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Manitoba reports 130 new COVID-19 cases, 2 deaths – Global News

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Manitoba is reporting 130 new COVID-19 cases and two additional deaths linked to the virus.

The cases reported on the province’s online COVID-19 dashboard Friday bring Manitoba’s total number of active infections to 927 and the province’s five-day test positivity rate to 3.4 per cent.

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Manitoba reports 132 new COVID-19 cases, 1 death

Health officials reported 132 new cases Thursday, Manitoba’s highest single-day total of new COVID-19 cases since June 19.

According to data on the site, 90 of Manitoba’s latest infections are among people who had yet to be vaccinated, seven were partially vaccinated and 33 were fully vaccinated.


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More businesses fined for flouting COVID-19 health orders


More businesses fined for flouting COVID-19 health orders

The Southern Health region saw the largest one-day jump in cases, with 43 infections reported Friday.

Another 20 cases come from the Winnipeg Health region, 16 were found in the Prairie Mountain Health region, 33 were reported in the Northern Health region and 18 were found in the Interlake-Eastern Health region.

Read more:
4th wave of COVID-19 no longer growing, cases could decline in coming weeks, PHAC says

The number of deaths linked to COVID-19 reported on the dashboard climbed two to 1,217 Friday.

Details about the latest victim will be provided in the province’s next COVID-19 media release Monday.


Manitoba Health.


Manitoba Health

There were 90 hospitalizations due to COVID-19 reported as of Friday morning and 14 patients in intensive care units as a result of the virus.

Health data shows 3,296 tests for COVID-19 were performed Thursday.

Read more:
Manitoba Health gearing up for seasonal flu campaign

provincial site tracking vaccination efforts shows 85.5 per cent of eligible Manitobans have received one shot of vaccine and 81.6 have received two doses. According to the site, 1,710 vaccinations were scheduled on Friday.

In all, Manitoba has reported 61,385 COVID-19 cases since March 2020.

Questions about COVID-19? Here are some things you need to know:

Symptoms can include fever, cough and difficulty breathing — very similar to a cold or flu. Some people can develop a more severe illness. People most at risk of this include older adults and people with severe chronic medical conditions like heart, lung or kidney disease. If you develop symptoms, contact public health authorities.

To prevent the virus from spreading, experts recommend frequent handwashing and coughing into your sleeve. They also recommend minimizing contact with others, staying home as much as possible and maintaining a distance of two metres from other people if you go out. In situations where you can’t keep a safe distance from others, public health officials recommend the use of a non-medical face mask or covering to prevent spreading the respiratory droplets that can carry the virus. In some provinces and municipalities across the country, masks or face coverings are now mandatory in indoor public spaces.

For full COVID-19 coverage from Global News, visit our coronavirus page.

© 2021 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

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Beck: Feeling bloated? Try these diet tweaks – The Globe and Mail

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Many of us have experienced bloating at one time or another, the sensation when your stomach feels full and swollen. For some people, though, the discomfort caused by chronic bloating can interfere with everyday life.

Bloating is common affecting up to 30 per cent of the general population. Among people with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), more than 90 per cent report bloating.

The good news: In many cases making simple diet changes can reduce, even resolve, uncomfortable bloating. The key, however, is determining what your bloat triggers are.

What is bloating?

Bloating is a recurrent sense of fullness, pressure or trapped gas in the upper abdomen (e.g., the stomach area). In some cases it’s accompanied by abdominal distention, a measurable increase in abdominal girth. Abdominal pain, gas and burping can also be present.

Symptoms may worsen over the course of the day or they can be triggered by eating a meal. Often bloating dissipates overnight.

The most common cause of bloating is air, or gas, trapped in the intestinal tract. What you eat – and how you eat – can lead to a build-up of intestinal gas.

Other reasons for bloating include inflammatory bowel disease, small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO), gluten intolerance (celiac disease) and non-celiac gluten-sensitivity. Chronic constipation, stress and certain medications (e.g., Aspirin, antacids, anti-diarrhea drugs) can also contribute to bloating.

Diet strategies to prevent bloating

While bloating may be caused by an underlying medical condition, it’s most often a result of what you eat and/or how you eat. Your first line of defense is addressing your diet.

Avoid overeating. Eating large meals, especially fatty meals that empty from your stomach slowly, can make you feel bloated. To eat smaller portions, serve meals on a luncheon-sized plate (seven to nine inches in diameter) instead of a dinner plate.

Check in with your hunger level halfway through your meal. You’ve had enough to eat when you feel satisfied but not full.

Slow your eating pace. Eating quickly can contribute to bloating by causing you to overeat. It takes roughly 20 minutes for appetite-related hormones to kick in and tell your brain you’ve had enough to eat.

Eating too fast also increases the amount of air you swallow, which can cause bloating. To eat slowly, put down your knife and fork after every bite and chew thoroughly.

