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Manitobans make the best of a summer of coronavirus: ‘It’s been different’ – Global News

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Whether it was reading, gardening, or taking in a new part of the province, Manitobans seem to have made the best of a summer like no other.

With cases of COVID-19 continuing to rise here at home and around the world, summer vacation plans changed quickly for many in Manitoba as borders between provinces and into the U.S. closed and public health orders put restrictions on businesses.

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Travel Manitoba targeting locals and some neighbours with latest ad campaign

“It’s been different and it’s been very challenging,” Travel Manitoba president and CEO Colin Ferguson said of the sudden changes brought on by the pandemic.

“When COVID was first announced in March we were obviously, like everybody, very concerned about what that was going to mean.”

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1:49
Travel experts: Manitobans should consider extra steps before making plans


Travel experts: Manitobans should consider extra steps before making plans

Ferguson tells Global News the resulting closure of international borders has wreaked havoc for businesses in Manitoba that rely on seasonal visits from Americans and Europeans, like fly-in fishing camps and attractions in Churchill.

But Ferguson said Mantiobans have picked up some of the business lost to a lack of international travellers this summer.

It’s something Travel Manitoba had hoped to see after launching a hyper-local travel campaign aimed at those living in the Keystone province.

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The $2-million “Home Is Where The Heart Is” campaign included series of videos featuring actual Manitobans as they become ambassadors for the province’s destinations and experiences.

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The videos were complemented with a print, digital, radio, outdoor and social media campaign.

“There’s a lot to do here — so Winnipeggers and Manitobans are getting out and they’re experiencing it,” Ferguson said.

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In-province tourism key to Manitoba success during pandemic: Destination Canada

“The campgrounds, the parks, the golf courses are seeing huge increases in rounds played — places like Hecla, Clear Lake, Whiteshell, we are hearing things like best June, July and August ever.

“We know Manitobans are getting out and exploring.”

‘It was nice to have that time’

Winnipegger Charles Carron tells Global News he had a pretty busy summer, heading out hiking and camping right here in Manitoba.

“Definitely got a chance to get outside, do some hiking, I like to be outdoors as much as possible — I’ve got some friends that like to go hiking — so I took advantage of that,” he said.

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‘We’re devastated’: COVID-19 dries up tourism industry, thousands laid off in mountain towns

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Lorand Bashushki, on the other hand, said he had a great summer without leaving his backyard very often.

“I planted a garden for the first time in my life — put a whole bunch of flowers out on my front… and the garden’s in the back and I got a whole bunch of flowers inside the house too,” he said.






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Manitoba looking to attract travellers


Manitoba looking to attract travellers

Bashushki, who normally would have been working at IG Field if the CFL season hadn’t been cancelled, said he did venture out once this summer.

“We went to Kenora for about three hours for supper and came back… that’s about it,” he said with a laugh.

“Usually in the summer I would like to go somewhere like for real. Kenora was it this year.”

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Air travel from Manitoba to the U.S. may be legal, but experts say there may be complications

The change of pace brought on by the pandemic this summer was welcomed by Patrick Harney, who said he stayed in the city for the whole summer.

“I usually go away most summers and try and do something but it was nice to have a change from that sort of summer pressure of getting out, seeing people — I just had time for myself,” Harney tells Global News.






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Manitoba campgrounds noticing more trash with travel restricted


Manitoba campgrounds noticing more trash with travel restricted

“It was nice to have that time – I spent a lot of time reading books, reading books I never would’ve read over the summer.”

At Travel Manitoba, Ferguson says he’s hopeful Manitobans remember there’s a lot of things to do right here at home, once the pandemic is over.

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Read more:
Summer vacation options expand as coronavirus travel restrictions ease in Manitoba

“I think Manitobans, they’re looking for something and they’re either going to go out and rediscover places they haven’t been to… for many, many years, a long time — or they’re going to places they’ve never been to,” he said.

“I think this is going to be good to the long term — I think Winnipeggers and Manitobans are going to realize ‘there’s a lot to do in this province.”

— With files from Erik Pindera






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Traveling safely this summer amid the pandemic


Traveling safely this summer amid the pandemic

Questions about COVID-19? Here are some things you need to know:

Symptoms can include fever, cough and difficulty breathing — very similar to a cold or flu. Some people can develop a more severe illness. People most at risk of this include older adults and people with severe chronic medical conditions like heart, lung or kidney disease. If you develop symptoms, contact public health authorities.

