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Lululemon's earnings top estimates on strong sales, but retailer won't offer outlook due to coronavirus pandemic – CNBC

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Lululemon announced Thursday fiscal fourth-quarter results that topped expectations, as its same-store sales surged 20% during the period, thanks, in part, to more men shopping in its stores and online. 

However, due to the uncertainty from the coronavirus pandemic, the yoga pants maker said it will not be providing a fiscal 2020 outlook at this time. Its stock fell about 2% in after-hours trading. 

Here’s how the company did during the fourth quarter compared with what analysts were expecting, based on Refinitiv data: 

  • Earnings per share: $2.28 vs. $2.24 expected
  • Revenue: $1.40 billion vs. $1.38 billion expected

Net income rose to $298 million, or $2.28 per share, from $218.5 million, or $1.65 a share, a year ago. That was better than the $2.24 per share analysts were expecting it to earn, based on Refinitiv data. 

Net revenue grew roughly 20% to $1.40 billion from $1.17 billion a year ago. Analysts were calling for $1.38 billion in revenue.

Same-store sales overall were up 20%, the company said. Digital sales surged 41% during the quarter. Men’s revenue was up 32%, and women’s was up 17%. 

“The strength of our brand and strong financial position will help us manage through the day-to-day, while continuing to effectively plan for and invest in our future,” CEO Calvin McDonald said in a statement. 

In February, because of the heightened spread of COVID-19, Lululemon closed all of its stores temporarily in mainland China. It said Thursday that all but one of these shops have since reopened. Earlier this month, Lululemon temporarily closed all of its stores in North America, Europe, Malaysia and New Zealand due to the virus. It also has temporarily closed a distribution center in Sumner, Washington. 

Based on learnings from China, McDonald told analysts Thursday that he has confidence the business “will bounce back.” He said sales in China are not yet back to their levels prior to stores in the region closing. But volume is improving “week by week,” he said. 

Lululemon stores in the U.S., Canada and other markets will be reopening on a “market by market basis,” the CEO said, based on local information. “Our stores will reopen. … Lululemon is in a very healthy position.” But he cautioned that the company is planning for stores in North America to be closed for longer than they were in China. 

Lululemon, meantime, has confidence that even if shoppers are not looking to buy leggings and sports bras today, the retailer does not have to worry about putting items on sale, in the future, to move them off shelves. 

Much of Lululemon’s merchandise is “less seasonal in nature,” compared with other apparel categories, McDonald explained. “Styles can be held for future use.” 

“We do not believe [the coronavirus] will change the trend toward people wanting to live active and healthy lifestyles,” he added. 

In managing expenses, Lululemon said it will be scaling back on store openings and remodels in the near term. 

Lululemon shares closed Thursday up about 3.7%. The stock is down about 15% this year. The company has a market cap of about $26.2 billion. 

Read the full press release here. 

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Russia, Saudi Arabia, 'Very Close' To Reaching Oil Output Deal – OilPrice.com

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Russia, Saudi Arabia, ‘Very Close’ To Reaching Oil Output Deal | OilPrice.com

Tsvetana Paraskova

Tsvetana is a writer for Oilprice.com with over a decade of experience writing for news outlets such as iNVEZZ and SeeNews. 

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    Saudi Arabia and Russia are “very, very close” to reaching an agreement on how to react to the low oil prices, Kirill Dmitriev, chief executive at Russia’s sovereign wealth fund, the Russian Direct Investment Fund (RDIF), told CNBC on Monday.

    “I think the whole market understands that this deal is important and it will bring lots of stability, so much important stability to the market, and we are very close,” Dmitriev told CNBC on the day on which the former allies were set to hold a video meeting with other major producers, including U.S. representatives, to try to hammer out an agreement for a global collective cut of 10 million bpd and even more.  

    The meeting is now delayed to later this week, possibly April 9, OPEC sources told Reuters, after the spat between the Saudis and the Russians over who broke up their partnership took a turn for the worse over the weekend.

    First, Russia’s Energy Minister Alexander Novak and President Vladimir Putin said on Friday that Saudi Arabia withdrew from the OPEC+ agreement, announcing “significant additional discounts on their oil, as well as plans for a sharp increase in production,” as per the Kremlin’s English translation of a meeting between Putin and Novak on the global energy markets. 

