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Media Beat: March 01, 2021 | FYIMusicNews – FYI Music News

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Quebecor reports Q4 profit up from year ago

The overall increase came as telecommunications revenue rose to $940.9 million, up from $908.6 million a year ago.

However, Quebecor’s media division saw revenue fall to $185.8 million from $208.0 million a year ago and sports and entertainment revenue dropped to $48.8 million compared with $54.7 million in the fourth quarter of 2019. – The Canadian Press

Pay for news? If anything, the news business should be paying Facebook and Google

If linking is stealing, why is every article on every news site adorned with a clickable button at the top urging readers to “share” it on Facebook, Twitter and other social-media sites? Why, indeed, do news organizations post links on these sites themselves? The same reason they invest so heavily in “search engine optimization,” to ensure their pages rank highly on Google and other search sites. Because their services are of benefit to us, driving readers to our pages that we can convert into subscriptions and/or advertising sales. – Andrew Coyne, The Globe and Mail

Broadcasters, Netflix at odds on regulatory changes

Executives from Canada’s major broadcasters and a Netflix official spoke before a parliamentary committee on Friday, saying changes need to be made to bring Canada’s broadcasting landscape into the 21st century.

Where they differed, however, was in how best to go about it. – Rachel Gilmore, Global News

Canada should follow Australia’s lead in copyright enforcement

Every year I receive a federal cheque for the use of my published books by Canadian libraries. The amount, after payment of hefty income taxes, is no more than several months’ supply of Tim Hortons coffee. But I do appreciate recognition of the principle that I should be compensated for my copyright.

As a “content-provider,” I think of this cheque every time I read about the tussle now taking place between Australia and the massive technology companies, Google and Facebook. Australia is bringing in legislation requiring digital technology companies to compensate news outlets for the use of their content. The legislation is in response to the shift of advertising revenue from broadcasters and publishers to internet platforms that so far have not had to pay the costs of creating content. In response, Facebook has clumsily cut off news information to Australians, raising significant concerns about the big tech firms’ economic power, not just in Australia but around the world. – Jack M. Mintz, Financial Post

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Canadian retail rents drop as office space hits a high

Despite the work from home trend gaining steam, Canadian companies are paying more for office space. Canada saw office rents climb 0.49% in Q4 2020, and is now up 1.29% from the same quarter a year before. This brings Canada’s office space pricing to a new record high. – Kaitlin Last, Better Dwelling

This indie rocker and designer is a rebel with a social cause

In her 20s, Lauralee Sheehan immersed herself in the music scene, writing music and collaborating with a wide community of composers and publishers, eventually helping to form the Lovely Killbots, where she recognized the importance of branding and began to explore the available technology and social media to put their name out there. Today, Sheehan is founder and chief creative officer of Digital 55, a successful digital media content studio in Toronto. – Denise Deveau, Financial Post

‘The Crown,’ ‘Schitt’s Creek’ take Golden Globes TV honours

Netflix Inc’s British royal drama “The Crown,” which focused its most recent season on the troubled marriage of Prince Charles and Princess Diana, led the television honors at Hollywood’s Golden Globe awards on Sunday.

“The Crown” was named best TV drama, one of four awards in total, including best actress for Emma Corrin, who played the young Diana struggling to adapt to life in the royal family.

Feel-good comedy “Schitt’s Creek” landed the Golden Globes trophy for best TV comedy series, along with best comedy actress for Catherine O’Hara. And Netflix’s “The Queen’s Gambit,” about a female chess champion battling drug and alcohol addiction, won best limited series and best actress for Anya Taylor-Joy. – Reuters

Inside the SCTV writers’ room with Eugene Levy

For Eugene Levy and his SCTV colleagues, a day at the office in 1983 was just like a normal workday — except for the laughter. – CBC Archives

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Black Canadians face high unemployment during the pandemic

Differences in the unemployment rates of diverse groups of Canadians are attributable to a number of factors, including long-term trends, the age of the population and the unequal impact of COVID-19 on certain sectors of the economy.

Black Canadians experienced a higher unemployment rate than non-visible minority Canadians in the recent past. For example, 12.5% of Black Canadians in the labour force were unemployed at the time of the 2016 Census, compared with 6.9% of non-visible minority Canadians.

Experimental estimates from the LFS suggest that from January 2020 to January 2021, the unemployment rate increased more among Black Canadians (+5.3 percentage points) than among non-visible minority Canadians (+3.7 percentage points) in the context of the pandemic (monthly estimates).