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To prevent the virus from spreading, experts recommend frequent handwashing and coughing into your sleeve. They also recommend minimizing contact with others, staying home as much as possible and maintaining a distance of two metres from other people if you go out. In situations where you can’t keep a safe distance from others, public health officials recommend the use of a non-medical face mask or covering to prevent spreading the respiratory droplets that can carry the virus. In some provinces and municipalities across the country, masks or face coverings are now mandatory in indoor public spaces.

For full COVID-19 coverage from Global News, click here.

© 2020 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

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Daily new COVID-19 cases triple in past month; more schools hit – Kamloops This Week

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TORONTO — A dramatic tripling of daily new cases of COVID-19 in the past month, mostly among young people, has prompted the prime minister to declare the arrival of the second wave of the pandemic and that Canadians likely won’t be able to gather for Thanksgiving.

“In our four biggest provinces, the second wave isn’t just starting, it’s already underway,” Justin Trudeau said Wednesday evening in a rare television address to the nation.

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“We’re on the brink of a fall that could be much worse than the spring.”

Trudeau said Canadians can’t do anything to change the numbers now, or even tomorrow.

“But what we can change is where we are in October, and into the winter,” he said.

“It’s all too likely we won’t be gathering for Thanksgiving, but we still have a shot at Christmas.”

Canada’s chief public health officer, Dr. Theresa Tam, said the country had seen an average of more than 1,100 new cases of the novel coronavirus a day this past week compared with about 380 a day in mid-August.

“Canada is at a crossroads with the COVID-19 epidemic trajectory,” Tam said before Trudeau’s address. “Unless public health and individual protective measures are strengthened and we work together to slow the spread of the virus, the situation is on track for a big resurgence in a number of provinces.”

While the new cases were primarily among young adults, more than 400 schools in Quebec and another 153 in Ontario reported at least one case of the illness. The figures from the group COVID Ecoles Quebec and the Ontario government came as authorities seek ways to curb the spread of COVID-19 among younger people.

Data from Ontario show cases among those in their 20s have risen sharply in the past month, with one expert attributing the increase in part to the reopening of schools and universities.

In an effort to tackle the problem, several provinces, cities and universities have warned of stiff fines for violating anti-COVID restrictions. However, Quebec said it would not allow police to enter homes without a warrant to break up gatherings that violate the measures.

The worrisome upward trend in new cases came as the federal Liberal government laid out its plan to take on the second wave.

“To prevent small clusters from becoming major outbreaks, communities may need to enact short-term closure orders,” the government said in its throne speech.

Stringent lockdowns in the spring caused unprecedented economic disruption, prompting the government to spend tens of billions of dollars on supports as unemployment skyrocketed.

The throne speech promised, among other things, an extension of the federal wage-subsidy program until next summer, more aid for businesses and help to boost testing capacity. People in various cities have waited for hours or even days for virus testing. Safety concerns led a hospital in Kitchener, Ont., to close its drive-thru testing centre as people arrived in the wee hours.

In all, COVID-19 has killed about 9,250 people in Canada, while the cumulative case count has been edging toward the 150,000 mark.

Quebec, with more than 69,000 cases, accounts for about 48 per cent of the total cases but 63 per cent of the deaths. Ontario’s more than 48,000 reported cases account for 33 per cent nationally, and 31 per cent of fatalities

On Wednesday, Quebec reported 471 new cases. Another four reported deaths from the novel coronavirus brought the province’s total fatalities to 5,809.

Ontario, which has shown a steady increase in new cases since mid-August, after months of declines, reported 335 new cases Wednesday and another three deaths. Almost 70 per cent of new infections were in people under the age of 40.

Concern is also mounting as more long-term care homes in Ontario, brutally hit by the virus earlier in the year, report outbreaks. Almost 70 per cent of fatalities have been among those aged 80 and older and another 27 per cent were 60 to 79 years of age.

While older people and those with underlying health conditions are more susceptible to severe illnesses from SARS-CoV-2, younger people can spread the disease — often before showing any symptoms.

“When there’s so much in the community, it can escalate into the populations with more vulnerability,” Dr. Vera Etches, medical officer of health in Ottawa, one of the harder hit cities, said.

Ontario data indicates new cases among people in their 20s have reached similar levels to those seen among people in their 80s in mid-April. Along with school reopenings, Dr. Brian Ward, a professor of medicine at McGill University, cited bars and parties as key factors, along with a “general sense of invulnerability” among younger people.

