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Mandalorian Star Gina Carano Could Face Termination For Latest Controversial Comments On Social Media – Forbes

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Actress Gina Carano has found herself under fire more times than her character Cara Dune on the Disney+ series The Mandalorian. On Wednesday Carano faced new backlash across social media for comments she posted on Instagram earlier in the week.

According to io9 Wednesday evening those comments resulted in Carano’s termination, and a Lucasfilm spokesperson said via a statement, “Gina Carano is not currently employed by Lucasfilm and there are no plans for her to be in the future. Nevertheless, her social media posts denigrating people based on their cultural and religious identities are abhorrent and unacceptable.”

Disney+ had remained quiet in the past, but the Mouse House could not avoid this latest round of highly charged comments. In one of the posts, the controversial actress suggested today’s political divide was similar to the situation in Nazi Germany in the 1930s.

Multiple sources including Variety reported that Carano posted, “Jews were beaten in the streets, not by Nazi soldiers but by their neighbors…even by children. Because history is edited, most people today don’t realize that to get to the point where Nazi soldiers could easily round up thousands of Jews, the government first made their own neighbors hate them simply for being Jews. How is that any different from hating someone for their political views?”

In another post, Carano showed a photo of an individual with several cloth masks covering the person’s head, with the caption, “Meanwhile in California.” Both of those posts had been removed from the actress’s account by Wednesday afternoon, but other controversial posts have remained.

It didn’t long on Wednesday for the hashtag #FireGinaCarano to once again make the rounds, and that was tagged to the social media accounts for not only Disney and Disney+ but also “Star Wars” and Lucasfilms. Several users on Twitter even reposted screen captures of Carano’s original comments from Instagram.

What is notable about this turn of events is that it comes less than two weeks after the #WeLoveCaraDune and #WeLoveGinaCarano hashtags trended on social media and seemingly drown out the #FireGinaCarano hashtag.

After this latest incident of bad judgment on social media Disney was forced to act and that likely included nixing any plans for a Cara Dune spin off but more likely disintegrating of the character completely.

Tech industry analyst Rob Enderle suggested that the Mouse House really had no tolerance for this kind of thing at all.

“Her latest post crosses many lines that Disney will see as significant red flags,” Enderle, who is principal analyst at the Enderle Group, explained in an email. “I expect she has ended her career with them at this point.”

Extreme commentary on social has ended prominent careers in the past, and that included Rosanne Barr, who was famously fired from her own sitcom on ABC, which is also owned by Disney. Other actors may tread more carefully, especially if Disney does fire Carano.

“This series of events showcases both the risk of social media to careers and the growing risk of conservative media’s false positions on reputations and job opportunities,” added Enderle.

“It won’t be hard for people to extend these remarks back to historical quotes by Walt Disney that could damage the Disney brand far beyond the benefit she provides as an actor,” said Enderle. “Disney has a hard rule about being on and off stage – when you are in public, you are on message, and social media is public – and preserving the Disney brand image that she just broke severely. I don’t see her surviving this latest mistake.”

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Fixing the Social Media Crisis – Harvard Business Review

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Social networks are polarizing communities and spreading lies. Can we engineer a healthier online ecosystem?

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India plans new social media controls after Twitter face-off – Saskatoon StarPhoenix

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Article content

NEW DELHI — Chafing from a dispute with Twitter, India plans to oblige social media companies to erase contentious content fast and assist investigations, according to a draft regulation.

New Delhi’s planned “Intermediary Guidelines and Digital Media Ethics Code” – a copy of which was seen by Reuters – come as various nations around the world try to assert tighter control over powerful Big Tech firms.

Facebook faced a global backlash from publishers and politicians last week after blocking news feeds in Australia in a dispute with the government over revenue-sharing.

In India, Twitter ignored orders to remove content over farmers’ protests, fueling the zeal of Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s government since 2018 to tighten regulation for content it deems disinformation or unlawful.

The latest draft rules – which would be legally enforcable -say companies should remove content as early as possible, but not later than 36 hours, after a government or legal order.

