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Media Beat: October 14, 2021 | FYIMusicNews – FYI Music News

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Jonathan Pie’s latest hilariously offensive rant about Boris and his U-turn party

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William Shatner’s ultimate Captain Kirk performance

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SiriusXM links with Audio Up to develop scripted podcasts

The US podcast content production company has a roster of marquee names it is bringing to the satellite broadcaster, including James Ellroy, Stephen King, Machine Gun Kelly, and Gary Busey. The deal includes The Playboy Interview series featuring actors voicing the transcripts from Hugh Hefner’s once famous magazine.

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Canada’s wireless costs ‘continue to be among the highest in the world’

Tefficient, a Swedish telecom market analyst, found in a July study that Canadian data rates were the highest of 45 countries surveyed. Perhaps unsurprisingly, the analysis also found that Canadians were the most miserly with their mobile data.

Last year, a study of international cellphone prices by The Markup, a New York data journalism non-profit, also found Canada in the clear lead in terms of mobile rates. Loading an hour of Netflix using Canadian mobile data was found to cost an average of $12.55, as compared to 43 cents in Italy. – Tristin Hopper, National Post

Do News publishers “own” the news, and how should they be compensated?

Google and Facebook have grudgingly come to the table and begun discussions with some publishers in some countries over payment for use of content. Threat of government action has been the catalyst to make these negotiations happen. While progress is being made in terms of indirectly flowing back to news publishers some of the advertising revenues that their content generates for the platforms by attracting and retaining users, this begs the question of what the news content providers are actually “selling”, and what they actually “own”. At the end of the day, who owns the news? – Hugh Stephens’ Blog

Not a joke: Trump was going to appoint Ivanka president of the WTB

Back in 2019, as only the patriarch of the world’s most delusional family could, Donald Trump told The Atlantic about all the jobs that he’d wanted to give his daughter Ivanka, ones for which she wasn’t even qualified to do an unpaid internship. Ambassador to the United Nations? Ivanka “would’ve been great,” just “incredible” at the job, Trump explained to reporter Elaina Plott. “I even thought of Ivanka for the World Bank,” he added. “She would’ve been great at that because she’s very good with numbers. She’s got a great calmness…I’ve seen her under tremendous stress and pressure. She reacts very well—that’s usually a genetic thing, but it’s one of those things, nevertheless. She’s got a tremendous presence when she walks into the room.”

At the time these asides just seemed like the typical pronouncements of a guy whose most dominant features are his pathological inability to ever tell the truth and his creepy obsession with his eldest daughter, which, just a few months later, would result in his boldly and insanely claiming she’d created 14 million jobs. But according to a new report, Trump was actually dead serious about naming Ivanka, of the Ivanka Trump clothing line, the president of the World Bank—and had to be stopped from doing so. – Bess Levin, Vanity Fair via The Intercept

Roku remains on top of US CTV device market

Roku remains the top CTV platform in the US, accounting for 51.7% of CTV users. But Amazon Fire TV is much closer now with a penetration rate of nearly 45% among CTV users. Apple TV’s penetration is pretty low compared with the rest, at only 13.1% of US CTV users. – Sara Lebow, eMarketer

The one part of the OZY story podcasters can’t afford to ignore

Gaming the system is done all the time in the digital world from bot farms to pixel stuffing, billions of fake impressions, pop-ups and everything in between. My friend Bob Hoffman writes The Ad Contrarian, a blog often about rampant digital fraud in ad tech. It’s a must-read if you like spitting up your coffee.

Sure, much of Ozy’s shadiness comes from their own corruptness – but a lot of it has to do with the lack of transparency in digital advertising and issues with how digital ads are trafficked or measured and the games that can later be played. What exactly is a “social impression?” – Craig Silverman, amplifi

Social media addiction

The national concern over social media’s health effects has intensified.

A recent article in The Atlantic equated social media to “attention alcohol” and The Wall Street Journal drew a comparison between Facebook and the tobacco industry in its manipulative targeting of teens with a dangerous product. Helen Lee Bouygues, president of Reboot Foundation, identifies these issues as a national health crisis.

Reboot Foundation’s recent survey displays users’ feelings of concern on the topic. – Colin Kirkland, MediaPost

‘What if I don’t have a favourite radio station’

Most radio research qualifies respondents by asking (potential) respondents if they’re broadcast radio listeners.  Maybe it’s 30 or 60 minutes a day, or a minimum number of days in a week.  In any case, most research studies avoid those who have little-to-nothing to do with AM/FM radio.  Their rationale?  Why talk to defectors unlikely to come back?

So, what’s the net effect?  After all, don’t we just want to know what radio listeners think of the local stations in the area?