In the three months ending in January 2021, the unemployment rate among Black Canadians (13.1%) was about 70% higher than that among non-visible minority Canadians (7.7%).

Black Canadians aged 25 to 54 also had a higher unemployment rate than non-visible minority Canadians in the same age group (9.4% versus 6.1%).

Black youth aged 15 to 24 have experienced high unemployment during the pandemic, as almost one-third of the labour force in this group (30.6%) was unemployed in January 2021—almost twice the rate of non-visible minority youth (15.6%). – Statistics Canada

Cuban musicians and artists collaborate on viral, political music video

The “Patria y Vida” video is spreading like wildfire in Cuba and Miami, a sign of widespread discontent on the island as well as unity among Cubans. – Coco Fusco, Hyperallergic

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Fall: The mystery of Robert Maxwell

From the bestselling author of A Very English Scandal, the jaw-dropping life story of the notorious business tycoon Robert Maxwell.

In February 1991, the media mogul and former MP Robert Maxwell made a triumphant entrance into Manhattan harbour aboard his yacht, the Lady Ghislaine, to complete his purchase of the ailing New York Daily News. Crowds lined the quayside to watch his arrival, taxi drivers stopped their cabs to shake his hand and children asked for his autograph. But just ten months later, Maxwell disappeared from the same yacht off the Canary Islands, only to be found dead in the water soon afterward.

Maxwell was the embodiment of Britain’s post-war boom. Born an Orthodox Jew, he had escaped the Nazi occupation of Czechoslovakia, fought in World War 2, and was decorated for his heroism with the Military Cross. He went on to become a Labour MP and an astonishingly successful businessman, owning a number of newspapers and publishing companies. But on his death, his empire fell apart, as long-hidden debts and unscrupulous dealings came to light. Within a few days, Maxwell was being reviled as the embodiment of greed and corruption. No one had ever fallen so far and so quickly.

What went so wrong? How did a war hero and model of society become reduced to a bloated, amoral wreck? In this gripping book, John Preston delivers the definitive account of Maxwell’s extraordinary rise and scandalous fall. –  Amazon books

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Covid vaccine players will split $100B in sales and $40B in profits

Financial Times reports that Pfizer expects about $15 billion in revenue this year from its Covid-19 vaccine and has raised its 2021 profit guidance on hopes that having one of the first and most effective vaccines will boost its prospects. Longtime Evercore ISI pharma analyst Josh Schimmer figures the total market for the vaccines could be worth $100B in sales and yield $40B in post-tax profits. According to a report in Fierce Pharma, Moderna scored a $1.5B deal with the (US) federal government to supply 100 million doses of its mRNA vaccine, if it succeeds, with the option for another 400 million doses. That suggests the price per dose for government purchases would be less than $25. In the same publication it is reported that Pfizer also has a supply deal with the U.S. government, which is worth $1.95 billion for 100 million doses. The company is testing a two-dose regimen of its mRNA vaccine for COVID-19, which one analyst estimated could bring in $15 billion in profits for the drug maker.

Statista: The 20 countries with the highest public debt in 2020 in relation to the gross domestic product

Password managers have a security flaw

You would, naturally, think the password manager was safe when locked, but it’s not, according to the ISE. Worryingly, the researchers found that in some circumstances, the master password was residing in the computer’s memory in a plain text readable format.  And once the master password is available to the attacker, they can decrypt the password manager database. – Kate O’Flaherty, Forbes

RIP

Jeff Ansell, a reporter, an MIT-Harvard instructor, media coach and more recently head of Jeff Ansell & Associates, died of cancer on Tuesday, February 23 at Toronto’s Sunnybrook Hospital. As an investigative reporter, he exposed two Nazi war criminals who murdered 16,000 people. He talked about this in an Andrew Krystal Sirius XM broadcast three years ago that is included below, and an affectionate recollection of his life and times was penned by Steve Paikin, anchor of TVO’s flagship current affairs program, The Agenda with Steve Paikin.