“COVID fatigue also clearly plays a role,” Ward said.

Winnipeg, for example, accounted for 30 of Manitoba’s 42 new cases reported Wednesday, with possible exposures at restaurants, bars and a pub trivia night, the province said.

Trudeau sympathized with Canadians feeling the stress of a second wave, but urged people to be strong.

“‘Can’t’ will not define us,” he said.

“We can bend the curve. We can build a stronger future. We can define the change.”

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Sept. 23, 2020.

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Saskatchewan health officials fine person $2000 for not self-isolating while symptomatic – WellandTribune.ca

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REGINA—Saskatchewan health officials have fined a person $2,000 for not self-isolating while showing symptoms of COVID-19, bringing the total amount of penalties levied in the province to more than $20,000.

The Ministry of Health has not released specific details about the recent case, except to say the penalty was imposed after a contact tracing investigation.

“Public health is confident that all close contacts have been determined and contacted in this case,” reads a statement from the Ministry of Health.

Public health rules state people must isolate for 14 days if they return from international travel, are diagnosed with COVID-19 or have been close to someone who is positive.

Officials said the recent violation was of a section of the provincial public health order that states all symptomatic people who have been directed to get a COVID-19 test, or are awaiting their results, must isolate until they are no longer deemed a risk.

The Saskatchewan Health Authority said asymptomatic people being tested are only required to self-monitor.

“As there is no further public risk, we will not be releasing additional information about this enforcement,” said the statement.

A spokesperson said officials have issued four fines related to violations around COVID-19 precautions, including the one announced Thursday.

Recently, an organizer of a private gathering at a home in Saskatoon, where about 47 people attended, was fined $2,000. Another $2,000 fine was handed to a person who didn’t self-isolate, despite being positive for COVID-19.

A $10,000 penalty was given to a business that was open when restrictions were in place.

“Fines are not our first choice; we want people to be responsible and protect their health and the health of the friends, family and community,” Colleen Book said in an email.

“There can be very serious consequences for not following Public Health Orders and we are seeing increasing transmission rates in Saskatchewan and across the country as a result of social gatherings (weddings, parties etc.). This is putting our schools, businesses and health facilities at risk.”

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Saskatchewan reported five new infections on Thursday. Officials said of the more than 1,800 cases reported to date in the province, 130 are believed to be active.

There are 24 active infections of children since schools reopened earlier this month.

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Saskatchewan officials fine person $2000 for not self-isolating while symptomatic – The Observer

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REGINA — Saskatchewan health officials have fined a person $2,000 for not self-isolating while showing symptoms of COVID-19, bringing the total amount of penalties levied in the province to more than $20,000.

The Ministry of Health has not released specific details about the recent case, except to say the penalty was imposed after a contact tracing investigation.

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“Public health is confident that all close contacts have been determined and contacted in this case,” reads a statement from the Ministry of Health.

Public health rules state people must isolate for 14 days if they return from international travel, are diagnosed with COVID-19 or have been close to someone who is positive.

Officials said the recent violation was of a section of the provincial public health order that states all symptomatic people who have been directed to get a COVID-19 test, or are awaiting their results, must isolate until they are no longer deemed a risk.

The Saskatchewan Health Authority said asymptomatic people being tested are only required to self-monitor.

“As there is no further public risk, we will not be releasing additional information about this enforcement,” said the statement.

A spokeswoman said officials have issued four fines related to violations around COVID-19 precautions, including the one announced Thursday.

Recently, an organizer of a private gathering at a home in Saskatoon, where about 47 people attended, was fined $2,000. Another $2,000 fine was handed to a person who didn’t self-isolate, despite being positive for COVID-19.

A $10,000 penalty was given to a business that was open when restrictions were in place.

“Fines are not our first choice; we want people to be responsible and protect their health and the health of the friends, family and community,” Colleen Book said in an email.

“There can be very serious consequences for not following Public Health Orders and we are seeing increasing transmission rates in Saskatchewan and across the country as a result of social gatherings (weddings, parties etc.). This is putting our schools, businesses and health facilities at risk.”

Saskatchewan reported five new infections on Thursday. Officials said of the more than 1,800 cases reported to date in the province, 130 are believed to be active.

There are 24 active infections of children since schools reopened earlier this month.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Sept. 24, 2020

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