Chewing gum, sucking on hard candies and drinking from a straw also increase the amount of air you swallow.

Increase fibre, water. If constipation is causing your bloating, increase your intake of foods rich in insoluble fibre, the type of fibre that retains water and adds bulk to stool, helping it pass more quickly through the colon.

Wheat bran, 100-per-cent bran cereal, whole wheat pasta and whole grain rye bread are excellent sources of insoluble fibre. Apples, berries, kiwifruit, pinto beans, green peas, sweet potato, avocado and prunes are also decent sources.

Fibre needs to absorb water to work effectively. Drink nine cups (women) and 12 cups (men) of water each day.

Try lactose-free. If you’re intolerant to lactose, the natural sugar in cow’s milk, consuming more lactose than your small intestine can digest can cause bloating, abdominal pain, distention, gas and loose stools.

If you suspect lactose may be the culprit, switch to lactose-free milk and lactose-free yogurt to see if your bloating symptoms improve. Hard cheeses (e.g., cheddar, Swiss, Parmesan) are low in lactose.

Consider a low-FODMAP diet. If you have IBS, bloating may be triggered by a group of poorly absorbed carbohydrates called FODMAPs. (FODMAP stands for fermentable, oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides and polyols.) Lactose, by the way, is a FODMAP.

As FODMAPs move through the small intestine they draw in water. Once in the large intestine, gut bacteria ferment FODMAPs, which produces gas. Extra water and gas in the intestinal tract can cause IBS symptoms such as bloating, abdominal pain, flatulence and diarrhea.

Finding out which FODMAPs you’re sensitive to involves eliminating high-FODMAP foods for a short period of time and then, one at a time, adding FODMAPs back to your diet.

Consult a dietitian knowledgeable in low-FODMAP meal planning – and the strategic reintroduction and testing of FODMAPs – to ensure you follow a nutritionally balanced diet.

When to see a doctor

If dietary modifications don’t reduce your bloating, consult your doctor. It’s important to rule out any other conditions that could be causing your symptoms.

Leslie Beck, a Toronto-based private practice dietitian, is director of food and nutrition at Medcan. Follow her on Twitter @LeslieBeckRD

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Two doctors barred from issuing medical exemptions for COVID-19 vaccines, mandatory mask requirements – CP24 Toronto's Breaking News

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The regulatory body for Ontario’s medical profession has barred two outspoken doctors from issuing any medical exemptions related to COVID-19 vaccinations.

The College of Physicians and Surgeons of Ontario announced the restrictions against Dr. Mark Trozzi, of Harrow, and Dr. Rochagne Kilian, of Owen Sound, on Monday morning.

Both Trozzi and Kilian have been outspoken about COVID-19 restrictions in the past while expressing skepticism about COVID-19 vaccines.

Kilian, in particular, has previously been a speaker at several rallies organized by the group “Grey- Bruce Freedom Fighters” and last month resigned from her position as an emergency room doctor in protest over the Grey Bruce Health Services handling of the pandemic.

Under the interim order announced today but issued last week, the physicians have been barred from providing medical exemptions in relation to COVID-19 vaccines, mandatory mask requirements for COVID-19 and testing for COVID-19.

Their practices will also be required to post information about restrictions in their offices.

The college said that it is issuing the interim orders under powers granted to it in 2018, which permits it to “suspend or impose terms, conditions or limitations on a member’s certificate of registration where the college believes that the conduct exposes or is likely to expose patients to harm or injury.

Neither doctor has been referred to the tribunal with allegations related to the restrictions at this point.

Asked about the orders at Queen’s Park on Monday, NDP Leader Andrea Horwath applauded the college for “proactively” addressing the issue while suggesting that there should be more of a system to protect the integrity of Ontario’s proof-of-vaccination requirement.

“If this has happened with these two physicians, where’s the system to make sure it’s not happening in many other instances so that how can we be assured of the reliability?” she asked. “We know that (Doug) Ford didn’t want to do this, we know that he got dragged to a certificate program kicking and screaming and a result it was late, and it’s inadequate and this is another one of the inadequacies.”

Chief Medical Officer of Health Dr. Kieran Moore has previously said that COVID-19 vaccines are safe and highly effective and that medical exemptions should only be granted at a rate of about five people per 100,000.

He has said that the only two legitimate medical exemptions are an allergy to one of the components of the vaccine or an increased risk of myocarditis.

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Biden administration asks U.S. Supreme Court to block Texas abortion law

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President Joe Biden’s administration on Monday asked the U.S. Supreme Court to block a Texas law that imposes a near-total ban on  abortion after a lower court reinstated the Republican-backed measure.

The administration made its request to the Supreme Court seeking to quickly reverse a decision by the New Orleans-based 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals to lift a judge’s order blocking the law while litigation over the matter continues.

 

(Reporting by Andrew Chung in New York and Lawrence Hurley in Washington; Editing by Will Dunham)

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