John Burks’ tenure atop the masthead of Rolling Stone was brief, but he made it count, reshaping what was essentially a trade magazine for rock fans into a wider voice for the counterculture and antiwar movement. His timing was right and his instincts sharp, as made evident when Rolling Stone, a biweekly at the time, published the definitive account of the disaster that was Altamont in December 1969. He died Feb. 17 at age 83. – Sam Whiting, San Francisco Chronicle

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Social media companies targeted in potential online harms bill, but legislation still a ways off – The Globe and Mail

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The federal government has launched a new consultation that it says will lead to combatting online hate shared on social media sites – a move that has prompted advocates to say real change isn’t coming fast enough.

The government is asking the public to respond to a proposal that includes creating a new Digital Safety Commissioner of Canada, as well as a Digital Recourse Council that Canadians can petition in order to have content removed from social media sites. The Recourse Council would have the power to make binding decisions to make sites remove content, though the consequences for not abiding by that ruling are not yet clear.

The plans, announced Thursday, focus on five categories of online harms: terrorist content, hate speech, content that incites violence, child sexual exploitation and the non-consensual sharing of images.

As government hosts antisemitism summit, opposition leaders say they should have been invited to speak

The government says it wants to bring in legislation on online hate, aimed at social media companies that play a role in sharing content. It would be in addition to Bill C-36, which targeted public hate speech by individuals. Bill C-36 did not pass into law after being introduced by the Liberal government at the end of the parliamentary session. If an election is called this summer, as is widely expected, the legislation will no longer move forward.

Despite a campaign being anticipated soon, Canadian Heritage Minister Steven Guilbeault said the new online harms bill would be introduced as a top priority “very early on when the House resumes its work in the fall.”

“We’re hearing loud and clear from Canadians that something needs to be done about online hate,” Mr. Guilbeault said in an interview.

“What we’re presenting is what we feel is the best course forward, but we want to hear Canadians on that, and that’s what we’ll be doing in the coming weeks.”

The government has posted details of its proposed approach on the Canadian Heritage section of its website and is asking the public to provide feedback by e-mail. The potential legislation would apply to sites such as Twitter, Facebook and YouTube, but would exclude private communication channels such as WhatsApp and telecommunications networks.

Bernie Farber, chair of the Canadian Anti-Hate Network, said creating online hate legislation would be a positive move. However, he said that at the moment it’s only “a plan to make a plan.”

“It should not have taken this long and it should not be taking any longer,” he said. “My fear is that an election is going to get called and this just gets swept away into partisan politics and people forget about it.”

Mr. Farber also raised the issue of how the process of dealing with online hate still heavily relies on victims self-reporting to have content removed, and said he’d like to see more of the onus fall on a new commissioner instead.

Daniel Bernhard, executive director of the advocacy group Friends of Canadian Broadcasting, said in a statement that platforms such as Facebook and YouTube must be held responsible for their role in promoting illegal content on their sites. “Legislation aimed at tackling online harm must send a clear message to these firms and their leaders: if you allow illegal content to circulate on your platform, you will pay a price,” the statement reads.

Rob Moore, Conservative Shadow Minister for Justice and the Attorney General of Canada, said in an e-mailed statement Thursday that his party is “deeply concerned with the Liberal’s plan to create an online speech regulator whose powers are overly broad and ill-defined.”

Know what is happening in the halls of power with the day’s top political headlines and commentary as selected by Globe editors (subscribers only). Sign up today.

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Social Reset promotes healthy social media usage – Belleville Intelligencer

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In a world dominated by online algorithms, Social Reset is working to free people from social media and help them develop a healthier relationship with the internet.

Its campaign begins in August. Those participating will team up by pledging to reduce their social media usage for the entire month. One of Social Reset’s founders, Jordan Wiener, hopes this smartphone-less time facilitates meaningful connections with loved ones.

“The idea is that you get more time connecting with each other offline,” he said. “(Social Reset) is really not about, you know, raising money or doing any of this. It’s about putting down your phone, going outside and making memories with your friends and family.”

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Wiener is one of several Queen’s University alumni behind Social Reset; its current 10 volunteers and 14 ambassadors are primarily composed of former and current students. A shared desire to act in the face of complacency unites them.

“(Social Reset) started out of a frustration between the awareness of the social media problem and the action,” Wiener said. “I’d speak to friends for an hour, but I’d follow up with them a month later, and no one had done anything about it.”

He blames the design of social media apps for this dissonance.

“Everyone knows that this is a problem, but it’s something that’s really hard to do something about because these platforms can be so addictive.”

Social Reset is how Wiener and colleagues are fighting for change. In partnering with Jack.org and the Centre for Humane Technology, they’ve created an initiative to help participants re-evaluate their relationship with social media.

