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Manitoba sees COVID-19 record cases, nearly 300 active in province – Global News

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Manitoba public health officials say there have been 42 new cases of coronavirus identified as of Saturday morning, bringing the total number of lab-confirmed cases in the province to 872.

Saturday marks the highest number of cases announced in a single day since the pandemic started.

Read more:
Brandon region frustrated by tighter COVID-19 restrictions, but willing to do what it takes

The current five-day COVID-19 test positivity rate is 1.8 per cent.

The data shows there were:
• 24 new cases in the Prairie Mountain Health region
• 16 new cases in Southern Health-Santé Sud
• two new cases in the Winnipeg health region

Manitoba public health officials say there are six people currently in hospital with one in intensive care.

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There are 290 known active cases in Manitoba, while 570 people have recovered.

The total number of deaths in the province due to COVID-19 remains 12.






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Wedding woes


Wedding woes

Starting on Monday, the Prairie Mountain health region is being elevated to the restricted level (orange).

That means masks will be mandatory in all public indoor places and at all indoor and outdoor public gatherings in the region. Public gatherings will also be restricted to 10 people, both indoors and outdoors.

Manitobans within this region are encouraged to take these extra precautions immediately to help slow the spread of this virus.

Testing numbers show an additional 1,849 laboratory tests were completed on Friday, bringing the total number of tests completed since early February to 124,140.

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Read more:
Manitoba sees 33 new cases of coronavirus, further restrictions coming to Prairie Mountain Health region

The province is also reminding people to focus on the fundamentals to help stop the spread of COVID-19. This means not going out while you feel ill, practicing proper hand hygiene, covering your cough and physical distancing when you are with people outside your household. If you can’t physical distance, wear a mask.

A new community COVID-19 testing site will open at 2735 Pembina Highway in Winnipeg on Tuesday.

The site will be open to the public on a walk-in basis, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., seven days per week.

Access Fort Garry (135 Plaza Drive) will no longer be offering COVID-19 testing once the new site opens. Their last day of public testing will be Monday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.

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© 2020 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

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CDC Now Warns COVID Can Be Spread This Way – Yahoo Canada Shine On

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<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="The CDC updated its guidance about how you could catch COVID-19, saying the disease can be transmitted by aerosols that hang in the air. That means you’ll want to avoid poorly-ventilated indoor spaces where people are doing the following things—read on, and to protect your health and the health of others, don’t miss these Sure Signs You’ve Already Had Coronavirus.” data-reactid=”12″>The CDC updated its guidance about how you could catch COVID-19, saying the disease can be transmitted by aerosols that hang in the air. That means you’ll want to avoid poorly-ventilated indoor spaces where people are doing the following things—read on, and to protect your health and the health of others, don’t miss these Sure Signs You’ve Already Had Coronavirus.

When a Person Sneezes

Ill man wearing grey sweater, yellow hat and spectacles, blowing nose and sneeze into tissue
Ill man wearing grey sweater, yellow hat and spectacles, blowing nose and sneeze into tissue

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="The droplets can really get you when someone sneezes. National Geographic went to a lab at MIT and found scientist Lydia Bourouiba studying sneezes: "Slowed to 2,000 frames per second, video and images from her lab show that a fine mist of mucus and saliva can burst from a person’s mouth at nearly a hundred miles an hour and travel as far as 27 feet."” data-reactid=”25″>The droplets can really get you when someone sneezes. National Geographic went to a lab at MIT and found scientist Lydia Bourouiba studying sneezes: “Slowed to 2,000 frames per second, video and images from her lab show that a fine mist of mucus and saliva can burst from a person’s mouth at nearly a hundred miles an hour and travel as far as 27 feet.”

When a Person Sings

Male And Female Students Singing In Choir At Performing Arts SchoolMale And Female Students Singing In Choir At Performing Arts School
Male And Female Students Singing In Choir At Performing Arts School

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content=""Singing in a room for an extended period of time, in close contact with lots of people and no ventilation—that’s a recipe for disaster," Shelly Miller, a professor at the University of Colorado Boulder, told NPR. "In preliminary research published on July 13, Miller and her fellow researchers found that singers, as well as certain wind and brass instrumentalists, generate respiratory aerosols at high rates. In other words, they spew a lot of droplets into the air when they warble or blow."” data-reactid=”38″>“Singing in a room for an extended period of time, in close contact with lots of people and no ventilation—that’s a recipe for disaster,” Shelly Miller, a professor at the University of Colorado Boulder, told NPR. “In preliminary research published on July 13, Miller and her fellow researchers found that singers, as well as certain wind and brass instrumentalists, generate respiratory aerosols at high rates. In other words, they spew a lot of droplets into the air when they warble or blow.”

