh, gain skills, release stress, heal and develop friendships. Having to shut down the Arts Centre in the Spring was devastating on many levels.

“As a non-profit, the closure set us back significantly, but it also impacted the hundreds of people that utilize the Centre. We are working hard to keep the doors open because our community needs us. This place tells the stories of why the arts matter to individuals and our community at large. It’s a place that has been a haven for creatives and allowed people to thrive.”

For more information on Artsolutely, click here.

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North Vancouver's Anonymous Art Show identifies safe way to hold exhibition this year – Vancouver Is Awesome

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A well-known annual event where anonymous local artists are encouraged to sell their original works will now feature a buying public who will remain largely unseen as well.

North Van Arts’ 16th annual Anonymous Art Show has moved online this year in order to follow new provincial health orders.

Following a week-long preview, the sales begin tonight (Nov. 26) at 7 p.m. and will continue until Dec. 19 at 5 p.m.

Unlike live performance venues, arts retail spaces and galleries – such as CityScape Community ArtSpace where the show is usually held – are technically allowed to remain open under new COVID-19 restrictions put in place on Nov. 19, as long as no formal community events are held.

While the exhibition is being installed and will remain at CityScape, North Van Arts has opted to essentially suspend its in-person exhibition this year and is instead encouraging the public to check out and purchase the pieces online, according to Nancy Cottingham Powell, executive director at North Van Arts.

“Normally on opening night we would have 300 people going through this gallery. Obviously that’s not going to happen right now,” said Powell. “Viewing it online is really the way to go.”

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Original artwork from 250 emerging and established artists from North and West Vancouver will be up for grabs for $100 apiece. Proceeds from the art show are split between the local artists and North Van Arts, who will use the funds to supports ongoing programming.

The artist behind each painting will remain anonymous until their work is sold and their name is revealed, according to Powell.

“It’s a great test-place for people,” said Powell. “I think it’s an important show because we’ve got the whole community at the table.”

More than 125 would-be art buyers have already registered for the opening night of sales, added Powell.

Click here for more information about this year’s Anonymous Art Show.

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Quebec fights to give Jean-Paul Riopelle's art a proper home – The Globe and Mail

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Les masques by Jean Paul Riopelle, 1964.

Estate of Jean Paul Riopelle

Jean-Paul Riopelle had returned from Europe 12 years before his death in 2002, but Quebec is still fighting to give its modernist art star a proper home. It’s a battle, made tougher by the pandemic, to preserve a precarious cultural legacy, but the artist’s supporters are digging in on two separate fronts.

One is a major exhibition arguing that Riopelle, a painter best remembered for the aggressive abstraction he produced in the 1950s in Paris, was influenced both by the northern landscape and the Indigenous presence in Canada. That ground-breaking show was supposed to be opening this month at the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts (MMFA), but COVID-19 closures have delayed it until January at the earliest.

The other front is the recently formed Riopelle Foundation, dedicated to creating a permanent gallery and research centre in time for the artist’s centenary in 2023. With only three years to go, the foundation is still looking for a building after the MMFA announced last week that it is canceling plans to house the project because of the pandemic’s impact on finances.

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Pangnirtung, 1977.

Estate of Jean Paul Riopelle

“I believe the work of Riopelle deserves to be better understood and presented. … His critical stature has shrunk from being an international star to a provincial legend,” Stéphane Aquin, the new MMFA director, said in an interview. Aquin believes restoring Riopelle’s lustre is probably best achieved by the foundation presenting itself as a stand-alone destination in Montreal. At any rate, he is not going to expose his institution to the rapidly rising construction costs of adding a new floor to the museum’s Desmarais Pavilion on the south side of Sherbrooke Street.

“Our attitude is very definitely to move ahead and seek other alternatives, whether to acquire an existing building or build a new one,” said Michael Audain, the Vancouver developer and collector who co-founded the foundation. He was planning to donate his 36 Riopelles to the MMFA’s cancelled project.

The rupture between the foundation and the MMFA is not irreparable, as the museum unveils its new Riopelle exhibition, albeit online only. The artist’s daughter, Yseult Riopelle, who also established the foundation, was present for the show’s media launch Wednesday.

Jean-Paul Riopelle, second from left, on a fishing trip in Quebec, about 1975.

Claude Duthuit /Archives Yseult Riopelle

Author of her father’s catalogue raisonné, she began researching his interest in Indigenous art after his death. “We imbibed that atmosphere,” she said in French, describing the Inuit and Northwest Coast art that surrounded the family during the artist’s Paris years. In 2016, she joined forces with MMFA curators already working on the thesis that Riopelle, who began returning to Canada for hunting trips in the 1970s, was influenced by the idea of the North. And so, Riopelle: The Call of Northern Landscapes and Indigenous Cultures came together, originally intended as a run-up to the new Riopelle wing.

That space was the latest of many ambitious expansions – probably too many – undertaken by former MMFA director Nathalie Bondil before she was controversially fired last summer. At Wednesday’s media conference nobody mentioned her name, but the exhibition that includes both historic and contemporary Indigenous art alongside 110 works by Riopelle seems typical of the multidisciplinary and cross-cultural directions she was championing.

The public can see the show online between Dec. 1 and Jan. 11, at which point the MMFA hopes to reopen. A full analysis of the exhibition’s thesis and art is going to have to wait for that physical tour: Riopelle’s best-known work is famous for a sculptural impasto applied with the palette knife rather than the brush.

Yet one goal of both the exhibition and the foundation is to broaden that popular image of wild-man modernism to include Riopelle’s delicate drawings and complex sculptures as well as the later landscapes and iceberg paintings. Audain, an impassioned fan, often speaks about the need to introduce the work to a younger generation across Canada. The show will tour to the Audain Art Museum in Whistler, B.C., and the Glenbow Museum in Calgary, but so far not to any international venues. Still, in an era when mid-century modernism is trendy and Indigenous art is highly prized, the exhibition might yet fuel a Riopelle revival.

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Meanwhile, the foundation pushes ahead. The Quebec government has promised that the $10-million grant attached to the MMFA’s wing will now follow the foundation to wherever it lands. “Riopelle lived in France for 40 years and returned in the end for the last 12 years,” said foundation director Manon Gauthier. “It’s about bringing a great Canadian hero home to Montreal.”

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