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Maotik and La Prairie Invite Art Lovers into the Cobalt Night – Cultured Magazine

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Skincare brand La Prairie has an ongoing commitment to the pursuit of “timeless beauty,” and backs that commitment financially, supporting a range of scientific and artistic initiatives in its home country of Switzerland. Since 2017, the company has partnered with the world’s leading art fair, Art Basel, annually commissioning a new piece, which allows an artist to creatively express their interpretation of the brand’s values.

With the growing popularity of the “immersive art experience” growing around the world, there’s an arms race amongst artists to do everything they can to enhance the viewer’s—or is it participant’s?—connection to an artwork. Thus, this year’s La Prairie commission by French digital artist Maotik utilizes an exceptionally wide range of motion sensors, video projectors and other advanced technology to render a remarkable immersion that “plunges the viewer into the depths of night,” according to the artist.

Silhouette of a woman illuminated by a blue light at the Sense of Blue installation.

Sense of Blue, 2021 by Maotik. Photography by Pierre Mouton, courtesy of La Prairie.

Titled Sense of Blue, the work is described as “an ode to the night in Cobalt Blue,” a color indeed one of the most evocative and sensuous in existence. Maotik’s aim is full engagement, but he starts off gently, drawing you in to the evening light. Then come the fireworks, the increasing darkness, excitement and ultimately, serenity. Maotik’s use of self-generating algorithms means that Sense of Blue is truly a unique experience, no two people have the same one. Combining light and dark, color and sound, he has utilized technology to create an abstract version of nature at her most intense and mysterious. He forces your mind to wander, encouraging you to free your senses. Is this our world, or some alternate universe he has created? It’s up to each viewer to decide.

Maotik’s piece was created for La Prairie, for which Cobalt Blue has special significance as featured in the design of its Skin Caviar Collection, a line that has always resembled a work of art in and of itself. The brand gave the artist free range to explore the meanings inherent in this evocative color, inspired by their newest creation, Skin Caviar Nighttime Oil.

Clearly the artist and the skincare company are simpatico in their minimalist design aesthetic and their connection to nature. But the two also connect on another level, in their embrace of science and technology. The high-tech nature of Maotik’s work is obvious, but La Prairie is also a brand on the cutting edge, with a team of scientists  constantly exploring the possibilities of nature.

Photograph of Greg Prodromides of la prairie and Maotik standing in front of an illuminated installation.

Maotik (left) and Greg Prodromides of La Prairie.

Working with one of my favorite foodstuffs in the world—caviar—they have discovered a rare, natural occurrence of Retinol, which is famously unmatched for its line-smoothing efficacy. When used at night, Skin Caviar Nighttime Oil works in conjunction with your own skin to stimulate collagen synthesis. But its most important use is probably to seal in moisture you might otherwise lose in the night, and therefore increase skin vitality.

Historically, the relationship between artists and patrons has always been an important one. When a collaboration can boost both parties while providing a stunning experience for thousands of viewers, everyone benefits. Sense of Blue invites the viewer into the cobalt night where mysteries, beauty and a chance to open one’s mind await.

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Let's Art Teen returns to Cultural Centre – Energeticcity.ca

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The Let’s Art program received a $2,000 donation from the Rotary Club of Fort St. John last year. The donation covered 100 hours of arts instruction offered at the North Peace Cultural Centre.

Registration is required for the program, which can be done by calling the NPCC at 250-785-1992 or emailing reception@npcc.bc.ca.

The program is also offered for kids aged six to 12, however, the 2021 session took place in March.

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Art Beat: It's Art Crawl weekend – Coast Reporter

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The 2021 Sunshine Coast Art Crawl kicks off Friday, Oct. 22 at 10 a.m., with 164 venues open to visitors until 5 p.m. all three days, through Sunday. And at 10 of those venues (as of press time), Friday evening from 7 to 9 p.m. will also be a time for celebration. Most of the partying is at Gibsons venues, but Redecor + Design (venue #111) on Cowrie Street in Sechelt will also be open, as are Halfmoon Bay venues The Mink Farm Gallery (#146), and Kito Tosetti (#147). Details are at the “Friday Night Parties” link at sunshinecoastartcrawl.com.

Art of Healing

The Sechelt Hospital Foundation’s Art of Healing campaign holds its Gala on Saturday, Oct. 23 at the Sunshine Coast Botanical Garden (venue #126). That’s where 36 works donated by some great local artists are on display and will be distributed in an exclusive online raffle draw to 36 ticketholders. All visitors to the exhibit can also bid on auction packages, and purchase raffle tickets for the grand travel prizes, among them a grand prize of a trip for two to Venice or any other European destination.

Sechelt Arts Festival

It’s also the final weekend of the Sechelt Arts Festival, with the premiere of the play, Voices, at Raven’s Cry Theatre. There will be three performances, Friday night, Oct. 22, Saturday night, and a Sunday matinee. The visual art and heritage canoe displays at Seaside Centre become Art Crawl venue #115. Poet Valerie Mason-John speaks in a free event (registration required) at Raven’s Cry on Saturday at 11:30 a.m. And your last chance to add your touch to the Paintillio mural at Trail Bay Centre will also be on Saturday, until 4 p.m. Info and tickets at the festival website.