Pledging can be done individually or as a group. Social Reset’s website offers different pathways for people pledging alone, with a group of friends, or with family. All pledges will receive a weekly “Adventure Guide” containing ideas for smartphone-free activities.

While Wiener lives happily without any social media, he recognizes how platforms such as Instagram and TikTok can often become creative outlets. He believes that intention is central in developing a healthy relationship with them.

“So instead of compulsively checking your phone and going on and watching things that you don’t know why you’re watching, you (should) say, ‘I’m using social media for this’ and then use it strictly for that purpose,” Wiener explained.

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He warned that without intention, social media ends up using its users.

“(Otherwise) they’ve got you addicted to the algorithm, and they’re profiting off of you for each second that you spend on the platform,” he said.

The Social Reset team has also been teaching purposeful social media usage in classrooms through an educational workshop. It has interactive programming for all ages, but children in grades 7 and 8 have been their primary focus.

“We’re youth presenting this workshop to other youth,” Wiener said. “We explain how social media can be an awesome thing but also challenging. Then we leave the class to come up with their own ‘creative contract’ of rules that they’re going to impose and try for a week.”

These rules chosen by the children can be anything from not using phones before bed to dedicating more screen-free time to family.

“A week after they’ve done that, we come back in with them, and for 45 minutes everyone just kind of shares their experiences,” Wiener said.

Through its August campaign and educational workshops, Social Reset is working hard to improve our relationship with social media.

Those interested in pledging can find more information at thesocialreset.org.

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Social Reset promotes healthy social media usage – The Kingston Whig-Standard

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Article content

In a world dominated by online algorithms, Social Reset is working to free people from social media and help them develop a healthier relationship with the internet.

Its campaign begins in August. Those participating will team up by pledging to reduce their social media usage for the entire month. One of Social Reset’s founders, Jordan Wiener, hopes this smartphone-less time facilitates meaningful connections with loved ones.

“The idea is that you get more time connecting with each other offline,” he said. “(Social Reset) is really not about, you know, raising money or doing any of this. It’s about putting down your phone, going outside and making memories with your friends and family.”

Advertisement

Article content

Wiener is one of several Queen’s University alumni behind Social Reset; its current 10 volunteers and 14 ambassadors are primarily composed of former and current students. A shared desire to act in the face of complacency unites them.

“(Social Reset) started out of a frustration between the awareness of the social media problem and the action,” Wiener said. “I’d speak to friends for an hour, but I’d follow up with them a month later, and no one had done anything about it.”

He blames the design of social media apps for this dissonance.

“Everyone knows that this is a problem, but it’s something that’s really hard to do something about because these platforms can be so addictive.”

Social Reset is how Wiener and colleagues are fighting for change. In partnering with Jack.org and the Centre for Humane Technology, they’ve created an initiative to help participants re-evaluate their relationship with social media.

Pledging can be done individually or as a group. Social Reset’s website offers different pathways for people pledging alone, with a group of friends, or with family. All pledges will receive a weekly “Adventure Guide” containing ideas for smartphone-free activities.

While Wiener lives happily without any social media, he recognizes how platforms such as Instagram and TikTok can often become creative outlets. He believes that intention is central in developing a healthy relationship with them.

“So instead of compulsively checking your phone and going on and watching things that you don’t know why you’re watching, you (should) say, ‘I’m using social media for this’ and then use it strictly for that purpose,” Wiener explained.

Advertisement

Article content

He warned that without intention, social media ends up using its users.

“(Otherwise) they’ve got you addicted to the algorithm, and they’re profiting off of you for each second that you spend on the platform,” he said.

The Social Reset team has also been teaching purposeful social media usage in classrooms through an educational workshop. It has interactive programming for all ages, but children in grades 7 and 8 have been their primary focus.

“We’re youth presenting this workshop to other youth,” Wiener said. “We explain how social media can be an awesome thing but also challenging. Then we leave the class to come up with their own ‘creative contract’ of rules that they’re going to impose and try for a week.”

These rules chosen by the children can be anything from not using phones before bed to dedicating more screen-free time to family.

“A week after they’ve done that, we come back in with them, and for 45 minutes everyone just kind of shares their experiences,” Wiener said.

Through its August campaign and educational workshops, Social Reset is working hard to improve our relationship with social media.

Those interested in pledging can find more information at thesocialreset.org.

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