They must also assist in investigations or other cyber security-related incidents within 72 hours of a request. Further, if a post depicts an individual in any sexual act or conduct, then companies must disable or remove such content within a day of receiving a complaint, the rules added.

Article content

Facebook did not immediately respond to a request for comment. Twitter, which did not take down all accounts the government alleged were spreading lies about the protests over agricultural reforms, declined to comment.

RACIAL, RELIGIOUS CONTEXT

The draft proposal also requires companies to appoint a chief compliance officer, another executive for coordinating on law enforcement and a “grievance redressal officer.”

All must be resident Indian citizens.

The Ministry of Electronics and Information Technology did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

It was unclear when the rules would be announced of if they may undergo further changes.

Industry sources say new regulations could hit Big Tech firms’ investment plans in India and increase compliance headaches. The rules would also apply across other digital and online media, the draft proposal said.

“A publisher shall take into consideration India’s multi-racial and multi-religious context and exercise due caution and discretion when featuring the activities, beliefs, practices, or views of any racial or religious group,” the draft rules said.

Referring to films and other entertainment, including web-based serials, the draft rules called for a “classification rating” to describe content and advise discretion.

Streaming platforms such as Netflix and Amazon Prime have faced complaints in India for obscenity.

Police in the northern state of Uttar Pradesh questioned an Amazon executive for nearly four hours on Tuesday over allegations that a political drama, “Tandav,” hurt religious sentiments and caused public anger. (Reporting by Aditya Kalra and Sankalp Phartiyal in New Delhi; Editing by Andrew Cawthorne)

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India plans new social media controls after Twitter face-off – Saskatoon StarPhoenix

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Article content

NEW DELHI — Chafing from a dispute with Twitter, India plans to oblige social media companies to erase contentious content fast and assist investigations, according to a draft regulation.

New Delhi’s planned “Intermediary Guidelines and Digital Media Ethics Code” – a copy of which was seen by Reuters – come as various nations around the world try to assert tighter control over powerful Big Tech firms.

Facebook faced a global backlash from publishers and politicians last week after blocking news feeds in Australia in a dispute with the government over revenue-sharing.

In India, Twitter ignored orders to remove content over farmers’ protests, fueling the zeal of Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s government since 2018 to tighten regulation for content it deems disinformation or unlawful.

The latest draft rules – which would be legally enforcable -say companies should remove content as early as possible, but not later than 36 hours, after a government or legal order.

They must also assist in investigations or other cyber security-related incidents within 72 hours of a request. Further, if a post depicts an individual in any sexual act or conduct, then companies must disable or remove such content within a day of receiving a complaint, the rules added.

Article content

Facebook did not immediately respond to a request for comment. Twitter, which did not take down all accounts the government alleged were spreading lies about the protests over agricultural reforms, declined to comment.

RACIAL, RELIGIOUS CONTEXT

The draft proposal also requires companies to appoint a chief compliance officer, another executive for coordinating on law enforcement and a “grievance redressal officer.”

All must be resident Indian citizens.

The Ministry of Electronics and Information Technology did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

It was unclear when the rules would be announced of if they may undergo further changes.

Industry sources say new regulations could hit Big Tech firms’ investment plans in India and increase compliance headaches. The rules would also apply across other digital and online media, the draft proposal said.

“A publisher shall take into consideration India’s multi-racial and multi-religious context and exercise due caution and discretion when featuring the activities, beliefs, practices, or views of any racial or religious group,” the draft rules said.

Referring to films and other entertainment, including web-based serials, the draft rules called for a “classification rating” to describe content and advise discretion.

Streaming platforms such as Netflix and Amazon Prime have faced complaints in India for obscenity.

Police in the northern state of Uttar Pradesh questioned an Amazon executive for nearly four hours on Tuesday over allegations that a political drama, “Tandav,” hurt religious sentiments and caused public anger. (Reporting by Aditya Kalra and Sankalp Phartiyal in New Delhi; Editing by Andrew Cawthorne)

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