    “As I said, we did not initiate the breakup of the OPEC+ deal. We are always ready to reach an agreement with our partners, in the OPEC+ format, and we are prepared to cooperate with the United States on this issue. I consider it necessary to pool our efforts to balance the market and reduce production as a result of these concerted and well-coordinated efforts. Based on tentative estimates, I believe the reduction should be about 10 million barrels per day, more or less,” Putin said.

    “The key partners in balancing the market should be producers like the United States,” Novak said, after noting that “Unfortunately, our partners from Saudi Arabia did not agree to extend the current deal on the current conditions. In fact, they withdrew from the agreement and announced significant additional discounts on their oil, as well as plans for a sharp increase in production.” Related: The Largest Rig Count Collapse In 5 Years

    Saudi Arabia reacted to these statements by putting out a statement from Energy Minister Abdulaziz bin Salman, who said that, via the Saudi Press Agency:

    “These claims are categorically false and contrary to fact.”

    “His Royal Highness noted that the Kingdom has exerted great efforts with OPEC+ countries to take action to prevent a glut in the oil market resulting from a decline in the global economic growth. However, this proposal made by the Kingdom and approved by 22 countries, unfortunately was not agreed upon by the Russian delegates, leading to non-agreement,” Saudi Arabia said.

    While the Saudis and Russians spat over who is to blame, they both signal that they would not cut production if the U.S. doesn’t join a global effort to reduce output.  

    By Tsvetana Paraskova for Oilprice.com

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      Oil prices pull back after OPEC and Russia delay discussions on cutting output – CBC.ca

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      Oil prices fell on Monday after Saudi Arabia and Russia delayed a meeting to discuss output cuts that could help to reduce global oversupply as the coronavirus pandemic pummels demand.

      Brent crude fell more than $3 US when Asian markets opened but recovered some ground, with traders hopeful a deal between the top producers was still within reach.

      Brent was down 81 cents, or 2.4 per cent, at $33.30 US a barrel. U.S. crude was 65 cents, or 2.3 per cent lower, at $27.69 a barrel, after having earlier been as low as $25.28.

      The Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries and its allies, a group known as OPEC+, are expected to meet on Thursday, instead of Monday, to discuss cutting production.

      “Perhaps it is best that the meeting was delayed for producers to cement a minimum of common ground before the actual discussions take place on Thursday,” BNP Paribas analyst Harry Tchilinguirian said. He noted initial disappointment at the delay had driven down prices in Asian business.

      Kremlin spokesperson Dmitry Peskov said Moscow was ready to co-ordinate with other oil exporting countries to help stabilize the market and that the OPEC+ meeting was delayed for technical reasons.

      OPEC+ is working on a deal to cut production by about 10 per cent of world supply, or 10 million barrels per day (bpd), in what member states expect to be an unprecedented global effort.

      But Rystad Energy’s head of oil markets, Bjornar Tonhaugen, said even if the group agrees to cut up to 15 million bpd, “it will only be enough to scratch the surface of the more than 23 million bpd supply overhang predicted for April 2020.”

      Sentiment was lifted by Saudi Arabia’s decision to delay releasing its official crude selling prices to Friday, pending the outcome of the OPEC+ meeting.

      U.S. President Donald Trump has said he would impose tariffs on crude imports if needed to protect U.S. energy workers from the oil price crash.

      Investor morale in the eurozone fell to an all-time low in April and the bloc’s economy is in deep recession because of the novel coronavirus, a survey showed on Monday.

      “Wherever you look, the narrative is the same: the global economy is in a painful recession,” Stephen Brennock of oil broker PVM said. “As OPEC+ ponders fresh supply curbs, you can’t help but think that the oil market will continue to be at the mercy of the virus pandemic.”

      Second wave of COVID-19 infections in China

      Markets were also spooked when the National Health Commission of China said on Monday that 78 new asymptomatic cases had been identified as of the end of the day on Sunday, compared with 47 the day before.

      Asymptomatic patients, who show no symptoms but can still pass the virus to others, have become China’s chief concern after strict containment measures succeeded in cutting the overall infection rate.

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      Premarket: Stocks jump on virus slowdown hopes, but oil slips on oversupply – The Globe and Mail

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      World stock markets jumped on Monday, encouraged by a slowdown in coronavirus-related deaths and new cases, though a delay in talks between Saudi Arabia and Russia to cut supply sent oil tumbling again.