New writers’ group

The Sunshine Coast Writers and Editors Society is holding its first meeting on Friday, Oct. 22 at 7 p.m., via Zoom. The society’s purpose is “to serve writers, editors and groups on the Sunshine Coast to grow and develop their skills, as well as support other writers’ groups and events in the province and across Canada,” and “to hold events and launch projects to highlight the incredible talent that exists on the Coast.” Contact Cathalynn Cindy Labonte-Smith at 604-724-3534 for a Zoom link.

Meet the author

Writer Jennie Tschoban will be signing copies of her funny and touching memoir, Tales & Lies My Baba Told Me, on Saturday, Oct. 23, from 1 to 3 p.m. at Daffadowndilly Boutique & Gallery, on Marine Drive in Gibsons.

Meet the artists

On Sunday, Oct. 24 starting at 2 p.m., Jennifer Bryant and Jennifer Ireland will talk about their new exhibit, Matters of Scale, on now at the Sunshine Coast Arts Council’s Doris Crowston Gallery in Sechelt.

Live Music

The band Astral Motion bring their blend of originals and classics to Roberts Creek Legion on Friday, Oct. 22 at 7 p.m. On Saturday, Oct. 23 at the Creek Legion, Vancouver acoustic band Farmteam start their sets at 7:30 p.m.

The Locals play the Turf Stage at Tapworks in Gibsons on Saturday, Oct. 23, 2:30 to 4:30 p.m. On Wednesday, Oct. 27, Vancouver singer-songwriter Eamon McGrath plays Tapworks at 8 p.m.

At the Gibsons Legion on Saturday, Oct. 23, Poppa Greg and the band kick things off at 7:30 p.m.

At the Clubhouse Restaurant in Pender Harbour, catch Half Cut and the Slackers on Sunday, Oct. 24, from 2 to 5 p.m.

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ArtCity: Art education in the gallery (and virtual) space – Woodstock Sentinel Review

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In September, I returned to the Woodstock Art Gallery as the assistant curator of education intern, eager to actively bridge arts programming within the permanent collection and the public.

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In September, I returned to the Woodstock Art Gallery as the assistant curator of education intern, eager to actively bridge arts programming within the permanent collection and the public. I have been involved with the gallery for three years, beginning as a co-op student with the education department in 2018 and then as the curatorial and collections assistant in 2019 and 2020. In my previous position, I worked exclusively in a background role curating exhibitions and assisting in collections management. With this new role as assistant curator of education, however, I was able to once again rekindle my interest in bringing the arts to the local community.

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This position, of course, comes with unique challenges during a pandemic. Everything that we once considered emblematic of educational programming – in-person classroom trips, tours and studio events – has been put on pause in an abundance of caution. Over the last year and a half, the staff at the Woodstock Art Gallery have created online lessons and educational resources, virtual exhibitions and other online activities for the public. In addition, artist talks, curator webinars and exhibition openings have all been streamed virtually. It is within these unique circumstances that I began my new position in the education department.

The role of assistant curator of education is a fairly recent addition to the Woodstock Art Gallery staff roster. Created in 2018, this short-term internship aids the education and curatorial departments in realizing public programming. Previous interns have curated exhibitions, written a practical accessibility guide, conducted research and led education programming. The education department’s current goals had to be completely reoriented to accommodate the pandemic, however. Virtual resources are being further developed and made accessible to both the public and teachers alike. As collaboration with the curatorial department at the Woodstock Art Gallery has become a central component of arts education programming, alternative methods to experience exhibitions are also currently in the works.

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The future of education programming, however, will not remain entirely within a virtual space. There is a unique value to in-person programming that staff at the Woodstock Art Gallery yearn to return to. Releasing Community Creation Kits and art grab bags throughout this past year, for instance, has been a way to bring art-making materials back into the hands of the public during the toughest restrictions. Now as lockdowns slowly ease and restrictions lessen, we have begun to return to in-person educational programming.

In September, the gallery hosted its first Creative PA day program since the beginning of the pandemic with a small group of kids. The day was filled with the arts as we toured exhibitions, visited the park, and explored lessons in sculpture making. By the end of the day, each child brought home their sculpture and multimedia creations, along with the tools to create more. Building upon this successful day, the education department will slowly begin to roll out more in-person programming, including another Creative PA Day in November. But this, of course, will take time.

Throughout this pandemic, educational programming has taken on many forms – from entirely virtual resources to at-home art kits and PA days, educational programming has required innovation and creativity. The future of education will forever be shaped by the lessons learned during the pandemic and will perhaps take on a whole new form that has yet to be explored.

Julia deKwant is the assistant curator of education intern at the Woodstock Art Gallery. The Woodstock Art Gallery acknowledges the support for this position which is funded by Young Canada Works at Building Careers in Heritage.

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