When a Person Talks

Two friends watching media content in a smart phoneTwo friends watching media content in a smart phone
Two friends watching media content in a smart phone
<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Yes, just talking can spread COVID-19. "The act of speaking generates droplets that vary in size. Larger droplets pose less of a risk, since they ‘fall quickly to the ground,’ according to the researchers, but smaller ones can dehydrate and linger in the air, essentially acting like an aerosol," reports Health.com, relaying a correspondence published in the New England Journal of Medicine, by researchers from the National Institutes of Health and the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania "This ‘expand[s] the spatial extent of emitted infectious particles,’ the authors said."” data-reactid=”55″>Yes, just talking can spread COVID-19. “The act of speaking generates droplets that vary in size. Larger droplets pose less of a risk, since they ‘fall quickly to the ground,’ according to the researchers, but smaller ones can dehydrate and linger in the air, essentially acting like an aerosol,” reports Health.com, relaying a correspondence published in the New England Journal of Medicine, by researchers from the National Institutes of Health and the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania “This ‘expand[s] the spatial extent of emitted infectious particles,’ the authors said.”

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="RELATED: COVID Mistakes You Should Never Make” data-reactid=”56″>RELATED: COVID Mistakes You Should Never Make

When a Person Breathes

man relaxing after work breathing fresh air sitting at home office desk with laptopman relaxing after work breathing fresh air sitting at home office desk with laptop
man relaxing after work breathing fresh air sitting at home office desk with laptop

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="COVID-19 can be spread even when a person just breathes, says the CDC. A study from the United States National Academy of Sciences, Engineering&amp;Medicine confirmed it: "The study reported that even breathing or talking could possibly release tiny particles (Bioaerosols) carrying the SARS-CoV-2 virus which causes COVID 19," writes author Ramananda Ningthoujam. "The team explained that the virus can stay suspended in the air in the ultrafine mist that is produced when infected people exhale. They recommended wearing masks while going out in public places."” data-reactid=”69″>COVID-19 can be spread even when a person just breathes, says the CDC. A study from the United States National Academy of Sciences, Engineering&Medicine confirmed it: “The study reported that even breathing or talking could possibly release tiny particles (Bioaerosols) carrying the SARS-CoV-2 virus which causes COVID 19,” writes author Ramananda Ningthoujam. “The team explained that the virus can stay suspended in the air in the ultrafine mist that is produced when infected people exhale. They recommended wearing masks while going out in public places.”

When a Person Coughs

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content=""To help stop the spread of germs," says the CDC:” data-reactid=”78″>“To help stop the spread of germs,” says the CDC:

  • Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when you cough or sneeze
  • Throw used tissues in the trash
  • If you don’t have a tissue, cough or sneeze into your elbow, not your hands.”

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="And to get through this pandemic at your healthiest, don’t miss this essential list of 35 Places You’re Most Likely to Catch Coronavirus.&nbsp;” data-reactid=”83″>And to get through this pandemic at your healthiest, don’t miss this essential list of 35 Places You’re Most Likely to Catch Coronavirus

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CDC updates guidance to warn coronavirus can be transmitted through the air by breathing — but then removes it – CBS News

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The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention updated its COVID-19 guidance to acknowledge the risk that the coronavirus can be transmitted through airborne respiratory particles — but then edited its website again Monday morning to take that information down, saying it was still being reviewed.

Before it was taken down, the updated guidance said the coronavirus is most commonly spread “through respiratory droplets or small particles, such as those in aerosols,” which are produced when an infected person coughs, sneezes, sings, talks or even just breathes, and which can remain airborne for a period of time. The virus can then spread to other people who inhale it into their airways.

Many scientists and health experts have been warning for months that COVID-19 can spread through airborne respiratory particles, not just through larger droplets from an infected person coughing or sneezing nearby.

“There is growing evidence that droplets and airborne particles can remain suspended in the air and be breathed in by others, and travel distances beyond 6 feet (for example, during choir practice, in restaurants, or in fitness classes),” the CDC’s updated, but then deleted, guidance said. “In general, indoor environments without good ventilation increase this risk.”

But on Monday — as the number of U.S. deaths from COVID-19 approached 200,000 — the CDC updated the page again to remove the information about the risk of airborne transmission, with a disclaimer at the top: “A draft version of proposed changes to these recommendations was posted in error to the agency’s official website,” the notice read. “CDC is currently updating its recommendations regarding airborne transmission of SARS-CoV-2 (the virus that causes COVID-19). Once this process has been completed, the update language will be posted.”

When asked by CBS News what the issues were with the language on airborne transmission, CDC spokesman Tom Skinner said, “It’s poorly written. The bottom line is aerosol transmission [is] possible but not the main way that [it] spreads.”

CBS News chief medical correspondent Dr. Jon LaPook explained, “It may not be the main way it spreads, but there’s good evidence that the virus can spread through the air under certain circumstances at distances greater than 6 feet.”