      Equity investors were encouraged as the death toll from the virus slowed across major European nations including France and Italy.

      London’s FTSE raced up 2%, indexes in Paris and Milan rose 3% and Germany’s DAX gained more than 4% after Japan’s Nikkei finished with similar gains overnight.

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      There was plenty of news to demonstrate just how brutal the virus has been: eye-popping plunges in car sales and air travel in Europe, Britain’s prime minister being hospitalised , and Japan preparing to declare a state of emergency. But the markets appeared hopeful.

      Wall Street S&P 500 emini futures were up almost 4%, close to their upper limit too, buoyed by comments from U.S. President Donald Trump that his country was also seeing a “levelling off” of the crisis.

      “What is driving the market is the evidence that the number of new cases has started to turn the corner,” said Rabobank’s Head of Macro Strategy Elwin de Groot.

      As well as a slowdown in deaths in Italy, he said, improvements were starting to become visible in Spain and even in the United States there had been a little bit of a let-up.

      “When you see that happening you can start gauging when lockdowns can start to be gradually lifted. That gives a little bit more visibility and that is vital,” he added, although he stressed there were still huge uncertainties and risks.

      As has been the pattern for most of the year, commodity markets saw the day’s other big moves.

      Brent crude fell as much as $4 after Saudi Arabia and Russia, who have been at loggerheads this year over production, pushed back the planned start of a meeting of the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries and its allies, a group known as OPEC+, until Thursday.

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      OPEC+ is working on a deal to cut oil production by about 10% of world supply, or 10 million barrels per day (bpd), in what member states expect to be an unprecedented global effort.

      The countries are “very, very close” to a deal on cuts, one of Russia’s top oil negotiators, Kirill Dmitriev, who heads the nation’s wealth fund, told CNBC.

      But Rystad Energy’s head of oil markets Bjornar Tonhaugen said even if the group agreed to cut up to 15 million bpd, “it will only be enough to scratch the surface of the more than 23 million bpd supply overhang predicted for April 2020.”

      EMERGENCY CALLS

      In currency markets, the yen fell 0.6% to 109.14 against the dollar and weakened against other major currencies as Japan’s Prime Minister Shinzo Abe said the government would declare a state of emergency as early as Tuesday to curb a spike in coronavirus infections.

      The dollar barely budged against the euro but the pound recovered having dipped 0.4% after British Prime Minister Boris Johnson was admitted to hospital for tests as he was still suffering symptoms of the coronavirus.

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      Yields on safe-haven German government bonds crept higher in fixed income markets too, reflecting the slightly brighter tone in world markets despite some painful data.

      Investor morale in the euro zone fell to an all-time low in April and the currency bloc’s economy is now in deep recession due to the coronavirus, which is “holding the world economy in a stranglehold”, a Sentix survey showed.

      Orders for German-made goods had already dropped 1.4% in February, German data showed. British car sales slumped 40% last month and Norweigen Air’s traffic plummeted 60%.

      “Never before has the assessment of the current situation collapsed so sharply in all regions of the world within one month,” Sentix managing director Patrick Hussy said.

      “The situation is … much worse than in 2009,” Hussy said. “Economic forecasts to date underestimate the shrinking process. The recession will go much deeper and longer.”

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      In Asia, stocks had also proven bullish. Australia’s benchmark index rose 4.33%, Japan’s Nikkei added 4.24% after a slow start, while South Korea’s KOSPI index climbed 3.85%. Hong Kong’s Hang Seng index was 2.18% higher.

      That sent MSCI’s broadest index of Asian shares outside of Japan up 2%, on track for its best performance in more than a week.

      Markets in mainland China were closed for a public holiday.

      Worryingly, the number of new coronavirus cases jumped in China on Sunday, while the number of asymptomatic cases surged too as Beijing continued to struggle to extinguish the outbreak despite drastic containment efforts.

      “Focus in markets will now turn to the path out of lockdown and to what extent containment measures can be lifted without risking a second wave of infections,” National Australia Bank analyst Tapas Strickland wrote in a note.

      “Key to a strong rebound in China will be the ongoing lifting of containment measures, with Wuhan – the epicentre of the outbreak – set to lift containment measures on April 8.”

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      Reuters

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