Of course we do.  But the radio qualifier question masks or diminishes the effects and impact of satellite radio, streaming audio platforms, podcasts, and even talking books on FM radio. – Fred Jacobs, Media Strategies

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Thomas Knapp: Legacy social media: Free as in beer, not as in speech – Ontario Argus Observer

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Thomas Knapp: Legacy social media: Free as in beer, not as in speech  Ontario Argus Observer



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Media Advisory: Minister Haggie to Announce Initiatives to Strengthen the Health Care System – News Releases – Government of Newfoundland and Labrador

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The Honourable John Haggie, Minister of Health and Community Services, will hold a media availability today (Monday, October 18) to announce initiatives to strengthen the health care system in Newfoundland and Labrador. The availability will take place in the Media Centre, East Block, Confederation Building, at 12:00 p.m.

The availability will be live-streamed on the Government of Newfoundland and Labrador’s FacebookTwitter and  YouTube accounts.

Media covering the availability will have the opportunity to join in person in the media centre or by teleconference. To participate, please RSVP to Nancy Hollett (nancyhollett@gov.nl.ca) who will provide the details and the required information.

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Media contact
Nancy Hollett
Health and Community Services
709-729-6554, 327-7878
nancyhollett@gov.nl.ca

2021 10 18
10:33 am

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Opinion: CBD gummy scam illustrates need for media literacy – Pique Newsmagazine

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Would you buy cannabis gummies from me? Apparently, hundreds of people would. Only trouble is, I don’t sell them, and I’m not looking for business opportunities. But recent online memes, stories and other disinformation have me not only selling and endorsing CBD gummies but also embroiled in a lawsuit with businessman Kevin O’Leary over them!

People see the bogus information, click through to a realistic product page, submit their personal and financial information and order the products. It appears they most often find the pitches on Facebook.

I’m saddened that anyone would spend money hoping to purchase products they thought I manufactured or recommended. The scam is still tricking innocent people. They contact the David Suzuki Foundation daily.

This got me reflecting on how and where people receive and process information. I’ve been a science communicator for more than half a century, so I’ve spent a lot of time thinking about how to get through to people. How do we ensure as many as possible have access to accurate, credible information so we can make informed decisions on issues that matter?

I’ve been fortunate to have worked many years at the CBC. As a public broadcaster, it’s been producing quality content and upholding journalistic standards since before the Second World War—and helped me earn credibility as a communicator.

Today, I compare that type of relationship—one based on accurate and fair communication of relatively diverse types of evidence and viewpoints—to what I see online, on social media, and it’s shocking. False information and scams abound, along with the worst political polarization in recent memory.

Fraud and misinformation have been around as long as we have, and perpetrators have always seized on the best available technologies to reach people. But in under 30 years, the internet has become our main information source, and the ubiquity of social media has given rise to effective, inexpensive ways to spread information, from bad to good and everything in between.

Close to 60 per cent of the world’s population—4.66 billion people—are active internet users, most accessing it through mobile devices. It infiltrates and informs every aspect of our lives.

As Marshall McLuhan posited in the 1960s, our technologies have become extensions of ourselves.

As these systems evolve and become more powerful, complex and efficient, so too must our collective ability to understand and use them.

As we receive more information online—from recipes to weather forecasts, product info to politics—how can we make sure it’s reliable, that we can trust it enough to make good decisions? If we’re wrong, what’s at stake? Many people search for or are fed information that confirms their beliefs rather than that which could help them better understand an issue. And, as recent vaccine opposition reveals, much of it promotes “personal freedom” while ignoring the responsibility that goes with it.

In today’s digital society, media literacy levels must match the sophistication of mass communication methods and big tech. But this isn’t the case, and we’re seeing the consequences, from increasing polarization to revelations about how platforms like Facebook, Instagram and WhatsApp foment division and conflict in the name of profit.

Environmentalists encounter the misinformation problem often. In 2021, a dwindling minority still reject the validity of climate science, despite an astounding amount of evidence proving the crisis is upon us and massive international scientific consensus regarding the urgent and necessary path forward.

How can we come together, have informed conversations and enjoy the benefits of evidence-based decision-making? It’s clearer than ever that a democracy works best when people have access to accurate, credible information.

We must see our information systems—news media, social media, etc.—as the foundations of democracy they are, and we must insist on keeping them, and the people who use them, healthy.

We should invest more public resources in ensuring our media industry is healthy, social media is properly regulated and most people are media literate enough to consume online information safely and responsibly. And we must take responsibility and get better at synthesizing information, considering various perspectives and uniting behind solutions to the world’s biggest problems.

It all begins with productive, respectful conversations based on good information. (And maybe some CBD—but not from me!)

David Suzuki is a scientist, broadcaster, author and co-founder of the David Suzuki Foundation. Written with contributions from David Suzuki Foundation Communications Director Brendan Glauser.

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