The page still states that the virus is spread “through respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs, sneezes, or talks,” but the information about tiny airborne droplets, like those in aerosols, has been removed. The page also no longer lists breathing as a way to transmit the virus. 

Instead, the page reads: “These droplets can land in the mouths or noses of people who are nearby or possibly be inhaled into the lungs.” The Monday update also says COVID-19 is primarily spread between people who have close contact (within 6 feet), and includes that it may be spread by people who are not showing symptoms. 

In July, the World Health Organization (WHO) acknowledged the airborne transmission of “micro-droplets” as a possible cause of COVID-19 infections. WHO’s acknowledgment came after 239 scientists signed an open letter about the risk of airborne transmission. 

Very few diseases — tuberculosis, chicken pox and measles — have been deemed transmissible through aerosols. However, Japan, for example, had been operating for months on the assumption that tiny, aerosolized particles in crowded settings were fueling the spread of the coronavirus. Back in February, Japan adopted a strategy to fight airborne transmission of COVID-19 by telling residents to avoid “the three Cs” — cramped spaces, crowded areas and close conversation.

The CDC’s guidance also explains that the closer and longer a person with COVID-19 is with others, the higher the risk of spreading the virus to those people. 

On Friday, the CDC also updated its testing guidance after nearly a month of controversy over the role of political interference from officials at the Department of Health and Human Services overriding the CDC’s scientists. In late August, the CDC’s website was quietly revised to say that people who had been exposed to someone with coronavirus but weren’t showing symptoms might not need testing. That caused an uproar among medical experts because asymptomatic people can easily spread the virus to others.

The new guidance now says, “Due to the significance of asymptomatic and pre-symptomatic transmission, this guidance further reinforces the need to test asymptomatic persons, including close contacts of a person with documented SARS-CoV-2 infection.”

Many public health experts have long advised that even asymptomatic people should be tested if they suspect they’ve been in contact with someone who was infected. In July, a model published by the National Academy of Sciences, showed an estimated 50% of coronavirus cases may be spread by people who aren’t showing symptoms. 

Lucy Craft contributed to this report.

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CDC abruptly removes guidance about airborne COVID-19 transmission, says update 'was posted in error' – CTV News

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The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Monday abruptly reverted to its previous guidance about how coronavirus is transmitted, removing language about airborne transmission it had posted just days earlier.

“A draft version of proposed changes to these recommendations was posted in error to the agency’s official website. CDC is currently updating its recommendations regarding airborne transmission of SARS-CoV-2 (the virus that causes COVID-19). Once this process has been completed, the update language will be posted,” Jason McDonald, a CDC spokesman, said in a response emailed to CNN.

The guidance had been quietly updated on Friday, according to the CDC’s website. CNN was first to report the change on Sunday. The CDC responded to CNN just before noon on Monday to say it was reverting to the previous guidance.

Despite several studies that have shown the novel coronavirus can spread through small particles in the air, the CDC page now says that Covid-19 is thought to spread mainly between people in close contact — about 6 feet — and “through respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs, sneezes or talks.” This is the same language it posted months ago.

In language posted Friday and now removed, CDC said Covid-19 most commonly spread between people who are in close contact with one another, and went on to say it’s known to spread “through respiratory droplets or small particles, such as those in aerosols, produced when an infected person coughs, sneezes, sings, talks or breathes.”

These particles can cause infection when “inhaled into the nose, mouth, airways, and lungs,” the agency said. “This is thought to be the main way the virus spreads.”

“There is growing evidence that droplets and airborne particles can remain suspended in the air and be breathed in by others, and travel distances beyond 6 feet (for example, during choir practice, in restaurants, or in fitness classes),” the page said in the Friday update, which has since been removed. “In general, indoor environments without good ventilation increase this risk.”

In the Friday update, the CDC had added new measures to protect yourself in others, including recommendations to use air purifiers to reduce airborne germs in indoors spaces and clear guidance to “stay at least 6 feet away from others, whenever possible.” The updated CDC page had also changed language around asymptomatic transmission, shifting from saying “some people without symptoms may be able to spread the virus” to saying “people who are infected but do not show symptoms can spread the virus to others.” That language has now been removed.

Also on Friday, CDC updated its coronavirus testing guidance to stress that anyone who has been in contact with an infected person should be tested for coronavirus. A controversial earlier update was not written by CDC scientists and posted online before it had undergone the normal scientific review process, two sources confirmed to CNN last week.

CNN reported last week that US Health and Human Services communications officials appointed by President Trump had recently pushed to change language of weekly science reports released by the CDC so as not to undermine Trump’s political message, according to a federal health official. Officials within HHS had defended the demand, saying the CDC fell under the agency’s umbrella and that all communications and public documents needed to be cleared at the top. CDC Director Dr. Robert Redfield said last week “at no time has the scientific integrity” of these reports been compromised.

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